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post #316 of 472
40K plus bonus/commission (ended up ~55K the first twelve months), which was a minor miracle for me as a liberal arts grad in the early 2000s.
post #317 of 472
Started in 1997 with a BA - $28k, 40 hrs per week. Supporting a family.

Now close to $200k, but I live in the great socialist republik of Canada, where they tax me like there's no tomorrow. Closer to 50 hrs per week

As someone else mentioned, you gotta pay your dues. I remember living for the first couple of years stealing Toilet paper from public washrooms, one roll at a time, and buying the half rotten $1 bag o' assorted fruit from the supermarket. No cable, no internet. One of my bi-weekly paychecks didn't even cover the rent for my small 1 bedroom apartment.
post #318 of 472

40k - great benefits, matched 401k, great firm, VERY HAPPY.

 

M.Arch from a very reputable and distinguished school in London, UK. B.Arch from less reputable school on East Coast US.

post #319 of 472
Quote:
Originally Posted by thisisblex View Post

i couldn't get past the first 6 pages, but the result i ended up with is that being a coder for wall street is essentially the best job out there. 

I take it you read my comments - it was a good job. A good developer from SV has a good chance of massively increasing his take-home by working on Wall St. With Google expanding their operations in NYC, and Facebook opening offices there, plus the burgeoning tech startup scene out there, the numbers are only going to go up as competition for talent increases.

I heard recently that GS is eliminating a lot of frontline positions, but those are not the jobs that you want anyways - what you want is the jobs in new product development with a quantitative analysis angle or a straight up quant job. As far as tech jobs go, quants and strats get *paid*
post #320 of 472
15.5k/yr in 2006. It was actually minimum wage. It was a loan to myself. It's called a draw. I was working for a prop trading firm. It was horrible. No benefits. So I got paid 50% of what I made in trading profits after fees. And obviously you're not gonna make too much trading if you're new / don't know what you're doing / were a history major in college and didn't know what a Bid/Ask spread was. Fees were part fixed, part sliding, but the fixed part was 1500/mo. So I had to make 31k (2x 15.5) + 18k (1.5k x 12mos) + trade commissions (sliding depending on volume) = ~60000 in trading profits just to get my 15.5 k / yr. It was truly an awful year. And yet, it allowed me to get my foot in the door and 4 years later I was making over 200k / yr. So the risk paid off. And honestly, although miserable, I had times when I was much more miserable making waaaay more money.
post #321 of 472
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

To those of you with heavily bonus-weighted income...like having 20-30% or more of your income paid in discretionary bonuses (so not guaranteed things like a bonus if you meet your sales targets or complete XYZ task).
How do you report your income as a whole? I know its best to not assume the bonus income for budgeting things like rent and other fixed expenses but what about for filling out some form or responding to a survey where you need to state a single number for income (like maybe you are applying for a loan or an apartment and the payments fit in your budget but they need an accurate income figure).
Do you just report the base salary or do you factor in an estimated bonus? maybe try to come up with a bare minimum bonus?

I have only done this for credit cards, so nothing serious like a home loan, but I usually just take my worst bonus from previous 3 bonus cycles and use that. Not great, but figure it's safer than taking the median or avg.
post #322 of 472
If we're talking about our first "real" jobs: $47/hour
post #323 of 472
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwyhajlo View Post

If we're talking about our first "real" jobs: $47/hour

so almost 100K for your first job?
post #324 of 472
Quote:
Originally Posted by yjeezle View Post

so almost 100K for your first job?

Yes.

Edit: The pay doesn't go much higher than that, though, unless you end up in a management position.
post #325 of 472
$22/hour on contract as an Analyst after being somewhat unemployed for a year after 9/11. Pretty fair given the job climate at the time.
post #326 of 472

Straight out of HS: $50k

Starting in June 2012: $88k

If things go as planned, when I start working for my father it will be around $95-100k

 

All this with no college education yet. :)

post #327 of 472
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geran Brown View Post

All this with no college education yet. smile.gif

College, if done properly, is not about getting you a great paying job when you graduate.
post #328 of 472
Quote:
Originally Posted by deepitm View Post


College, if done properly, is not about getting you a great paying job when you graduate.

I know...it's just what people always say about me. I'm going to go to college though. :)

post #329 of 472

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by deepitm View Post


College, if done properly, is not about getting you a great paying job when you graduate.

 

yep

 

but this is one of the things you actually learn in college if the education 'takes'

post #330 of 472
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fraiche View Post

$22/hour on contract as an Analyst after being somewhat unemployed for a year after 9/11. Pretty fair given the job climate at the time.

Can you update us on the fiance hijacking your account ??
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