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Is it acceptable to wear a button-down oxford with a tie?

post #1 of 75
Thread Starter 
I know its casual, but is wearing a tie with a button-down cloth shirt taboo?

I'm not wearing a suit. Just khakis and a navy blue blazer. I have been doing it forever and just recently a friend called me out on it. Jerk.

Please let me know what you think! Thank you.

-- Preppy Gent
post #2 of 75
Go right ahead. Very traditional American style. Brits will gnash their teeth at it, but who needs their poppycock anyway?
post #3 of 75
I think it's fine with an odd jacket but not with a suit unless you're a real preppy under 25. Otherwise, dress like a man and choose another collar for your suit days.
post #4 of 75
This look has no steez. I could recommend what you described if, perhaps, you added a Rolex. I think, IMO, a button down thingy can be worn with a tie if you have:

I. Diamond earrings
II. A sick ring
III. A bracelet made of hemp
IIII. Gold-plated shoes

This way you are still wearing a tie, and do not look poor. Best of luck.
post #5 of 75
You can wear a tie with a button down shirt - why not? It is a classic look.
post #6 of 75
Why else would shirts with button down collars button all the way to the top? I think it looks good, but wouldn't use a larger knot.
post #7 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post
Go right ahead. Very traditional American style. Brits will gnash their teeth at it, but who needs their poppycock anyway?

Here's some poppycock from a British person:

Actually British men don't dislike shirts with button down collars, and you do see men wearing them with ties in the UK, but in Britain it is not the recognised classic style as it is in the US. It seems to be something that goes in and out of favour more like a fashion than a classic style. In the 1980s, I recall button down collars and ties being fairly common in Britain, and I wore them myself occassionally. I've seen vintage photos of British men wearing button down collars with ties from the 40s and 50s. It's not much in favour now, and though you can buy button down shirts in Britain, few of them would accommodate a tie - they are intended to be worn only casually.

My opinion now is that buttons on collars are rendered redundant by a tie. If you aren't going to wear a tie, buttons are a good way to hold the collar down in place to avoid the 'hovering collar' look whereby the collar can float a couple of cms above the shoulders or chest. When I'm not wearing a tie, I tend to wear button down collars. If I plan to wear a tie, I will not pick a button down colllared shirt. Wearing both a button down shirt and a tie is - in my view - a bit like wearing both belt and braces.

I think the current fashion in London for very cutaway collars is due to them looking neater when worn without a tie, it's an alternative solution to buttons on the collar for the 'hovering collar' look in a tie-less 'business casual' environment. I suspect most very cutaway collared shirts are never worn with ties.

I really don't hear much tooth gnashing going on when some guy shows up wearing a button down with a tie; most British men wouldn't even notice. But if he shows up wearing a suit with brown shoes, well that's a different matter entirely ...

MaxH
post #8 of 75
Hmm. I think a cutaway collar WITHOUT a tie looks odder than a button-down WITH one.
post #9 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post
Go right ahead. Very traditional American style. Brits will gnash their teeth at it, but who needs their poppycock anyway?

I dont understand how the question facilitates you to launch an attack on English people
post #10 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kei-bon View Post
Hmm. I think a cutaway collar WITHOUT a tie looks odder than a button-down WITH one.

I wasn't advocating tieless use of cutaway collars, I think cutway collars look odd under all circumstances. Worn with a tie, they make the wearer look like a 19th century footman or butler. This was kind of a sociological comment; I think the rise of very wide spread collars and/or cutaways (I don't think there's any difference) is largely due to the 'suit and no tie' interpretation of business casual in London.
post #11 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaxH View Post
I wasn't advocating tieless use of cutaway collars, I think cutway collars look odd under all circumstances. Worn with a tie, they make the wearer look like a 19th century footman or butler. This was kind of a sociological comment; I think the rise of very wide spread collars and/or cutaways (I don't think there's any difference) is largely due to the 'suit and no tie' interpretation of business casual in London.

Lighten up Francis, he was just poking fun, no big deal.
post #12 of 75
It's fine by me, and I do it all the time. It has been debated ad nauseam on this forum, and you will find that opinions are hardened.
post #13 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaxH View Post
I wasn't advocating tieless use of cutaway collars, I think cutway collars look odd under all circumstances. Worn with a tie, they make the wearer look like a 19th century footman or butler. This was kind of a sociological comment; I think the rise of very wide spread collars and/or cutaways (I don't think there's any difference) is largely due to the 'suit and no tie' interpretation of business casual in London.
Some wide spreads look great worn open. When they're closed I think they beg for a bow tie.
post #14 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by PreppyGent View Post
I know its casual, but is wearing a tie with a button-down cloth shirt taboo? I'm not wearing a suit. Just khakis and a navy blue blazer. I have been doing it forever and just recently a friend called me out on it. Jerk. Please let me know what you think! Thank you. -- Preppy Gent
You're a preppy aren't you? I'd have thought it was de rigeur. Seriously, it is done in England, but for most who take more than a cursory interest in the way they dress it isn't that common, spread collars in various degrees being the 'preferred' choice. Ivy fans notwithstanding. Spread collars with a tie just look much smarter in my opinion, more English, button downs with a tie seems a more American look to my eye, not that there is anything wrong with that. Just try it and see how it looks. Avoid at all costs however, the affection of leaving the collars buttons undone which just looks sloppy and faux Italian.
post #15 of 75
I wouldn't do it. Would you wear a plaid flannel sport-shirt with a tie? If so, then go right ahead and wear your button-down with a tie. But I'd save button-downs for use as sport shirts. As a matter of fact, that's how button-downs started out, as a way to keep the collar from flipping up while playing sports.

Tony
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