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Alter's annual chicken thread - Page 4

post #46 of 71
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
Wagyu nigiri?

post #47 of 71
If there was any criticism to be had of the dry salting method I used it's that even with multiple rinses, the meat ended up being too salty for my tastes. I'm wondering if I should have used a different kind of salt instead. For example, a coarser kosher salt?
post #48 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackjack View Post
If there was any criticism to be had of the dry salting method I used it's that even with multiple rinses, the meat ended up being too salty for my tastes. I'm wondering if I should have used a different kind of salt instead. For example, a coarser kosher salt?
That's odd. I can't imagine the coarseness of the salt making that much of a difference if a rinse was involved. Maybe dial down the salting time?
post #49 of 71
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackjack View Post
If there was any criticism to be had of the dry salting method I used it's that even with multiple rinses, the meat ended up being too salty for my tastes. I'm wondering if I should have used a different kind of salt instead. For example, a coarser kosher salt?

How much salt did you use? And how long did you rinse?

I actually had the opposite result and found the salt level to be perfect on my dry brined bird. I was fairly conservative with the salt though...probably a little more than a tablespoon for the whole bird. I used around half sea salt and half Janes Crazy Salt. I rubbed it in as the sea salt was too wet to be able to sprinkle it on. It sat covered for around 20 hours and then I just wiped the bird down with some paper towels to get rid of the moisture that came out as well as any excess salt. Into a heated pan to sear the bottom and then into an oven at 230C.

FYI...I made some torihamu a few months ago with a honey-salt cure that was too salty, which I discovered after it was cooked. I was able to get the salt out by pouring just boiled water over it and then leaving it for around 30 minutes. Then I discarded the water and repeated the process. It worked wonders.
post #50 of 71
making this today Khao Man Gai (also known as Hainanese Chicken Rice) http://www.shesimmers.com/2009/06/ho...o-man-gai.html
post #51 of 71
I used about 700 grams of sea salt for all three birds - and they were salted overnight. Next time, maybe less salting time and perhaps the boiling water rinse might do the trick.

I have to say the that the leftover roast chicken - with its higher salt content - makes for a mean ochazuke .
post #52 of 71
i've got a lot of experience with the dry-salting ... i use about 1 tablespoon coarse kosher salt (diamond crystal) per 5 pounds of bird. easy to remember. Also, one day isn't really enough to get the brining effect. you really need 2-3 days at least. and no rinse should be necessary. rather, pat dry and then (even better) air-dry in the fridge for 6-8 hours.
post #53 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post
i've got a lot of experience with the dry-salting ... i use about 1 tablespoon coarse kosher salt (diamond crystal) per 5 pounds of bird. easy to remember. Also, one day isn't really enough to get the brining effect. you really need 2-3 days at least. and no rinse should be necessary. rather, pat dry and then (even better) air-dry in the fridge for 6-8 hours.

Followed this method on a turkey last week. Most successful result I've had cooking a turkey. Will give it a try with chicken.
post #54 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post
i've got a lot of experience with the dry-salting ... i use about 1 tablespoon coarse kosher salt (diamond crystal) per 5 pounds of bird. easy to remember. Also, one day isn't really enough to get the brining effect. you really need 2-3 days at least. and no rinse should be necessary. rather, pat dry and then (even better) air-dry in the fridge for 6-8 hours.


Wow. Thanks. No wonder with almost a kilogram of salt the chickens were so salty! Will definitely give your method a try.
post #55 of 71
you sure you didn't mistake 700 milligrams for 700 grams, man?
post #56 of 71
Nah. It was definitely 700 grams of salt I used on all three chickens - a full bag of salt. I thought that thoroughly rinsing the chickens afterward would remove the excess and leave it seasoned perfectly. However it was too salty for my tastes.
post #57 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoRon View Post
I'm better at eating than cooking. My Jambalaya is very good - but I do not claim total authenticity. I made it up by looking at a bunch of different recipes. I also am not a measurer, so - everything is relative: Start with medium chop of Onions / Celery / Green Pepper and some minced garlic in a large sautee pan (stainless). Sweat the vegetables in a bit of olive oil and remove most of them. Get the pan a little hotter, and add a few leg/thigh quarters which have been generously seasoned with a creole mix (I get mine from the spice house - but any commercial low sodium mix will do). Brown the chicken on both sides and remove. Deglaze with a little red or white wine. Now, you will need to have pre-measured 3 cups of water, and you will need to be using 1.5 to 1 rice (it just works the best). After deglazing, put the chicken back in the sautee pan and add the 3 cups of water along with a little salt and pepper and some bay leaves. Boil for a while, until chicken is done. Meanwhile, heat smoked chorizo in another pan. Retain all that nice grease, and use it to brown your 2 cups of rice. When the chicken is done, remove it from the sautee pan, and replace it with the browned rice. Cook as instructed. Now , go to another pan and start boiling some shrimp or crawfish. Shock cold when done. In a mixing bowl, combine a bunch of canned CRUSHED tomatoes with the veggies and the chorizo and the shrimp/crawfish. Add a shit-ton more cajun mix, some salt, black pepper, and a bunch of tobasco (to taste). Pull the chicken off the bones, and put that into the mix too. When the rice is done, dump that whole thing in and mix it up. There should be enough that it coats the rice and makes it red, but not soupy (just enough that the water will evaporate off while you heat everything else up).
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcg View Post
^ Sounds great, will be trying soon. Thanks!
DCG - did you ever try my Jabalaya? I actually never got around to doing it again until tonight. I was inspired by the bad jambalaya on Top Chef last week. I was very happy with the way it turned out. Curious if you were able to follow it how I wrote it down.
post #58 of 71
Funny timing Ron; I actually meant to try it just last week but a few things came up and I just wasn't able to get around to it. Your writeup makes perfect sense to me, even as inexperienced in the kitchen as I am. Due to my lack of experience I tend to prefer measurements, but I will do my best!
post #59 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcg View Post
Funny timing Ron; I actually meant to try it just last week but a few things came up and I just wasn't able to get around to it. Your writeup makes perfect sense to me, even as inexperienced in the kitchen as I am. Due to my lack of experience I tend to prefer measurements, but I will do my best!
shit-ton is a measurement, no? BTW - put a bit (about 1/3-1/2) cup of extra water, as you lose some while the chicken is cooking.
post #60 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoRon View Post
shit-ton is a measurement, no?
but you didn't specify metric or imperial.
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