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Just finished a 20 day water fast - Page 11

post #151 of 198
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulYAY View Post
update from the original poster?
Overall, everything has gone pretty smoothly. When I started the fast I weighed 184 pounds, standing 5' 9", with a considerable amount of muscle and some extra weight in the lower abdomen and upper thighs. On the 20th day, I weighed 161 pounds, with most of that fat lost, and also a degree of muscle and strength decrease. Since then, I have been eating very small meals, as I am aware of how my metabolism has slowed, and limit caloric intake to around 1200 calories a day. I am eating a large portion of these calories in the form of protein to rebuild muscle tissue which was catabolized during the fast. In only a few weeks my strength has markedly improved and am pretty surprised at how fast I am rebuilding muscle. I am doing weights about 3-4 times a week, and jogging daily. I am settled right now at 167 pounds, so a 6 pound increase in total, a large portion of which has been water weight and body tissue, as I haven't visibly put back on any of the fat I lost. As I said in the original post, the fast wasn't meant as a means for weight loss, however the byproduct of a leaner body has been an appreciated side effect. Mentally, I have noticed that I am much calmer and content. Certain things that used to bother me are now of little importance, and I find I am able to think things through in a much more rational manner. Whereas before I might have acted out before taking the time to process my thoughts and emotions, I am now able to identify and eliminate sources of stress and discomfort in a healthy manner. Practicing meditation has helped with this a lot. I cannot claim to understand all of the physiological and psychological mechanisms at work to allow for this, but I do know that the fast allowed for a change in certain behaviors and habitual tendencies for the better. Even if it is just a placebo effect, it's the most useful placebo I have ever taken.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rach2jlc View Post
The bolded portion above was my question as well; what "normal" person having a job, a life, in a relationship, and needing to make ends meet to pay the rent could ever do this (i.e. "I'm feeling euphoric, but can't get out of bed, so I'll just stay in this week and not go out.") The only thing I can imagine is that the OP is very young/in school, etc. This seems something to try when you're 18 and angry at the world, wanting to show your parents that you didn't need their Saab for your birthday, and wish to join in solidarity your brothers and sisters around the world subsisting on $1.20 a day, while tabbing over to the other open window to order J.Crew chinos and a new wireless keyboard for your Macbook.
I am extremely grateful to be young enough (19) and with a lack of actual responsibilities to be able to have the freedom to undergo what I did. I am not unappreciative at all. I am not here advising anyone to follow in my footsteps, and I understand that this is not reality, nor a panacea for all that ails you. I am very well aware of the paucity of research into the benefits and potential hazards of extended fasting. I simply wrote this post in the interest of sharing my experience and answering whatever questions I could. The rarity of hearing about someone fasting makes it quite easy for people to call me crazy and dismiss what I have done as some sort of charade or act of rebellion. I was not, as you say, angry at the world, nor did I blindly decide to fast without prior knowledge and adequate research. The motivation of this endeavor was to improve my overall constitution, and gain a better understanding of myself and of the world in which I live, both of which were accomplished. Please don't trivialize what you do not know.
post #152 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by mm84321 View Post
Overall, everything has gone pretty smoothly. When I started the fast I weighed 184 pounds, standing 5' 9", with a considerable amount of muscle and some extra weight in the lower abdomen and upper thighs. On the 20th day, I weighed 161 pounds, with most of that fat lost, and also a degree of muscle and strength decrease.

Since then, I have been eating very small meals, as I am aware of how my metabolism has slowed, and limit caloric intake to around 1200 calories a day. I am eating a large portion of these calories in the form of protein to rebuild muscle tissue which was catabolized during the fast. In only a few weeks my strength has markedly improved and am pretty surprised at how fast I am rebuilding muscle. I am doing weights about 3-4 times a week, and jogging daily. I am settled right now at 167 pounds, so a 6 pound increase in total, a large portion of which has been water weight and body tissue, as I haven't visibly put back on any of the fat I lost.

As I said in the original post, the fast wasn't meant as a means for weight loss, however the byproduct of a leaner body has been an appreciated side effect.

Mentally, I have noticed that I am much calmer and content. Certain things that used to bother me are now of little importance, and I find I am able to think things through in a much more rational manner. Whereas before I might have acted out before taking the time to process my thoughts and emotions, I am now able to identify and eliminate sources of stress and discomfort in a healthy manner. Practicing meditation has helped with this a lot.

I cannot claim to understand all of the physiological and psychological mechanisms at work to allow for this, but I do know that the fast allowed for a change in certain behaviors and habitual tendencies for the better. Even if it is just a placebo effect, it's the most useful placebo I have ever taken.



I am extremely grateful to be young enough (19) and with a lack of actual responsibilities to be able to have the freedom to undergo what I did. I am not unappreciative at all. I am not here advising anyone to follow in my footsteps, and I understand that this is not reality, nor a panacea for all that ails you. I am very well aware of the paucity of research into the benefits and potential hazards of extended fasting. I simply wrote this post in the interest of sharing my experience and answering whatever questions I could.

The rarity of hearing about someone fasting makes it quite easy for people to call me crazy and dismiss what I have done as some sort of charade or act of rebellion. I was not, as you say, angry at the world, nor did I blindly decide to fast without prior knowledge and adequate research. The motivation of this endeavor was to improve my overall constitution, and gain a better understanding of myself and of the world in which I live, both of which were accomplished. Please don't trivialize what you do not know.

Is it...is it fun being this dumb?
post #153 of 198
OP is a complete retard which is why he has 16 avatarless noob alt-nics in this thread spreading similar claims. I can only shake my head at anyone who's even wasted the brainpower required to read his insultingly idiotic posts in this topic. Buddy, you are so stupid there is no swearword I can write here that does you justice. Enjoy the short road to death, may it come quickly.
post #154 of 198
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DBoon View Post
Is it...is it fun being this dumb?

As I said, a paucity of research, not a complete absence, the great majority of which is over a century old.
post #155 of 198
You know, the sad thing is that ten years ago when I was 19, I was probably gullible and impressionable enough to entertain the same ideas and beliefs as the OP. My dad also believes all this pseudoscience bullshit, and it's sad really. I haven't yet figured out exactly what quality allows a person to be able to distinguish between high-quality, truthful, academic information vs sensational, you-want-to-believe-it, it-sounds-good, bullshit information. I can only hope that in 10, 20, or 30 years the OP looks back at himself and laughs as his inexperience of the time, and then helps by promoting quality information rather than promoting false information online. OP, you only believe everything you claim, because your generalized experience, in your mind, matches with what you read. It's called cognitive bias. There are so many various cognitives bias that warp peoples' perception of reality, and if you aren't aware of what those biases are, you'll never know that you're beliefs are incorrect. There's a reason that people spend years in school studying a specific topic, and there's a reason that research must be peer reviewed and scrutinized, there's a reason skepticism is necessary, and there's a reason that double-blinded placebo-controlled studies must exist. Because even the most intelligent and educated people are susceptible to accepting lies and errors as fact. The human mind loves to draw connections where there are none, people love to cheer for the underdog, people like to believe the sensational "brand new cure-that-no-one-else-has", love to find hidden meanings in things, and love to think that the information they've chosen to accept is the "truth" that no one else is smart enough to understand. And to the OP: You're entitled to your own opinions -- we all are. And you have the right as a person to fast if you've like, to read whatever you want, and to enjoy yourself as a person. But, no one is entitled to their own facts, and I find it immoral to spread information that is not proven correct. Anecdotal stories are just stories. If you study physiology you'll find that the body doesn't store "toxins", your body eats its own muscle tissue when it needs energy, and scars don't heal themselves as a result of starvation. Humans live longer than they ever have (and are healthier), the reason why cancer and other disease is so prevalent now is because fewer babies and fewer women die during childbirth and because people live longer, and no, grains aren't bad for you unless you have a severe digestive disorder. Please focus on what you're good at in life (not educating people on nutritional matters).
post #156 of 198
lulz at every single page=5 star threak, would def. read again.
post #157 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by mm84321 View Post
As I said, a paucity of research, not a complete absence, the great majority of which is over a century old.

LOL

Why dont you try bloodletting while you're at it
post #158 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by samssf View Post
You know, the sad thing is that ten years ago when I was 19, I was probably gullible and impressionable enough to entertain the same ideas and beliefs as the OP.

My dad also believes all this pseudoscience bullshit, and it's sad really. I haven't yet figured out exactly what quality allows a person to be able to distinguish between high-quality, truthful, academic information vs sensational, you-want-to-believe-it, it-sounds-good, bullshit information.

I can only hope that in 10, 20, or 30 years the OP looks back at himself and laughs as his inexperience of the time, and then helps by promoting quality information rather than promoting false information online.

OP, you only believe everything you claim, because your generalized experience, in your mind, matches with what you read. It's called cognitive bias. There are so many various cognitives bias that warp peoples' perception of reality, and if you aren't aware of what those biases are, you'll never know that you're beliefs are incorrect.

There's a reason that people spend years in school studying a specific topic, and there's a reason that research must be peer reviewed and scrutinized, there's a reason skepticism is necessary, and there's a reason that double-blinded placebo-controlled studies must exist. Because even the most intelligent and educated people are susceptible to accepting lies and errors as fact. The human mind loves to draw connections where there are none, people love to cheer for the underdog, people like to believe the sensational "brand new cure-that-no-one-else-has", love to find hidden meanings in things, and love to think that the information they've chosen to accept is the "truth" that no one else is smart enough to understand.

And to the OP: You're entitled to your own opinions -- we all are. And you have the right as a person to fast if you've like, to read whatever you want, and to enjoy yourself as a person. But, no one is entitled to their own facts, and I find it immoral to spread information that is not proven correct. Anecdotal stories are just stories.

If you study physiology you'll find that the body doesn't store "toxins", your body eats its own muscle tissue when it needs energy, and scars don't heal themselves as a result of starvation. Humans live longer than they ever have (and are healthier), the reason why cancer and other disease is so prevalent now is because fewer babies and fewer women die during childbirth and because people live longer, and no, grains aren't bad for you unless you have a severe digestive disorder.

Please focus on what you're good at in life (not educating people on nutritional matters).


+1 and Quoted in hopes of further boosting the signal to noise ratio of this thread and forum.
post #159 of 198
It is sad how many of you gentlemen knock the OP regarding this matter. Fasting is good for you; I fast intermittently. Please begin to read more about health. Start with Gary Taube's Good Calories, Bad Calories. Then go to Michael Pollen's The Omnivore's Dilemma. Then peruse the blog Marksdailyapple.com. Also discover thewhole9.com. Then check out other alternative health sites dedicated to eating, basically, like a caveman. You will find that it is not how much you eat, but what you eat that affects your weight and overall health. You will find that fasting - putting your body in survival mode - will benefit you greatly. You will find that most of the conventional wisdom regarding health - especially here in the US - is insanely dumb. And you will feel better if you actually listen to people who have improved their health through willpower and research. OP, I would avoided distilled water, though; it does, as has been stated, leach minerals from your body and could've proved harmful. But great job nonetheless. Check out the sites mentioned - you will find enlightenment.
post #160 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by samssf View Post
You know, the sad thing is that ten years ago when I was 19, I was probably gullible and impressionable enough to entertain the same ideas and beliefs as the OP.

My dad also believes all this pseudoscience bullshit, and it's sad really. I haven't yet figured out exactly what quality allows a person to be able to distinguish between high-quality, truthful, academic information vs sensational, you-want-to-believe-it, it-sounds-good, bullshit information.

I can only hope that in 10, 20, or 30 years the OP looks back at himself and laughs as his inexperience of the time, and then helps by promoting quality information rather than promoting false information online.

OP, you only believe everything you claim, because your generalized experience, in your mind, matches with what you read. It's called cognitive bias. There are so many various cognitives bias that warp peoples' perception of reality, and if you aren't aware of what those biases are, you'll never know that you're beliefs are incorrect.

There's a reason that people spend years in school studying a specific topic, and there's a reason that research must be peer reviewed and scrutinized, there's a reason skepticism is necessary, and there's a reason that double-blinded placebo-controlled studies must exist. Because even the most intelligent and educated people are susceptible to accepting lies and errors as fact. The human mind loves to draw connections where there are none, people love to cheer for the underdog, people like to believe the sensational "brand new cure-that-no-one-else-has", love to find hidden meanings in things, and love to think that the information they've chosen to accept is the "truth" that no one else is smart enough to understand.

And to the OP: You're entitled to your own opinions -- we all are. And you have the right as a person to fast if you've like, to read whatever you want, and to enjoy yourself as a person. But, no one is entitled to their own facts, and I find it immoral to spread information that is not proven correct. Anecdotal stories are just stories.

If you study physiology you'll find that the body doesn't store "toxins", your body eats its own muscle tissue when it needs energy, and scars don't heal themselves as a result of starvation. Humans live longer than they ever have (and are healthier), the reason why cancer and other disease is so prevalent now is because fewer babies and fewer women die during childbirth and because people live longer, and no, grains aren't bad for you unless you have a severe digestive disorder.

Please focus on what you're good at in life (not educating people on nutritional matters).


This post is completely wrong, on so many levels. Do you think that the obesity/cancer/diabetes epidemic that has exponentially grown over the past 50 years is ridiculous?

Read the books I outlined in the post above and get back to me. Eat whole foods instead of processed foods and see what happens.

But I doubt you will, as you have, like some of my very naiive high school students, purported an argument based on your own limited (and quite short-sighted) beliefs. You, I'm sure, will not actually further study or research this topic, but continue to lambast people who have taken it upon themselves to better their health through some very basic understandings (as outlined from the sources I've provided).

Isn't it American to not believe all you've been told, especially by the government and the news?

Speak about insulin reactions and nutrition and maybe I would listen to your silly rant.

Or, continue to believe the human body is doomed to catch a disease because of old age, and enjoy your disease.
post #161 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roguls View Post
It is sad how many of you gentlemen knock the OP regarding this matter. Fasting is good for you; I fast intermittently.

Please begin to read more about health. Start with Gary Taube's Good Calories, Bad Calories. Then go to Michael Pollen's The Omnivore's Dilemma. Then peruse the blog Marksdailyapple.com.

Which one of these suggets a 20 day water fast is a good thing? Or a 10 day water fast?

Intermittent fasting is not the same thing.
post #162 of 198
for the amount of correct info in taubes' book theres just enough bullshit in it. especially his insulin and calories don't matter theory. http://weightology.net/weightologyweekly/?page_id=319
post #163 of 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by captshiner View Post
for the amount of correct info in taubes' book theres just enough bullshit in it. especially his insulin and calories don't matter theory.

http://weightology.net/weightologyweekly/?page_id=319

Again, you are wrong. I have consumed over 5k calories in a day, for about a week straight, and didn't gain a pound. I exercised two of those days. And not hard.

I was on vacation at the beach, and still kept my carb consumption below 150.

And it's all about the insulin, man. If your pancreas is secreting too much insulin, it prompts your body to store fat.

When I fast intermittently, I do not lose weight. I've been a steady 165 for the past three months (lost 10lbs fat during 1st month eating low carb/whole foods). My body just regulates.

Again, I challenge anyone who is a disbeliever to try the Whole 30. Then report back. But be honest. And don't cheat.

Intermittent fasting is the way to go, imo. I personally couldn't do a water fast, but it is in no way going to be detrimental to someone who is overweight or has 10lbs to shed. Again, though, I would NOT drink distilled water. Really, staying away from extremes is the way to go - just know your limits and make better choices.
post #164 of 198
i have 10 pounds to shed. im thinking about totally cut the crap out my diet (processed foods, sugary drinks) and just eating whole foods, low carb and water and more sleep. i wonder how much i can lose on diet alone (without exercising more than usual).
post #165 of 198
I support OP.
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