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Bespoke Overcoat - Page 11

post #151 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by KObalto View Post

I love the coat Despos posted with the sash. Can't find the pic right now. Quite a few on here did not like it.
EDIT: Here it is:
467

This an excerpt from the article that inspired this coat

"The most distinguished garment of all is the polo coat itself. Double-breasted and patch-pocketed, with a half-belted back, frame pockets, set-in sleeves with cuffs, and swelled seams, the camel-hair polo is the aristocrat of topcoats.
At the end of the 19th century, polo players began to devise a casual robe-like coat to throw over their shoulders between periods of play (called chukkers) in a match, to keep warm while waiting for the game to resume. At first any old sports jacket or overcoat was pressed into service, but then players started to develop ideas about how the coat should function, and these ideas came to be called "wait" coats by English tailors. Early on they were indeed just like bathrobes: an enveloping blanket-like garment with wide sleeves, and a sash closure instead of buttons. In the 1920s, when international polo matches began being held on Long Island, the English wait coats did not go unnoticed.
There was definite swagger and cavalier deshabille about them, combining as they did the comfort of a robe, the warmth of a topcoat, and the aura of an expensive and elegant sport. Highly appealing to undergraduates of the era, these new "polo" coats were soon seen sauntering down Princeton's Nassau Street, and around New Haven and Cambridge. By 1930 the polo coat had evolved to what it is today, and - as sure a sartorial barometer of success as you could find -- it was the most popular outer coat at the Yale-Princeton football game that year.
It's success can be accounted for by the peculiarly American penchant for clothes that combine elegance with comfort, that casual dressiness that has always typified the college campus. It also puts polo gear in the forefront of the casual revolution we are now experiencing."

Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

Cream OC reminds me of 1920s gangsters.

This is gangster? puzzled.gif
I clearly don't watch enough old movies.

464

464

Have a piece of double faced cloth in the shop, will make it up in this style but unlined and with a surprise twist. Thanks for posting this.

It will be reversilble with non-patch pockets and the double faces will be of different colours/patterns but on the lapels the reverse side will not be visible, all done by sheer force of will? biggrin.gif
post #152 of 233
It will be reversilble with non-patch pockets and the double faces will be of different colours/patterns but on the lapels the reverse side will not be visible, all done by sheer force of will? biggrin.gif[/quote]

Close, but with such high expectations you are sure to be disappointed. It's a very simple twist and it's a technical thing rather than styling. Not sure how to do it until I try. Haven't worked double faced cloth and want to try something new.
post #153 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

Don Lockwood (Gene Kelly) wears a great version of a wrap coat, in white, in the beginning of Singing in the Rain. In fact, that movie has a lot of the over the top Hollywood dressing veddy English look.

263
An easy to find still, though not a good view of the coat.
post #154 of 233
For no particular reason, the Prince's tweed polo:

521960148ye.jpg
post #155 of 233
Isn't that technically not a polo because it has buttons?
post #156 of 233
A Polo has buttons. A wrap coat does not (or they are hidden).
post #157 of 233
Hm, I see. I thought a polo had to have no buttons and be belted.
post #158 of 233
Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post

It will be reversilble with non-patch pockets and the double faces will be of different colours/patterns but on the lapels the reverse side will not be visible, all done by sheer force of will? biggrin.gif

Close, but with such high expectations you are sure to be disappointed. It's a very simple twist and it's a technical thing rather than styling. Not sure how to do it until I try. Haven't worked double faced cloth and want to try something new.
[/QUOTE]

(how can I be disappointed, it's your project smile.gif )
How can it be close when it's a simple twist though, haha?
So what will it be?
What I described is a pure technical thing, especially keeping the lapels in the same colour with the different coloured/patterned double face fabric on a reversible coat.
Actually it is rather impossible^^.
post #159 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

Don Lockwood (Gene Kelly) wears a great version of a wrap coat, in white, in the beginning of Singing in the Rain. In fact, that movie has a lot of the over the top Hollywood dressing veddy English look.

263
An easy to find still, though not a good view of the coat.

This is not the authentic Polo styling, this has slash pockets, not framed patch/flap pockets, straps on sleeve and no cuff, different lapels too
post #160 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sander View Post

That NC pic looks so great.
Have to agree though; I wouldn't wear it today. Gathers too much attention.
Has anyone seen the documentary about Prince Charles (The Green Prince or something?) - he wears a camel colored coat that looks absolutely great; just the right shade especially. Many shades of camel make caucasian faces look too red or too pale.
I haven't seen the documentary (link?), but i have to disagree on the first bit. What looks dated in this pic is the surrounding, not the coat itself. I would wear it any day without hesitation. We could discuss his collar, tie, hair, everything. But to me, the coat itself is the essence of timelessness, don't you think?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

That looks gray to me, not cream.
I would say it looks grey, too.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cravate_Noire View Post

[
What I described is a pure technical thing, especially keeping the lapels in the same colour with the different coloured/patterned double face fabric on a reversible coat.
Actually it is rather impossible^^.
Oh, it is possible, you just need some special effects and cheating, see James Bond: Live and let die.
post #161 of 233
Quote:
Oh, it is possible, you just need some special effects and cheating, see James Bond: Live and let die.

You know who I am?
post #162 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cravate_Noire View Post

Quote:
Oh, it is possible, you just need some special effects and cheating, see James Bond: Live and let die.
You know who I am?

Let's put it this way: have some vague idea about your identity in my mind.
post #163 of 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

263
An easy to find still, though not a good view of the coat.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post

This is not the authentic Polo styling, this has slash pockets, not framed patch/flap pockets, straps on sleeve and no cuff, different lapels too


Yes. That is why I said it is an example of a wrap coat, much like your tan cashmere one.
post #164 of 233
Isn't the lady to the left of Kelly, Larry Mondello's mom?
post #165 of 233
I'm planning to get a navy wool overcoat made, probably by one of the traveling tailors. I think I'd like to get a quilt lining on the inside for extra insulation. Will they all be able to do that? I also still can't figure out after reading the thread what price range to expect for a mid-priced wool coat from one of the traveling HK tailors. Can anyone share past prices for an overcoat they've had made recently?
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