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Is being a sportsfan a sign of plebeian tastes and culture?

post #1 of 40
Thread Starter 

I had a friend tell me the US sports fan is becoming a sign of WT.
(I'm not saying I agree with this as I think you can enjoy being a spectator and also the 'socially' considered better things in life)

So what are the characteristics of the common US sportsfan?
post #2 of 40
It's late here, sorry if it is obvious but what is WT?
post #3 of 40
I think not being a sports fan is a sign of wussiness. Tell your friend to hike his skirt up a bit.
post #4 of 40
People certainly do find ways to incorporate sports and sportsfanning (to coin a most ridiculous term) into being tasteless, but being a sportsfan by no means implies lack of taste.
post #5 of 40
"Sophistication" without a common touch and a love for the "plebeian" is boring and one-dimensional. And utterly unsophisticated.
post #6 of 40
Of course, some theorists would maintain that large-scale sports events were devised to keep the masses at bay, and generally satisfied; same with religion.
post #7 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nonk
It's late here, sorry if it is obvious but what is WT?

I am not certain, but I think he means it to stand for "white trash". Its an overused label that has strayed far from its original meaning.
post #8 of 40
Demolition derbies, and monster trucks are indicative of white trash.
post #9 of 40
There are sports fans that like clothes. And there are people who hate sports that don't like clothes. I don't think love of one is connected to lack of love of the other.
post #10 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
Of course, some theorists would maintain that large-scale sports events were devised to keep the masses at bay, and generally satisfied; same with religion.

Except that sports are for pure enjoyment and don't have the mind-control element of religion; the fear of losing a game or a bet riding on one is not of the same magnitude as the fear of going to hell.

Certain sports are generally considered to be quite low-brow -- studio wrestling and monster trucks, for instance. Others are considered gentlemen's sports -- polo, golf, etc.

I think it's neither fair nor accurate to generalize about sports fans.
post #11 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nantucket Red
Except that sports are for pure enjoyment and don't have the mind-control element of religion; the fear of losing a game or a bet riding on one is not of the same magnitude as the fear of going to hell. Certain sports are generally considered to be quite low-brow -- studio wrestling and monster trucks, for instance. Others are considered gentlemen's sports -- polo, golf, etc. I think it's neither fair nor accurate to generalize about sports fans.
It seems the more "personal"-oriented sports or individual type sports like riding or golf are more attentive to a person's development whereas large-scale spectator sports like American football, tends to obscure personalities thus conjuring the mass mentality.
post #12 of 40
Thread Starter 
post #13 of 40
Doesn't it depend on the sport?
post #14 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradford
Doesn't it depend on the sport?
To an extent, yes, but it's not like every guy who watches SportsCenter gets his clothes from the rummage pile either.

Taste is subjective; some of us have it, some of us don't. The good news is that we can all develop more of it, if we allow ourselves to.
post #15 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soph

I had a friend tell me the US sports fan is becoming a sign of WT.
(I'm not saying I agree with this as I think you can enjoy being a spectator and also the 'socially' considered better things in life)

So what are the characteristics of the common US sportsfan?

is your friend dkzzz?
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