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Cuffed vs uncuffed - that is the question - Page 2

post #16 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by aportnoy
Cuffs (a big 1 3/4" mama) on all trousers that skew even remotley to the dressy side, save, of course, formal trousers.


1 3/4 is for mama's boys. 2 inches (I'm thinking of going 2 1/4 soon ) rock!!
post #17 of 31
I dunno - I like cuffs with a certain look - there was a gorgeous photo this summer of a beautifully cuffed pair of pants falling on a John Lobb wholecut, and there is a certain elegance to them. On the other hand, they can give the appearance of old-man-ness if improperly executed. I don't think they belong on odd trousers.
post #18 of 31
Either way, if you're going to do it, do it right. Don't let your tailor put wimpy 1" cuffs on there (some will, if you let them). They should be at least 1-1/2" for a short or average height person or bigger for taller people. I like 1-3/4"-2" myself.
post #19 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel
1 3/4 is for mama's boys. 2 inches (I'm thinking of going 2 1/4 soon ) rock!!


Yes, I'm feeling it Ed. I can remember when my beloved, now long retired, salesman/sherpa at Barneys told me 1 1/4 cuffs are for bon vivants, not adults.
post #20 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakewolf
I was buying nice wool trousers for use with sports coats for this autumn and didn't noticed that the blue one had one pleat...

i normally use flat fronts... I was thinking in return it and change it for a flat front, but I could maybe cuff them and use them with sports coats anyway...

Do you think is OK to cuff odd trousers ?

my only cuffed ones are 2 DB old style suits one has double pleats charcoal chalkstripe and the other is a blue windowpane one pleat...
yes
post #21 of 31
Used to not like them. My mind changed. As Connery's wife said, "Never say never again." I think I'll be getting 2" cuffs on most everything from now on. They help me not look so long for one thing, and make up for the fact that I rarely get pleats.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivan Kipling
I never cuff evening trousers.
Well, that's a given. I've not known anyone to do it.
post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiecollector
I agree, if you are on the fence then cuff em, cuz you can always undo it.

However, I just dont think cuffs look good on people 29 on down. You want to make yourself look more sleek and show off the body as a whole instead of the shoes. Then, as stuff starts to sag, you'll want to draw attention to the cuff links and shoes.

I address the "sleekness" issue differently. I have the length adjusted to be just barely breaking at the contact with the hem and the shoe. In my view, it is that large sagging bag of cloth that breaks up the line, not the cuff. Anyway, " shakin' not breakin' " is my preference whether cuffed or uncuffed. Generally, the only ones I do not cuff are the khakis. It really is a question of personal preference though.
post #23 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jovan
Used to not like them. My mind changed. As Connery's wife said, "Never say never again."

I think I'll be getting 2" cuffs on most everything from now on. They help me not look so long for one thing, and make up for the fact that I rarely get pleats.

Well, that's a given. I've not known anyone to do it.

I have. Don't ask.
post #24 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiecollector
I agree, if you are on the fence then cuff em, cuz you can always undo it.

However, I just dont think cuffs look good on people 29 on down. You want to make yourself look more sleek and show off the body as a whole instead of the shoes. Then, as stuff starts to sag, you'll want to draw attention to the cuff links and shoes.

I turn 30 in a couple of days. I best be off getting all my suits cuffed.

For the record, I still want to show off my body when I'm 30 and perhaps even when I'm 40 or 50.
post #25 of 31
I have a weird system about whether to get cuffs or not. If I think that the pants or the suit they go along with is a more modern, cool type of suit I get it made without cuffs. If I think the suit is a more conservative business type of suit, then I get cuffs put on. All this is regardless of whether the pants have pleats or not.

So, for example, the pants of all of my Cornelianis have pleats, but they are all uncuffed because I see these suits as more "cool" (for lack of a better word) suits. In addition, the Isaia I just got is a plain navy with flat front pants and I got this one uncuffed because the suit has a cool slim cut. On the other hand, on my Hickey-Freeman hand-tailored, which has a much more conservative cut than the Cornelianis or Isaia, I got the pants cuffed. So anyway, that's my method.
post #26 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivan Kipling
I have. Don't ask.
Aww, you naughty boy.
post #27 of 31
I Like Cuffs when - You have Nice Shoes to show off - Pant leg/opening are Slim cut (Shows off the nice shoes heheh) - Pant Length is just abit shorter of one break
post #28 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toiletduck
I Like Cuffs when

- You have Nice Shoes to show off
- Pant leg/opening are Slim cut (Shows off the nice shoes heheh)
- Pant Length is just abit shorter of one break

That's weird - we have the exact opposite criteria. I get my pants hemmed with no cuff for the same reasons you get them cuffed.
post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by odoreater
That's weird - we have the exact opposite criteria. I get my pants hemmed with no cuff for the same reasons you get them cuffed.

post #30 of 31
In general I believe when wearing pleated trousers it is a preference issue, where one can choose cuffs OR plain bottom. A taller man should almost always choose cuffs when wearing pleated trousers - it just (in my opinion) looks better - and a wider cuff the taller the man is (GENERAL guidelines - at least 1.25" cuff for 5'7" and shorter, 1.5" - 1.75" cuff for 5'8" - 5'10", 1.75" - 2" for taller men). Flat front trousers should have a plain bottom, regardless of the width of the bottom of the leg. For lighter weight fabrics it is very beneficial to have ribboning sewn on the inside bottom of the legs by your tailor to add extra weight and enhance the drape of the pant and the overall silhouette. Also, it is correct that a plain bottom should have little to no break for a proper gentleman's trouser, whereas cuffed trousers should have a slight to moderate break.
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