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What Movies Are You Watching Lately - Page 895

post #13411 of 14734
Quote:
Originally Posted by gettoasty View Post

This came on a twice while I was flipping through channels...can you help me understand one thing? Why isn't Stallone cold?

Sigh haven't you worked it out: he has big brass cohonies which make him impervious to the cold.
post #13412 of 14734

Watched Her (2013), for a second time. Easily one of my favorite films this past decade.

post #13413 of 14734
Enjoyed the 70mm roadshow version of Hateful Eight.

Good performances all around. My GF commented that watching it felt like reading a book, and I'm inclined to agree with that.

Nice to have an intermission!
post #13414 of 14734
Although I will say, modern movie theaters have made some reasonable improvements to the experience.

Saw it at a local independent theater that does a 70mm film festival and had just built a new, larger, screen and installed a fancy sound system upgrade.

Beautiful old theater, but even with the upgrades some elements were lacking.
Modern multiplexes may be ugly as sin, but the furnishings are designed for the movie experience, not to look pretty. Sound doesn't have hard surfaces to bounce off, and stadium seating is handy, especially as screens get larger. The theater's new screen was nice, but it was hard to look at comfortably. Had to choose between sitting close enough to really feel the width of the 70mm format and sitting far enough back that you don't have to crane your neck upwards.
post #13415 of 14734

I watched Black Mass last night, a good gansters movie, but above all, J Deep is fantastic in this movie

post #13416 of 14734

 

Adventurous take on a screenplay. The screenwriter turned in a screenplay about himself creating the screenplay.  I enjoyed it. The end is a bit flimsy, but I could live with it.

 

 

Still stands up as an enjoyable film. I suppose there was some subtle critique on privatization of public servants and Reaganomics here as well. Can't imagine why they wanted to remake it (although I never seen it, and really don't plan to).

 

 

1997 was a good year for films wasn't it?

 

 

Reminds me of The Gunfighter with Gregory Peck. Well done western drama. Story couldn't have been better considering what they were going for.

 

 

Ok. Something somewhat recent for a change. But I liked this film. It does touch your heart in one of those places films seldom reach.

 

 

Probably one of the most erotic films I can remember. Right up with Woman in the Dunes. The film is fresh as hell for 1964. Beautiful colors too.

 

 

Corruption in the business world leads to the deaths of a bunch of junior executives while the real big shots still rake in the kickbacks. A man schemes to punish all the wrongdoers.

 

 

I got the sort of feeling this was like an adaptation of some country folk story of sorts. A city tax collector inherits some farmland and attempts to be a farmer with the help of a friendly neighbor. But his neighbor actually intends to sabotage his attempts so that he can buy his land on the cheap. Great acting jobs here too.

 

Oh, I rewatched Pepe Le Moko. Yeah, that film is actually good. But some other 'classics' didn't really appeal very much to me:

 

Jurassic Park (I was hoping all the characters would be eaten by the dinosaurs. Sadly pretty much any character with more than 6 lines doesn't die).

The Terminator (This was like watching like some 80s Eastern European B movie)

North by Northwest (Dialogue was embarrassing. Should've gotten Billy Wilder or his screenwriters here.)

Goodfellas (I never liked this film the first time I saw it. I haven't changed my mind)

2001: A Space Odyssey (See above)

Shadow of a Doubt (Just dragged in my opinion. Especially after the reveal. I mean...why is there still like 25 minutes more to the film?)

The Untouchables (De Palma's just playing around with the camera, which is fine. But the story doesn't flow quite right and the memorable quotes don't have that zip when they are said. Something just seems to be wrong with the atmosphere of the scenes, unlike say Star Wars IV and which have generally pretty lame dialogue but the few good ones just give the scenes a jolt of energy).

post #13417 of 14734
Quote:
Originally Posted by ballmouse View Post




Adventurous take on a screenplay. The screenwriter turned in a screenplay about himself creating the screenplay.  I enjoyed it. The end is a bit flimsy, but I could live with it.

One of my favorite movies. I'll defend Nic Cage's acting talent based on this performance alone. The ending is actually a very thoughtful move by Kaufman. Think about the differences between the two brothers, and the kind of movie each of them is trying to make.
post #13418 of 14734
Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzy View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by ballmouse View Post




Adventurous take on a screenplay. The screenwriter turned in a screenplay about himself creating the screenplay.  I enjoyed it. The end is a bit flimsy, but I could live with it.

One of my favorite movies. I'll defend Nic Cage's acting talent based on this performance alone. The ending is actually a very thoughtful move by Kaufman. Think about the differences between the two brothers, and the kind of movie each of them is trying to make.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Oh I agree with that. I guess by ending I meant the part where the brothers are being hunted in the swamp. Thought that whole 'we got to kill them!' epiphany that Streep and Cooper had was a little odd.
post #13419 of 14734
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Again, it goes back to the brothers. Charlie is trying to come up with a complicated and nuanced screenplay about flowers, which is what the first part of the movie is like. Donald wants to make a very generic action thriller, which is what the end of the movie turns into. Since Charlie is the one who wrote this screenplay (both the actual one and the one in the movie), the ending is a sort of salute to his dead (fictional) brother.
post #13420 of 14734
Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzy View Post
  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Again, it goes back to the brothers. Charlie is trying to come up with a complicated and nuanced screenplay about flowers, which is what the first part of the movie is like. Donald wants to make a very generic action thriller, which is what the end of the movie turns into. Since Charlie is the one who wrote this screenplay (both the actual one and the one in the movie), the ending is a sort of salute to his dead (fictional) brother.

 

Ah! Nice explanation. I didn't catch this idea until you explained it.

post #13421 of 14734
Is it a tribute to his brother or the fact that at the point when the movie turns into a generic action movie his brother begins helping him with the screenplay?
post #13422 of 14734

Leviantan - Andreij Zvyagintsev (2014) 

 

 

Just loved this movie about disloyalty, betrayal and fighting for the wrong causes in a society in decay; this is the little man up against overwhelming problems and a corrupt system. The mayor wants his house, and has connections to the police, the court and the church. Up against this, our poor Job has few but no chances, but he fights on. Had he just discovered what is really important to him! It's not his house; it's his son and his wife, Not seeing that, he looses everything.

 

This is not only a political movie, it is just as much a personal drama; the main character who fights the unjust system, is just as bad to his family as the system is to him - thus confirming the oppressive system he is up against. In that way this is also a movie about personal guilt and responsibility - and the complicated limitations of the individual responsibility in society.

The move is very good directed, and suggests much more than spoon feed us. The acting is, as often in Russia, emminent. They are so pro, Hollywood go home!

And the filming! Mikhail Krichman has captured the Murmansk ambience and the nordic shadowless light night so much that I feel this movie could have been shoot in my neighbourhood. A beautiful and capturing  movie.

post #13423 of 14734
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roy Al View Post

Leviantan - Andreij Zvyagintsev (2014) 

 







Just loved this movie about disloyalty, betrayal and fighting for the wrong causes in a society in decay; this is the little man up against overwhelming problems and a corrupt system. The mayor wants his house, and has connections to the police, the court and the church. Up against this, our poor Job has few but no chances, but he fights on. Had he just discovered what is really important to him! It's not his house; it's his son and his wife, Not seeing that, he looses everything.



 



This is not only a political movie, it is just as much a personal drama; the main character who fights the unjust system, is just as bad to his family as the system is to him - thus confirming the oppressive system he is up against. In that way this is also a movie about personal guilt and responsibility - and the complicated limitations of the individual responsibility in society.



The move is very good directed, and suggests much more than spoon feed us. The acting is, as often in Russia, emminent. They are so pro, Hollywood go home!



And the filming! Mikhail Krichman has captured the Murmansk ambience and the nordic shadowless light night so much that I feel this movie could have been shoot in my neighbourhood. A beautiful and capturing  movie.



This was one film I really anticipated seeing last year and it did not disappoint. The real life story that was the basis of the fils narrative is weirdly fascinating but the corruption is 100% Russian. Dowloaded this from our cable provider and plan on watching it tonight. Your right about the visual esthetic of the film visually stunning.
post #13424 of 14734

I agree, Leviathan is a great film,I watched this last year, the corruption story must be 100% russian as you said

post #13425 of 14734

If this movie had been made in the west, it would fit the western ideology of the one good man against the bad system, and the good man succeeds and after a hard struggle.

In this (East-)European story he has really never a chance; the forces against him are too strong, both the system that he him selv is a part of, and the darker sides in himself drive him downward. In that way it is a much more realistic story then usually told.

 

I want to look closer into the works of Andreij Zvyagintsev. He is an interesting director with beautiful visual language and a sharp look at both society and the human psychology. 

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