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2014 50 Book Challenge - Page 33

post #481 of 2047
32. Habibi, by Craig Thompson (2011)

A graphic novel, so I suppose this doesn't count (although it is 650pp). Habibi is the tale of two runaway children who shelter together in an abandoned boat in the desert, doing whatever it takes to survive. Dodona, a 12 year old girl, tries to shield the three year old Zam from the world and protect him. Eventually they are forced apart and, after many years of suffering, are finally reunited.

The book is a graphical feast, intricate and inventive. There is a lot of myth, ancient history and alchemy interspersed with images of people struggling to live in a modern third-world country. It's a heady mix, and a riveting read - I read it in a sitting, unable to put it down.

Not all graphic novels are twaddle about superheroes; this one is an exceptional example of what can be achieved in this form.
Edited by California Dreamer - 6/26/12 at 4:06pm
post #482 of 2047
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post

31b. Habibi, by Craig Thompson (2011)
A graphic novel, so I suppose this doesn't count (although it is 650pp). Habibi is the tale of two runaway children who shelter together in an abandoned boat in the desert, doing whatever it takes to survive. Dodona, a 12 year old girl, tries to shield the three year old Zam from the world and protect him. Eventually they are forced apart and, after many years of suffering, are finally reunited.
The book is a graphical feast, intricate and inventive. There is a lot of myth, ancient history and alchemy interspersed with images of people struggling to live in a modern third-world country. It's a heady mix, and a riveting read - I read it in a sitting, unable to put it down.
Not all graphic novels are twaddle about superheroes; this one is an exceptional example of what can be achieved in this form.

I don't know...Anything 650 pgs should count.

56. The Killing Floor Lee Child 1997
The first Reacher novel. His brother is killed investigating a counterfeit ring in a crooked little town. Lots of people get killed and he resolves the issue.

Guess I'm on pace for 100.
post #483 of 2047
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post

31b. Habibi, by Craig Thompson (2011)
A graphic novel, so I suppose this doesn't count (although it is 650pp).

I don't know...Anything 650 pgs should count.

OK, if you insist. :-)
post #484 of 2047
Suffering from real life interference. I am reading 2nd novel of the Forsyte Saga and it is brilliant. But life is intruding. Falling behind you true intellectuals. Hope 50 is still the target. I'll make that.
post #485 of 2047
war and peace is going to mess up my pace. laugh.gif
post #486 of 2047
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek View Post

war and peace is going to mess up my pace. laugh.gif

Took me 6 weeks but I planned it as so. 50. IMO Anna is better.

I'll send you some Reacher novels to pick your pace back up.
post #487 of 2047
57. Treasure Island Robert Louis Stevenson 1873
Classic for younger kids, on the list. but I've never read it. Now I know why. Pretty big disappointment.
post #488 of 2047
33. The Fears of Henry IV, by Ian Mortimer (2007)

Fans of Game of Thrones should try this book, about the real-life plotting and skullduggery as the Plantagenets and the Lancastrians vied for influence in medieval England.

The first half of the book, might be more aptly called the fears of Richard II. Richard came to the throne at age 10, after the death of the great King Edward III. The new king, unlike his glorious father the Black Prince, had no record of any note in combat or much else. His insecurities ked him to establish a rule of ruthless autoritariansim and scandalous favouritism. It was said at the the time that "a child of death is he who angers the king". Richard especially resented his noble, chivalrous cousin Henry of Lancaster. Jealous of his courtly and military success, Richard missed no opportunity to snub his cousin, deny him advancement and ultimately exiled him and cut him off from his inheritance.

This left Henry with little choice: he could embrace ignominy or return to England and overthrow the king. He chose the latter course and was greeted by the people as a saviour, but in doing so he set a precedent that upset the nobility across Europe. France and Scotland never recognised his kingship. It is likely that Henry also had Richard killed, which did nothing for his reputation.

The latter half of the book is about Henry's reign, his battles to secure his legitimacy and address England's financial woes while deaing with a stroppy House of Commons and Lords whose loyalty he could not count on, even his own son.

A religious man, Henry died an agonising and horrible death, which he was convinced was God's judgement on his actions. His reign is not well-remembered today, although Mortimer shows that some of his initiatives persist to this day. This book was a useful insight to the life of a man often overlooked in English history.
Edited by California Dreamer - 7/7/12 at 3:18am
post #489 of 2047
58. Running Blind Lee Child 2000
This was the most intricate of the Reacher novels I've read so far. Plot within a plot. 3 different cases being solved simultaneously. Much to my amazement, I had pegged the villain in the first 100 pages.
Good I got to 50 early. Looks like an unexpected major reason for slowing down has materialised... smile.gif
post #490 of 2047
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post

58. Running Blind Lee Child 2000
This was the most intricate of the Reacher novels I've read so far. Plot within a plot. 3 different cases being solved simultaneously. Much to my amazement, I had pegged the villain in the first 100 pages.
Good I got to 50 early. Looks like an unexpected major reason for slowing down has materialised... smile.gif

Just curious Steve, since you've read quite a few now, what do you think of the casting of Tom Cruise as Jack Reacher?
post #491 of 2047
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post

Just curious Steve, since you've read quite a few now, what do you think of the casting of Tom Cruise as Jack Reacher?

Abominable, Reacher was 6 5 250. Nick Nolte would be perfect but I think he's too old.

Cruise is a little Scientologic twerp.

(My apologies if that's your chosen religion).

I liked him in Risky Business and Top Gun. I've gotten older and acquired more taste since then.
post #492 of 2047
59. Echo Burning Lee Child 2001
Da Reach slaps a few people around. Shoots some more and never gets in trouble.
These books are addicting. I'm thinking I should just read them all and then get back to the list.
post #493 of 2047
Ignoring the size differential, I don't think Cruise is the right type of actor for Reacher. He's too much of a charmer, whereas Reacher is the "strong and silent" type.
post #494 of 2047
Clockwise counting 31/50: John Galsworthy - In Chancery (1920)

It took Galsworthy two decades to get around to writing the second novel of the Forsyte Saga trilogy but it is a smooth and fascinating transition as the story moves from the 19th to the 20th century - it is the time of the Boer war and the death of Queen Victoria; it is also for the Forsytes the time of a deep and painful split between two parts of the family. 

I am having a busy summer so not able to read as much as I would like to. The story of the Forsytes is however top notch entertainment for those rare lazy afternoons in the garden. 
post #495 of 2047
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reynard369 View Post

Ignoring the size differential, I don't think Cruise is the right type of actor for Reacher. He's too much of a charmer, whereas Reacher is the "strong and silent" type.

There's always Clint in his prime...
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