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WW Chan with your own material - Page 2

post #16 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by chorse123
Who else here has had a Chan sportcoat made? I think I'm going to order a blazer. I must say, though, I've seen some very mixed results posted here. A fair amount of that could be on the customer's back, but certainly not all of it.
I'm not sure what garments you're referring to, but based on personal experience, I would be inclined to put much of the blame on the customer for questionable results. Many of the SF members that patronize Chan do so with little or no previous experience with bespoke and they walk in with a laundry list of details that they want with little understanding of how those details all fit together (or not) into a coherent whole. While Patrick will try to dissuade one from the more egregious choices, the persistent customer can end up commissioning a poorly-chosen garment. Unlike many overseas vendors, Chan's customer service is excellent, too, so they will make any alterations that are necessary to make the customer happy. My only hesitation in recommending them more often is that I don't want the wait time on my orders to suffer. I would also note that Manton's comment above is probably as effusive as you could expect from him for a HK tailor.

dan
post #17 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by dah328
Ooh, I would certainly like to see that photo. Aside from whoopee's commissions which were certainly impressive, I've not seen pictures of any of Chan's work that was not done in a variation of their house style.

Yes, whoopee's commissions were outstanding! I'm sure the sharp eyes and greater cumulative experience of forum members would turn up things I've missed with my jacket, so I'd like feedback before my next Chan visit.
post #18 of 32
I agree that a lot of Chan stuff posted here looks ... questionable. But to the above names I would add Vintage Gent. His stuff fits well and, I would add, can be discerned at a glance as not RTW.
post #19 of 32
I didn't think it would be appropriate to mention names of those whose suits I thought were problematic. I'm sure you're right that many of the mistakes were on the customer. On my first custom orders I specified details rather than silhouette, and came out with a garment I no longer wear. Also, the Chan stuff which worries me was apparently from first or second orders. But not all of the errors were from customer requests, such as weird button stance (not as requested) and front/back balance. There are certainly excellent examples from Chan pictured here, including Vintage Gent's blazer, but those have come from farther in the process. Who knows, just kicking around the ideas, but will be ordering a jacket from someone!
post #20 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by chorse123
I didn't think it would be appropriate to mention names of those whose suits I thought were problematic. I'm sure you're right that many of the mistakes were on the customer. On my first custom orders I specified details rather than silhouette, and came out with a garment I no longer wear. Also, the Chan stuff which worries me was apparently from first or second orders. But not all of the errors were from customer requests, such as weird button stance (not as requested) and front/back balance. There are certainly excellent examples from Chan pictured here, including Vintage Gent's blazer, but those have come from farther in the process. Who knows, just kicking around the ideas, but will be ordering a jacket from someone!
My feeling is that the best case is to go to somebody who likes the same things you do. It sounds obvious, but if you only need to go back and forth about pockets and buttons, it leaves a lot of energy that can be put towards getting the fit right. I know that in my own work, if a client asks me to do something that is different for me, or against my way of doing things, I spend so much time and energy trying to see things the new way, that I can hardly execute correctly. I assume that it is the same for tailors.
post #21 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton
I agree that a lot of Chan stuff posted here looks ... questionable. But to the above names I would add Vintage Gent. His stuff fits well.

Gee, Manton, thanks. Coming from so venerable an observer, that's high praise.
post #22 of 32
How many garments had you ordered before the blazer, Vintage Gent?
post #23 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by chorse123
How many garments had you ordered before the blazer, Vintage Gent?

Aside from shirts, my orders have been as follows:

Suit 1 (SB, notch, ordered on tour): Sleeves much too long; more waist supression needed; both corrected
Suit 2: (SB, peak, ordered on tour): Fine all around; no changes made
Suit 3: (DB, ordered on tour): Only very minor changes from suit 2
Blazer 1: (SB, ordered via e-mail from measurements on file)
Suit 4: (DB, ordered via e-mail from measurements on file)
post #24 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by dah328
I'm not sure what garments you're referring to, but based on personal experience, I would be inclined to put much of the blame on the customer for questionable results. Many of the SF members that patronize Chan do so with little or no previous experience with bespoke and they walk in with a laundry list of details that they want with little understanding of how those details all fit together (or not) into a coherent whole. While Patrick will try to dissuade one from the more egregious choices, the persistent customer can end up commissioning a poorly-chosen garment. Unlike many overseas vendors, Chan's customer service is excellent, too, so they will make any alterations that are necessary to make the customer happy. My only hesitation in recommending them more often is that I don't want the wait time on my orders to suffer. I would also note that Manton's comment above is probably as effusive as you could expect from him for a HK tailor.

dan


I have had a few problems with my Chan orders (coming up on my 9th or 10th suit now) that did not result from customer errors--they were purely production errors. But in my experience, they will fix those kinds of problems at their expense, even if it means remaking the garment.

I would note that if you deal with them solely through US tour stops, it is very important to get a basted fitting if you want to maximize the chances of the first order being just right. I didn't do that, and while I am happy with the first suit I ordered from them, it would have been better with a basted fitting to work out some details of button stance and shoulder structure.
post #25 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by chorse123
Who else here has had a Chan sportcoat made? I think I'm going to order a blazer. I must say, though, I've seen some very mixed results posted here. A fair amount of that could be on the customer's back, but certainly not all of it.

I've had two blazers and two sportcoats made by Chan. Just got my most recent one, a Shetland tweed hacking jacket, on Monday before last and wore it for the first time today since it has cooled down somewhat. I am extremely satisfied with my Chan sportcoats and blazers and hope to get at least a half-dozen more over the next three years or so. However, I am not the most exigent of customers. Were I a habitue of Savile Row or the top NY tailors, I might not be such a Chanfan. However, they do seem to deliver a lot for the money.

My next purchase is likely to be a raw silk blazer with Holland & Sherry enamel buttons.
post #26 of 32
I just received my first Chan order. I'll try to post pictures next week since I'd love to get feedback before my next order. But my quick reaction is that they did a fairly good job. The jacket should fit closer and the sleeves need to be shorter, but the overall silhouette is what I asked for.
post #27 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton
But certain things like Shetlands that won't last too long

There's probably an obvious answer to this but I can't see it - I was looking at the Holland and Sherry Islay and Shetland book yesterday and it seemed like pretty sturdy stuff.

What makes it less durable? The openness of the weave?
post #28 of 32
Shetland is made from very loosely spun yarns, and the handlooms do not yield tight weaves. It tends to get threadbare over time. This is why (among other reasons) you never see Shetland trousers.
post #29 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton
Shetland is made from very loosely spun yarns, and the handlooms do not yield tight weaves. It tends to get threadbare over time. This is why (among other reasons) you never see Shetland trousers.
On the other hand, slightly threadbare shetland has its own appeal. Shetland pants... yuck.
post #30 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt
On the other hand, slightly threadbare shetland has its own appeal.
I agree. I never get two pairs of trousers with flannel suits. If the knees and waistband get a little threadbare (and they will), so what. It's flannel. It's when you get to the point of needing leather patches on jacket sleeves that you have a problem. So far that has never happened to me.
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