or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Business, Careers & Education › Seven Year Career Itch: Teaching
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Seven Year Career Itch: Teaching - Page 2

post #16 of 27
If you decide to go the education route, do NOT go into a straight MS/PhD program for the hard sciences. These are DEAD END. There are only so many tenure tract jobs out there and more than likely you'll be stuck doing post-doc after post-doc. On top of that, your salary won't be much different than what you make now and it will certainly be more difficult. If you do want to go back to school, make it a professional school such as Law, Medicine, Dentistry,..heck, even ministry isn't a bad career. These jobs are not limited nearly as much by the economy and they nearly guarantee you a nice career as soon as you graduate.
post #17 of 27
If you're really feeling bored or burned out, you should leave teaching, which works best when it's a labor of love.

Be careful, though, about taking on a lot of debt for a career change.
post #18 of 27
Posting so I can follow this thread. I've been teaching chemistry at the college level for about a year now and I'm already getting bored. I'm in a bit of a different scenario, since I already have a PhD. I don't really feel challenged by teaching, once I've done a class a few times most of the kinks are worked out and it's just the same thing with different kids.

If I were going to do this long term, I think I'd have to find somewhere more selective on students, but those jobs are hard to get.

Looking forward to getting into industry and actually using my skills. I like teaching, but it's just not doing it for me right now. Maybe once I get older and don't have enough energy to do anything more stressful.
post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by TKJTG View Post
If you decide to go the education route, do NOT go into a straight MS/PhD program for the hard sciences. These are DEAD END. There are only so many tenure tract jobs out there and more than likely you'll be stuck doing post-doc after post-doc. On top of that, your salary won't be much different than what you make now and it will certainly be more difficult.

If you do want to go back to school, make it a professional school such as Law, Medicine, Dentistry,..heck, even ministry isn't a bad career. These jobs are not limited nearly as much by the economy and they nearly guarantee you a nice career as soon as you graduate.

Law nearly guarantees a nice career as soon as you graduate??? Really? Noticed all the threads here complaining about how hard it is to get a nice law career? Even the JD/MBAs in my bschool class had a hell of a time.
post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by TKJTG View Post
If you decide to go the education route, do NOT go into a straight MS/PhD program for the hard sciences. These are DEAD END. There are only so many tenure tract jobs out there and more than likely you'll be stuck doing post-doc after post-doc. On top of that, your salary won't be much different than what you make now and it will certainly be more difficult.

Also, this isn't true for sciences that have industry jobs. There are plenty of chemistry and biology industry jobs out there, and the salary increases from BS to PhD can be massive (3x or more). Unemployment averages 2% for chem PhD's in the US, and was only 4.5% during the height of the recession.

Academics is certainly a rough path, and I wouldn't advise someone to go into physics/astronomy/etc, but there are hard sciences with very good job prospects outside of academics.
post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by TKJTG View Post
If you decide to go the education route, do NOT go into a straight MS/PhD program for the hard sciences. These are DEAD END. There are only so many tenure tract jobs out there and more than likely you'll be stuck doing post-doc after post-doc. On top of that, your salary won't be much different than what you make now and it will certainly be more difficult.

Of the hard science PhDs I know, very few ended up staying in Academica. Either they are in various science-related jobs in the private sector, or they went into finance where their quantitative abilities are well valued - especially if their degree was in physics.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Milpool View Post
Law nearly guarantees a nice career as soon as you graduate??? Really? Noticed all the threads here complaining about how hard it is to get a nice law career? Even the JD/MBAs in my bschool class had a hell of a time.

Top 15 or law degree from somewhere else? If it is not one of the top schools, in law it really makes a big difference.
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by philosophe View Post
If you're really feeling bored or burned out, you should leave teaching, which works best when it's a labor of love.

Be careful, though, about taking on a lot of debt for a career change.

+1 to both points. I get bored. But what helps is to love the students. That is absolutely essential.

And I wouldn't commit to the time and money it takes to go to grad school unless I was sure I wanted to enter or continue in that field.

Why don't you take a semester or a year off, travel and reflect? I'd ask myself what I loved and would do w/o getting paid.

Then I'd think about how I could do that and get paid. We do need to eat!
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by FtRoyalty View Post
Sorry about another ubiquitous career advice/feedback thread... I know there are a couple current and/or former teachers on here, but I'll open this up to others as well. I am currently in my seventh year of teaching English and coaching, but I am beginning to get bored. I enjoy my students and have had success in the profession, but the monotony is beginning to catch up with me. The usual lateral moves of administration and guidance do not appeal to me. I just renewed my teaching license, so I have five years. For the former teachers, what careers did you transition into? Note: I have a couple graduate credits in instructional technology and thinking about getting a masters.
I'm in my 5th year, my plan is to get my masters ASAP. My goal is University professor, would that appeal to you? Having leighway in what/how you teach makes all the difference in the enjoyment. Now, what to do a masters in, that's something I haven't quite figured out...
post #24 of 27
Thread Starter 
Thanks to all for the replies. As I said, I enjoy teaching and working with kids, but at the same time, I'm tired of the same annual routine and putting in my years just to break 40k. However, I'm not ruling out a grade-level change for an older audience. I probably wouldn't have gotten into teaching if I did not have a strong desire to coach, but the time commitment is getting excessive for a stipend of a little over 2k. It was fun when I was younger, but I feel like I've put in my time and should move on with my career. If I walked away now, I would probably miss coaching more than teaching. That said, I can be a volunteer coach anywhere with my experience if my schedule allowed it.

One of my Christmas break goals is to get out some grad school info and to send off a few resumes. I have worked a lot with technology but lack the formal education to really market it as a skill. That said, there are a few professional development and technology curriculum coordinator positions nearby.

Out of curiousity, what are your thoughts on corporate trainers?
post #25 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by TKJTG View Post
If you decide to go the education route, do NOT go into a straight MS/PhD program for the hard sciences. These are DEAD END. There are only so many tenure tract jobs out there and more than likely you'll be stuck doing post-doc after post-doc. On top of that, your salary won't be much different than what you make now and it will certainly be more difficult.

yea, take this guy's advice. Stay away from the hard sciences (I don't like competition and there's already plenty of it)
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by TKJTG View Post
If you decide to go the education route, do NOT go into a straight MS/PhD program for the hard sciences. These are DEAD END. There are only so many tenure tract jobs out there and more than likely you'll be stuck doing post-doc after post-doc.

This is what I've been hearing. It's weird, for years there's been careers that guidance counselors, profs, bosses, etc, have been trying to get me into. I've worked with lawyers, and they (along with my school counselor) said I'd be great. A couple profs saw a future in academia for me, and all my friends and family believe I'm destined to be a teacher. But every single career path seems to be full for the next few decades.....

In Canada, teaching is ridiculously overfilled, and I've heard that 50 percent of teachers in Ontario are currently out of work. And Bachelor of Educ. programs are still extremely competitive to get in to.
post #27 of 27
Re law school -- check out the New York Times' story on law school graduates this week. Should scare you away, unless you get into an Ivy School or equivalent (U of C, Stanford, NYU, etc.)

Re other option -- I've touted this field before on SF, but my wife's career track would be great for former teachers, and there are several who go into it: development work (i.e., fundraising for non-profits).

1. Many non-profits are educational (private schools, universities, colleges), so being a former teacher is actually beneficial, though teaching in a private setting or at the college level is more so since you'll understand the educational process more.

2. It's counter-cyclical, as non-profits must hire to raise money when times are tough.

3. If you're very, very good and high level, you can do well ($500k is not unheard of), though most people are in high five figures where we live (NYC area).

4. There's a weird ethic of taking care of your employees, so even the most benign bosses are considered ruthless and cruel, and are often moved along. Firing someone is extremely rare. My wife hates her boss yet gets anniversary gifts and Christmas gifts from her that routinely cost $100+.

5. It's absolutely filled with women, so there are plenty of opportunities to hook up and easy advancement as they quit to have kids.

6. They have some amazing perks at time. My wife gets 7 weeks of vacation and about 20 holidays. Others get 1.5 time off if they work after hours. If you work at a university, you often get free tuition to take classes (my wife has former colleagues who got free grad or professional school degrees). Free food and free booze are common.

7. The hours are shocking. My wife works 9 - 4:30. In summer, she gets Fridays off. She never works nights or weekends and if she did, she'd get more time off.

8. One type of development work -- major gift officers -- is basically flying around the country and schmoozing with rich people in the hopes they cough up big checks. All you do is eat at nice restaurants and chat up richies and oldies. It's considered one of the "tougher" jobs in the field.

9. If you want, you can work for a "save the world" non-profit in line with whatever your interests or beliefs are. You'll feel good about yourself. Or work for another non-profit that others love and it makes your life good -- a friend worked at a NYC animal hospital and tearful donors would stroll and and say "you saved my beloved pooch -- here's $100,000 and a bunch of gift cards for the staff!"

Seriously, it's like the world's best kept secret.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Business, Careers & Education
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Business, Careers & Education › Seven Year Career Itch: Teaching