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What Movies Are You Watching Lately - Page 853

post #12781 of 14971
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambulance Chaser View Post

Saw Spectre yesterday. It felt like a bunch of elaborate action set pieces loosely connected together. In that sense, it was the antithesis of Casino Royale.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NAMOR View Post

also watched spectre and it was underwhelming

I was very excited to see Spectre, now I can barely muster enthusiasm. I feel like if I somehow manage to just skip it, I'll be better off for it. But, really, just flat out miss a Bond film? I mean, there's been other 007 turds I've sat through...
post #12782 of 14971
You don't have to see it in theaters...

It will show up in a spike TV marathon at some point.
post #12783 of 14971
^ Regardless of my thoughts about the last few Bond movies, I couldn't imagine not seeing them at the cinema...

Quote:
Originally Posted by NAMOR View Post

i guess what irks me about them is, ill read your reviews and most of the time i agree with what you say. and then i look at this number and it wont reflect the review, imo. feels like a huge gap needs to be filled in to make any sense of the numerical value
I guess I can see that, as I usually just write a sentence or two and may well leave out the more detailed reasons for whatever grade I've decided on, even though it often takes quite some contemplation to arrive at it. Oh, well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Harold falcon View Post

Condorman is an early '80s Disney movie that's part James Bond and part Pink Panther. It's not good by an objective standard, but I remember enjoying it as a wee lad. I suppose it's held up as best it can. The "special effects" are terrible, but the characters are decent. And Michael Crawford is pretty charismatic as the lead. The score by Henry Mancini is also not terrible.

5 dead bodies. Cane-machine-gun fu, Fake Porsche fu, gratuitous Gypsies. 2 stars.

I totally remember seeing posters for this back in '81 and wanting to see it as it felt slightly Bond like. Don't even think I ever saw a trailer for it, and I definitely never got to see the movie and now it's probably too late.
Extra, even more better poster: (Click to show)


Just compare this to the dull poster work on the last batch of Bond films...
post #12784 of 14971
The first Bond I saw in the theater was For Your Eyes Only. I don't think I missed one since except for Goldeneye, which came out during my first year in law school. If you're a Bond fan, just do it.
post #12785 of 14971
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambulance Chaser View Post

The first Bond I saw in the theater was For Your Eyes Only. I don't think I missed one since except for Goldeneye, which came out during my first year in law school. If you're a Bond fan, just do it.

Agree with your sentiments first I ever saw was Thunderball at the State in Sydney. They need to be seen on the big screen.
post #12786 of 14971
Craig is signed on for one more bond film fyi...and yes I know he came out saying he was not doing another one...i'll see if money talks. Mendes needs to go, not craig.
post #12787 of 14971
Quote:
Originally Posted by razl View Post

As someone who loved the book, I thought the movie's visual style - cinematography, costumes, sets, etc. - were excellent. I also recall the actors doing the material good justice. David Lynch's directorial warped take on everything was perfect (especially the Baron).

But Dune is heavily cerebral material and tough to visualize - hence all the scenes where you hear the character's thoughts - and is a big reason why the ending, versus the book, just got butchered into a star-wars esque, tatooine worm shoot 'em up fest. I've read that Lynch got forced into that by the studios and test audiences clamoring for a different ending than what he originally wanted to do, too bad.

Over the years there have been a number of rumors of a proper re-do, but it still hasn't happened. They've definitely got the tech now to do the visuals justice, we'll see....


I've always been a fan of the Lynch film. You really have to treat it as a separate entity from the book. I rewatched it recently and it still holds up.

There's a great little documentary (rockumentary) out there from a few years ago about the original attempt to adapt Dune in the mid '70s by Alejandro Jodorowsky.



Great story about a film that never got made, but what might have been.
post #12788 of 14971
I've seen that documentary...and I like lynch but dune never hit home with me.

I've had the book on my phone for a while. I need to finish grad school so I have time to read it
post #12789 of 14971
Quote:
Originally Posted by NAMOR View Post

lol that looks fantastic. The movie poster was makes me want to watch it

On the brink of extinction:
Condorman!!!

I was thinking the same thing. smile.gif
post #12790 of 14971
Quote:
Originally Posted by OmniscientCause View Post

I've seen that documentary...and I like lynch but dune never hit home with me.

I've had the book on my phone for a while. I need to finish grad school so I have time to read it

Interesting, I'd never really thought about someone seeing the movie who hadn't read the book. I can understand that it could be a lot less favorable from that perspective. But then I suppose most movies birthed from books have heard the same lament.

Don't let the movie keep you for the book, if you like scifi it's a must.
post #12791 of 14971

Def a SW&D kinda guy

post #12792 of 14971

1001 gram - Bent Hamer (2014)

 

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After the terrible Paris massacre this Friday it feels right to watch this movie about a Norwegian scientist going til Paris to measure the weight of a kilo when her own life is falling apart - without her being able to understand it. Her work is to define things in the physical world, her internal world is turmoil, but without her managing to understand it. She knows the measure of everything, but not the value of the important matters. The hardest burden is to not having a burden, she quotes in some scenes. The trouble is not no burden, but not being able to articulate her sadness. 

 

Beautiful photographed by John Christian Rosenlund in the most exquisite shades of blue, grey and green. Really a lot of beautiful takes in here; small movements, lot of steady camera.

The problem with the movie is the plot; the most unbelievable characters saying things people never say to each other; quasi-philosophically bullshit and lifeless utterances. And the happy ending is like mocking the audience; pure fake and just impossible to believe in.

 

I have seen other movies from Hamer that have had a lot more impressive content; he is always an observer from a distance, but here i don't know if he wants to be funny, psychological, tragic or was just not able to get the script right. I guess the last is the case here.

 
post #12793 of 14971

A few interesting (3.5/5) flicks I've seen recently:

 

 

A retired criminal investigator revisits an old rape-murder case. He sees his former supervisor (and crush) to rekindle lost memories. Reminded me a bit of Memories of Murder, a Korean film detailing a serial killer (also a decent flick if you haven't seen it).

 

 

A worker rebels against the mindless rules of his environment, so his fellow colleagues retaliate. It's individuality vs. status quo, but will the individual survive?

 

 

The best of the Three Colors Trilogy - probably because it's the most thought provoking. A kind hearted model meets a cynical retired judge, and in seemingly opposing ideologies a relationship blossoms.

 

 

Two boys - one from the upper-middle class and one from the slums - meet just prior to the coup d'etat of Chile in 1973. Friendship, class relations, and childhood struggles feature in this film. Reviewers say this is a very accurate portrayal of life at the time.

post #12794 of 14971

A pigeon sat on a branch reflecting on existence - Roy Anderson (2014)

 

 



The third and final film in Anderson's Beckettian description of what it is to be a human; lack of communication, lack of authenticity and ultimate estrangedness. This is witty, but mostly sad stories of our lives. The important questions in Anderson's movies is: 1) How do we react when we meet death and suppression, the most inevitable aspects of life?

2) How bad isn't it to be out of tune with our basic needs?

 

The palette, the make-up and the camera is the same as the two other movies ('You, the living' and ' Songs from the second floor'). Pale interiors, stationary camera and stylized acting creates this ambivalence feeling; so strange and at the same time so familiar. 

 

The movie does not give us any solution, though it has a lot of hope; there are scenes with real contact and real communication; it is when people are able to leave or forget their given roles in society. And then there is hope in humor; it can be a relief from tension.

But most of all the hope is in art, that it is possible to formulate the pain of being human, Thus the movie is not a critique of unhealthy structures or suppression, but a critique of humans not being able to defend themselves any better. This gives me a rather bitter taste in the mouth after watching this movie; is Roy Anderson mocking people for not doing better up against very strong forces? I think he could have done better if he's show more empathy and understanding with people's struggle with their lives.

 

But a beautiful movie it is. And a piece of art that is fully cinematic.

post #12795 of 14971
Saw Spectre. Really wēksos. Whoever thought up those action sequences should be necklaced.
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