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Slim climbing pants

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
This seemed more exercise related than fashion related, but forgive me if this question doesn't belong here.

I just started climbing a couple months ago, and since then I've been searching for a slim-fitting climbing pant. Surprisingly, this has been almost impossible. I'm 5'9" and 145 lbs, and usually a 30 waist/30 inseam in most athletic brands. And when I do find a pair that small, they pretty much universally have a 9" leg opening or greater, making them look more like parachute pants than climbing pants on me.

Anyone have any suggestions? I'm looking for something durable, stretchy, and most of all, slim. Am I going to have to resort to women's sizes?
post #2 of 22
Climbers roll their pant legs. You can buy Prana stuff but it will just be normal/yoga-ish. No climbing brand makes pants for climbing, the market doesn't really exist.

Hate to say it, but I climb in old fucked up Sevens cause they have so much elastic in them. That and some really worn in levi's. Rolling the pant legs is going to be your best option, I'm pretty sure.
post #3 of 22
You need special pants for climbing? Honest question here, not snark....
post #4 of 22
Several outdoor clothing manufacturers make some pretty slim fitting softshell pants (high tech, stretchy, breathable fabrics) that are excellent for climbing, hiking, mountaineering, etc. The Marmot Rockstar comes to mind, as well as anything by Arc'teryx.
post #5 of 22
Look at Patagonia's clothing. They've been making serious clothing for serious outdoor sports, especially climbing, for 30 years. You cannot go wrong with their products.
post #6 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by werdswerf View Post
This seemed more exercise related than fashion related, but forgive me if this question doesn't belong here.

I just started climbing a couple months ago, and since then I've been searching for a slim-fitting climbing pant. Surprisingly, this has been almost impossible. I'm 5'9" and 145 lbs, and usually a 30 waist/30 inseam in most athletic brands. And when I do find a pair that small, they pretty much universally have a 9" leg opening or greater, making them look more like parachute pants than climbing pants on me.

Anyone have any suggestions? I'm looking for something durable, stretchy, and most of all, slim. Am I going to have to resort to women's sizes?



post #7 of 22
Hey, what's up man. I started climbing about half a year ago and picked up asphalt grey northface outbound pants. I think we're about the same size. these are pricey but quite steller. They are slim but stretchy, soft but insanely durable (Walking through needly brush and rubbing against rock doesn't put a dent in them), they breathe, sun resistant, quick drying, and have a harness friendly pocket. They also don't take much space in your pack. I chillax at home in them since theyre that comfy. Should be good for yoga when I take it up at some point. Could be found somewhere here: http://www.thenorthface.com/catalog/...#1292743909075 Btw I got them at REI with 10% promotion, dunno if you have them or equivalent in NC.
post #8 of 22
a Vancouver company competes directly with arcteryx, they're called Westcomb and they make climbing pants
post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chiro75 View Post
Look at Patagonia's clothing. They've been making serious clothing for serious outdoor sports, especially climbing, for 30 years. You cannot go wrong with their products.
Like the above poster said, Patagonia is great, as are some of the other companies listed. Arc Teryx is great, and has a really cool logo also. That being said, here is my suggestion regarding climbing pants. I think the original poster should get some "ripstop" cargo pants for climbing, here is why this is what I believe: It's part principle, part personal rock climbing experience: In the last decade or so, (i'm sure that many of you know this)... the specialized fabric/outdoor clothing industry has become very popular...even for non sportsman. This makes a lot of sense. Why? People care about quality..."form and function" if you will...and the general public is starting to learn what backpackers have always known...If you are outside in a storm...you don't want to get caught in cotton...or any other fabric that loses the ability to retain heat when wet. Hence, the general public started "going to the source", and buying high end items from REI,EMS, whatever. The following is my thoughts on why I think slim pants are a bad idea for climbing As far as I'm concerned, this stuff is getting rediculous...(this is not directly meant for the Original Poster at all)...(just my comment on the matter).... Once the general public hopped on the band wagon, every single sorority girl, financial services guy, or whatever started buying North Face Jackets (fleece usually)...which is great b/c they are quality products. (more on that in a minute.) Because of this... backpackers started buying purchasing gear from other non mainstream companies such as Marmot. Then when the general public "took" that from the outdoor community, some of us started purchasing more products at Patagonia (which I certainly admit that Patagonia had been popular in very fashion forward areas for a while...probably at least ten years in NYC.) Eventually, many of the great outdoor clothing companies went mainstream, so alot of climbers, backpackers, etc...switched to mountain hardwear. (a company that makes dome tents for everest base camp). Well, now many people wear Mountain Hardwear. ...What's happening now, is that popular and functional are one in the same. A cynosure of civilization if you will. Because of the general publics increasing trend of purchasing from these companies, and in order to differentiate themselves from people who had the money to buy every new jacket that came out; many backpackers, rock climbers, kayakers, etc...started going back to incorporating some "regular" or less specialized clothing into their gear. Maybe just a pair of jeans for base camp, a carhartt jacket, or a poncho from REI. I for instance did the following: B/c of this...I went to a military surplus store and bought the military version of a typical north face fleece jacket. It has better zippers, better zipper pulls, better shoulder pads/elbow pads...and it has "pit zips"...a zipper under the armpit to regulate temperature. This surplus jacket was 40 bucks. I wear it with pride in REI, no logo...outstanding quality, solid black, and no logo. I take pride in this jacket..it's better in general to North face fleece jackets, which are usually only rated at 100 or 200 weight fleece and they are expensive. Mine is 300 wt fleece I think. I wear this with pride. So to the original poster, of course, you should wear whatever makes you feel good...and yes, you can buy all types of "yoga" like clothing as the other gentleman said...but why would you? I climb, and I don't know why you would want to restrict your movement? Why would you decrease your level of climbing safety. (yes, i understand that some of these fabrics are very stretchy..no doubt)...but why? Why compromise safety. Those slim, stretchy pants...won't save you from being cut by a speckled granite wall. Get some ripstop, military grade cargo pants..the kind that paramedics wear. Rock climbing is about being an individual, testing your limits, and also having fun with your friends. Be Original in your clothing choices regarding the sport. My point...all of this new age, fashionable yoga outdoor clothing like Prana is crap. let people envy you for your climbing skill and technique, not for your style...if you want to get props and respect from real climbers, buy a nice black diamond harness, or some expensive carabiners...anything but the clothing. Happy Holidays and peace on earth.
post #10 of 22
"let people envy you for your climbing skill and technique, not for your style...if you want to get props and respect from real climbers, buy a nice black diamond harness, or some expensive carabiners...anything but the clothing."

Agree. In the early nineties, I was blessed to have the opportunity to climb a great deal, first rock, then ice/mountaineering. Sport climbing was starting to take hold, and everyone was kitted-out in spandex tights. Now, I was the guy that started with 50m of twisted Goldline from the army/navy store, used for top roping. Also wore levis, a bit baggy, which eventually each of my three pairs would have a.) both knes blown out; and b.) left and right belt loops blow from wearing harnesses. The jeans got baggier, the fitter one was, and I chose the trad route, which would have meant laughs if you wore spandex (unless you were Lynn Hill; oh, to belay her).

Work on your technique. No need to look the part, your climbing skills deem what is needed to scale faster/higher. Enjoy the greatest sport on earth.
post #11 of 22
I would think baggy pants are what you want since they give freedom of movement. You could wear compression pants if you're proud of your junk.
post #12 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by notalwaysrig View Post
Like the above poster said, Patagonia is great, as are some of the other companies listed. Arc Teryx is great, and has a really cool logo also. That being said, here is my suggestion regarding climbing pants.

I think the original poster should get some "ripstop" cargo pants for climbing, here is why this is what I believe: It's part principle, part personal rock climbing experience:



In the last decade or so, (i'm sure that many of you know this)... the specialized fabric/outdoor clothing industry has become very popular...even for non sportsman.

--snip--

The following is my thoughts on why I think slim pants are a bad idea for climbing

As far as I'm concerned, this stuff is getting rediculous...(this is not directly meant for the Original Poster at all)...(just my comment on the matter)....

Once the general public hopped on the band wagon, every single sorority girl, financial services guy, or whatever started buying North Face Jackets (fleece usually)...which is great b/c they are quality products. (more on that in a minute.)

Because of this... backpackers started buying purchasing gear from other non mainstream companies such as Marmot. Then when the general public "took" that from the outdoor community, some of us started purchasing more products at Patagonia (which I certainly admit that Patagonia had been popular in very fashion forward areas for a while...probably at least ten years in NYC.)

Eventually, many of the great outdoor clothing companies went mainstream, so alot of climbers, backpackers, etc...switched to mountain hardwear. (a company that makes dome tents for everest base camp).

Well, now many people wear Mountain Hardwear.

...What's happening now, is that popular and functional are one in the same. A cynosure of civilization if you will.

Because of the general publics increasing trend of purchasing from these companies, and in order to differentiate themselves from people who had the money to buy every new jacket that came out; many backpackers, rock climbers, kayakers, etc...started going back to incorporating some "regular" or less specialized clothing into their gear. Maybe just a pair of jeans for base camp, a carhartt jacket, or a poncho from REI.

I for instance did the following: B/c of this...I went to a military surplus store and bought the military version of a typical north face fleece jacket. It has better zippers, better zipper pulls, better shoulder pads/elbow pads...and it has "pit zips"...a zipper under the armpit to regulate temperature. This surplus jacket was 40 bucks. I wear it with pride in REI, no logo...outstanding quality, solid black, and no logo.

I take pride in this jacket..it's better in general to North face fleece jackets, which are usually only rated at 100 or 200 weight fleece and they are expensive. Mine is 300 wt fleece I think.

I wear this with pride.


So to the original poster, of course, you should wear whatever makes you feel good...and yes, you can buy all types of "yoga" like clothing as the other gentleman said...but why would you?

I climb, and I don't know why you would want to restrict your movement? Why would you decrease your level of climbing safety. (yes, i understand that some of these fabrics are very stretchy..no doubt)...but why? Why compromise safety. Those slim, stretchy pants...won't save you from being cut by a speckled granite wall.


Get some ripstop, military grade cargo pants..the kind that paramedics wear. Rock climbing is about being an individual, testing your limits, and also having fun with your friends. Be Original in your clothing choices regarding the sport. My point...all of this new age, fashionable yoga outdoor clothing like Prana is crap. let people envy you for your climbing skill and technique, not for your style...if you want to get props and respect from real climbers, buy a nice black diamond harness, or some expensive carabiners...anything but the clothing.

Happy Holidays and peace on earth.

Arc'teryx has a great logo. ..awesome reason to buy it.

So you recommend some regular cargo pants. Which is fine, but you're reasoning is ridiculous.

You describe a decade of enthusiasts embracing a brand until such a time as it's incorporated into mainstream use.
First North Face (fleece), then Marmot, then Patagonia, then Mountain Hardwear and now enthusiasts are giving up and going climbing in jeans. ..and because of this cycle of adopting a brand to identify as an individual with credibility within the community only to abandon it when the non climber Freds catch on to the trend you've given up entirely on the plethora of options available for suitable athletic gear because you can't be proud of it as it no longer sets you apart.

Instead, you've gone the army surplus route.
("˜cause that's Original. No hiker, climber or outdoorsman has thought of that before) and have assessed the "new age" yoga stuff like Prana to be crap. Despite being made from pretty much the same materials/methods as the non "new age" brands like arc'teryx, craft, mountain hardwear, chlorophyl, etc etc..

Basically, your advice to not get hooked up on a brand or sport specific clothing is somewhat reasonable, but your reasoning for it, makes you sound like a idiot. Like a kid who will only listen to indie bands that nobody has heard of and slags as sell outs them when they sign to a major label.
post #13 of 22
ha, leave it to SF to turn every thread into an existential debate... My favorite climbing pants ever are the long, dorky Gramiccis with the diamond crotch. Narrow leg openings. I don't like wide legs b/c I can't see my feet. I bet a small would fit you well, even if they're not stretchy. I have climbed in jeans (chafing!) and surplus German army pants with drawstring legs (hot! and too many pockets to snag), but both are cheap options.
post #14 of 22
Gramiccis! The happy medium. Had a pair of these ane verve tights. Diamond crotch, look like khakis. Excellent choice.
post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by notalwaysrig View Post
Like the above poster said, Patagonia is great, as are some of the other companies listed. Arc Teryx is great, and has a really cool logo also. That being said, here is my suggestion regarding climbing pants.

I think the original poster should get some "ripstop" cargo pants for climbing, here is why this is what I believe: It's part principle, part personal rock climbing experience:



....

Happy Holidays and peace on earth.

What the fuck does it matter if some random dude is wearing TNF or Mountain Hardware? - real climbers just use functional gear and don't give a shit about anything else. You can't wear jeans on an ice climb nor Carhartt around base camp when you are counting ounces. Maybe if you are credit card camping...

The reason TNF became unpopular in climber circles is that they took forever to update their stuff and fell behind - they didn't have solid product for a long time that used Gore Tex Pro (and they still don't have eVent). Patagonia was a yuppy brand for a lot more than 10 years and I don't know too many climbers that wear that stuff.

Slim stretch pants are better for climbing because they don't catch on shit and protect your skin when you are scraping over slab. Those puffy pockets on cargo pants suck for technical work.
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