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Chinese Cayenne - Page 2

post #16 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aaron View Post
Sorry, not being facetious. Geely, Chery and BYD are pretty popular in mainland China. And Buick is considered a top tier brand.

Thanks for the response, do they even have any sort of safety regulation standards there?

-LR
post #17 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aaron View Post
And Buick is considered a top tier brand.
Buick IS a top tier brand. Also not Chinese. Sheesh, what do they teach you guys in school these days?
post #18 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by HORNS View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rye GB View Post


Leave it to the Chinese to create a car out of papier-mache.
post #19 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by arirang View Post
Leave it to the Chinese to create a car out of papier-mache.

I was thinking more of tinfoil.

If I were living in China, I would be driving a Buick. Any Buick would probably sever one of these in half and proceed with maybe a couple of scratches.

Good lord, what a POS.

Mike
post #20 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by zjpj83 View Post
How do these guys not get in trouble for IP infringement?

The Chinese government protects their own. Its known that if you try to get anybody in court over there, you're pissing money away.

And yes, the knockoff cars are extremely popular. The X5 lookalike (maybe called CEO?) is a common site.
post #21 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by zjpj83 View Post
How do these guys not get in trouble for IP infringement?
I remember watching a TED talk about industries that have no or little IP protection. The car industry is one of them when it comes to design. The clothing industry is also like that. With these types of industries, they try to protect the trademark or copyright so that copycats can't market it under their name. There was also a great article in NY Times that talked about the economics of copying entire cars and they postulated that because of the low margin of profit from these copycat cars, and how fast these cars were coming out after the originals that they could safely conclude that the govt was funding the programs.
post #22 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rye GB View Post

I was hoping that at the end... after a long pause... when it's quiet... the crash test dummy head falls off and hits the floor.
post #23 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisjustinparr View Post
I was hoping that at the end... after a long pause... when it's quiet... the crash test dummy head falls off and hits the floor.

Or that it's a Chinese political prisoner with markings taped all over them.
post #24 of 41
60 years ago when Japan started importing cars into the United States, they were considered pieces of sh*t.

20 years ago when Korea started importing cars into the United States, they were considered pieces of sh*t.

Look at them now.

Give the Chinese a few years, they'll catch up. The same goes for the Indians.
post #25 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by brown eyes View Post
60 years ago when Japan started importing cars into the United States, they were considered pieces of sh*t.

20 years ago when Korea started importing cars into the United States, they were considered pieces of sh*t.

Look at them now.

Give the Chinese a few years, they'll catch up. The same goes for the Indians.

Finally a guy who makes some sense in this thread. I feel that a majority of hostility against the Chinese is fear of the potential and capabilities of the Chinese.
post #26 of 41
^ Maybe in 20 years I'll be driving a quality Chinese car and liking it, but I feel sorry for anyone unwittingly driving a Chinese-made death trap on wheels today.
post #27 of 41
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monaco View Post
I feel that a majority of hostility against the Chinese is fear of the potential and capabilities of the Chinese.

Were they handing out special pins @ the Glory to China rally you just came back from ?
Car makers in Japan who've been @ it for over 50 years, to this day haven't quite figured out the art of suspension tuning.
post #28 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Christofuh View Post
Were they handing out special pins @ the Glory to China rally you just came back from ?
Car makers in Japan who've been @ it for over 50 years, to this day haven't quite figured out the art of suspension tuning.



Mazda MX-5?
Nissan GT-R?
And a whole heap of other cars that handle damn well - much better than most of the products churned out by the US car companies.
post #29 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by bkk View Post
The Chinese government protects their own. Its known that if you try to get anybody in court over there, you're pissing money away.
There is, however, a very vibrant market amongst security/risk management firms in IP security. One way or another, if you really want IP violations stopped. You can get them stopped.
post #30 of 41
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post


Mazda MX-5?
Nissan GT-R?
And a whole heap of other cars that handle damn well - much better than most of the products churned out by the US car companies.


The handling aspect they've more or less gotten a grip on. What they struggle @ is combining firm, sporty handling with comfy ride. More so when the patch of rubber separating wheel from pavement gets thinner and thinner.
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