or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › '70s Style.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

'70s Style. - Page 4

post #46 of 71
since it is fall...
post #47 of 71
I have to give the Black Eyed Peas "mad props" for taking outrageous clothes and making it look good on them. And most importantly... fitting!

Unfortunately most hip hoppers dont dress like this. The style doesn't have to agree with me, but dear god, is having the stuff fit too much to ask?




can't find a good example of any of the fubu and football jerzeez that I see on a day to day basis.


While looking for pics, I found this, which I kinda like actually in an "i want to get beat up" kinda way. The short tie I definitely like.:
post #48 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by gorgekko
I wish someone would take a shovel, take a good swing and cave in the head of the 1970s, and then bury it very deeply. The only thing I hate more than the 1970s and its "style" is the late 1960s.

Press
post #49 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiecollector
While looking for pics, I found this, which I kinda like actually in an "i want to get beat up" kinda way. The short tie I definitely like.:

English public schoolboy gone wrong look. This is actually very chic in a hilarious sort of way.
post #50 of 71
Yes, it seems like there is very little style information from the 1970s that is valid today excepts for the don'ts.
post #51 of 71
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by designprofessor
1.I like this bold pattern shirt under the jacket. A bit of a nod to the Peacock Revolution.

2. I like the recent write up in Men's Vogue about Warhol's classic Brooks Bros. rep tie. -next on my purchase list.

3. I'm sorry, Salvador Dali, just looks more bizarre with each posted picture. I like the eccentricity and all, but seriously, to be locked in a room with the guy might just be a little too intense. And any pictures of him with the oxygen tube up his nose just looks like some monstrosity from a David Lynch film.
Dali was the ultimate fashionista. Of course, Lynch films are also very stylish in their way. Ben from "Blue Velvet" was fantastic.
post #52 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitonbrioni
Yes, it seems like there is very little style information from the 1970s that is valid today excepts for the don'ts.

It strikes me as being a time of rather adventurous sartorial experimentation on the heels of the 60s psychedelic era. Limits were pushed and much was discovered about what is aesthetically displeasing in an absolute sense.

To paraphrase Stendahl, never were fashion and beauty more distant from one another.
post #53 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jovan
I'm sorry, '70s and style in the same sentence do not compute.
Please enter in a valid command: _



I quite agree. I was horrified to see bellbottoms -- excuse me, flairs -- make a big comeback. Just wait until the updated liesure suit pops up...Lee Majors shall riiiiiiiise again!
post #54 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
Dali was the ultimate fashionista. Of course, Lynch films are also very stylish in their way. Ben from "Blue Velvet" was fantastic.


And of course "Frank"- who was originally supposed to be breathing helium -but even that was too weird for Hopper.


*breathes nitrous oxide* ..."it's dark now"...
post #55 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nantucket Red
It strikes me as being a time of rather adventurous sartorial experimentation on the heels of the 60s psychedelic era. Limits were pushed and much was discovered about what is aesthetically displeasing in an absolute sense.

To paraphrase Stendahl, never were fashion and beauty more distant from one another.

Yes, the same decade that gave us turquoise shag carpeting and the AMC Pacer.
post #56 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomasso

If what I said didn't make sense to you then we live in different worlds and cannot bridge the gap.
post #57 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomasso
Aww, you're still doing the .wav replies! That's so cute.
post #58 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teacher


I quite agree. I was horrified to see bellbottoms -- excuse me, flairs -- make a big comeback. Just wait until the updated liesure suit pops up...Lee Majors shall riiiiiiiise again!

I love bellbottoms. They are a classic that never completely goes away, and their history goes back to long before the 1970s. They are a sort of affluent revolution. They are a sign of liberty and, sorry, America. Oppressive regimes throughout the world have clamped down on bellbottoms as symbols of US imperialism and Western style excess. The mullahs outlawed them in Iran after the revolution. Bellbottoms were banned in China throughout the Cultural Revolution. As economic reforms came in with the early eighties, so did bell-bottoms. Throughout the period of economic opening, bellbottoms have represented freedom of self-expression and individualism. Whether you like these things are not, they are what bellbottoms (and western culture) represent.

Working in a professional environment, I certainly don't wear them, but the horror of them seems ever-so-slightly Mullahist or Maoist to me, since I have ties to both Iran and China. Bellbottoms are more than just a fashion disaster from the seventies. I know that they are overly flamboyant and tasteless, etc., but, as Americans, we should understand what they represent globally before pronouncing them evil.
post #59 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by designprofessor
Yes, the same decade that gave us turquoise shag carpeting and the AMC Pacer.

And the Pacer was hailed as being the future of automotive design.

Let's not forget that perennial crowd-pleaser, Barry Manilow.
post #60 of 71
well, he did make it through the rain.

i like '70s stuff for the nostalgia it brings to me. i was a young child in the '70s, so the nostalgia is about the innocent, carefree pleasure of being a kid. not only does it come from fashion, but also other elements of the culture: crafts like macrame, ojos de dios, homemade pottery; wood paneling; shag carpets; conversation pits; groovy supergraphics; and the color orange, for some reason. i think it was because we had orange-brown plaid tweed furniture.

/andrew
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › '70s Style.