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Ski Clothing - Page 2

post #16 of 53
Definitely depends on where you are going. For extreme cold climates consider mittens instead of gloves, and definitely take a spare pair of socks. Remember that what will make you seriously, uncomfortably cold is wearing non-breathable clothing that doesn't allow sweat to escape. If you are sweaty, you will get very cold, very fast, especially on the lifts going up. Hence the many positive responses here to merino baselayers, which wick sweat away and keep you warm. The spare socks are to change into at lunchtime if your morning pair are damp - a single pair of dry socks is significantly warmer than two pairs of damp socks. Clothing that allows you to regulate temperature can be very useful - i.e. zips that will help you to cool down when you start to overheat, and warm up when you start to cool down.
post #17 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by eml4sker View Post
I've skied plenty. I'm just at a point now where I want to get clothing/gear that is comfortable, functional and I can own for 15-20 years.

I'd say I'm looking for normal weather ski gear -- 20 - 35 degrees F.

I can't imagine you've skied plenty if you think that you can own any piece of ski gear for 15-20 years. There are two types of skiers - The ones who go to the top of the mountain (functionality), and the ones who stay at the bottom (form). Neither of which are capable of pulling off 15 year old 'ski clothing'.
post #18 of 53
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by spider52 View Post
I can't imagine you've skied plenty if you think that you can own any piece of ski gear for 15-20 years. There are two types of skiers - The ones who go to the top of the mountain (functionality), and the ones who stay at the bottom (form). Neither of which are capable of pulling off 15 year old 'ski clothing'.

Spider -- if you want to provide some help or guidance, that would be great. If you just want to nickel and dime me on a time estimate, please find another thread. I'm not going to have an argument with someone who has never met me about how much I've skied.
post #19 of 53
Well for durability leather gloves (with frequent waterproofing), merino wool underwear and midlayers should be allright. A hardshell that is durable and waterproof and breathable is gonna cost you though. I would stay away from flashy colours and stick with red,white, black etc. if you don't want to look outdated quickly in terms of what is fashionable on the slopes. The recent trend towards acid green, bright yellow and bright blue etc. will look outdated in just a couple of seasons I think.
post #20 of 53
I ski with an Arc'Teryx jacket and Adidas Porsche Design pants. Both very durable and well cut. You could also check out Nau, Cloudveil,Patagonia, etc. Red and POC make stylish helmets.
post #21 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flieger View Post
Well for durability leather gloves (with frequent waterproofing), merino wool underwear and midlayers should be allright. A hardshell that is durable and waterproof and breathable is gonna cost you though. I would stay away from flashy colours and stick with red,white, black etc. if you don't want to look outdated quickly in terms of what is fashionable on the slopes. The recent trend towards acid green, bright yellow and bright blue etc. will look outdated in just a couple of seasons I think.

+1

Pretty much all my crap is black or grey. It doesn't go out of style, it's visible against snow, it absorbs sunlight to add a bit of warmth.

Also, +1 on all the recs for merino wool baselayers. In addition to Icebreaker and Patagucci, you may want to check out Ibex. I have a pair of Ibex pants in stretch merino that I love - they have a fleece pad under the butt that's a real help on cold chairlifts.

Also, +1 on the suggestion to stay the hell out of the BC unless you've had some training in avalanche awareness and avoidance. Those RECCO things are mainly for in-resort use, if you're caught in an avy in the BC RECCO will just be used to find your frozen corpse - you'll have 30 minutes at best to be recovered, so you're relying on your companions for rescue, not SAR. Unless you're on a heli trip - lot of those outfits are using RECCO now.
post #22 of 53
Lots of expensive advice here. I'm surprised no one's suggested going bespoke yet.

Patagonia's merino undies are nice, sure, but I've been wearing REI polypro base layers for decades, and they are just as functional at a fraction of the cost. Unless the OP is going to be out for days at a time, he does not need to fork out for expedition-grade gear.
post #23 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by eml4sker View Post
Spider -- if you want to provide some help or guidance, that would be great. If you just want to nickel and dime me on a time estimate, please find another thread. I'm not going to have an argument with someone who has never met me about how much I've skied.
Certainly wasn't my intention, but when you make the claim you've skied plenty and then make a an incredible statement, it is bound to draw some snark. We are all novice (didn't say first-timer) at something and you will absorb a lot more if you approach it with a sense of humility. That being said - lets talk functionality. Your budget will determine form (a lot of name brands being thrown out that are good, but not necessarily worth the money) Pants need pockets, crotch vents, and knee cuff/reinforcements. If you bring a lot on the mountain, it is better to keep the weight on your lower body to protect it and balance your center of gravity. My favorite pants have pockets on the cuff - best place for a heavy multi-tool. Jacket must be waterproof, have pit zips and be loose enough to be comfortable over a few layers. Base Layer Jackets/Pants keep you wind free and dry. Base layer should keep you warm. Chili, HH, Spyder are great thermals with different thickness. The most important thing for me, however, is a quilted down vest. It keeps the iPhone from freezing and is wearable at the base. Gloves The 'best' are not always warmest. I prefer it to go over the cuff with a draw string. A zipper/pocket on the back for hand warmer is very handy. Holding a handwarmer makes your hand sweat and will just make you colder. Goggles One of the few things in life that I can honestly say I have more than one of. Polarized high intensity for flat light, Dark for bright light
post #24 of 53
I live in the Pacific NW and ride a lot - if there is a powder day, I'm usually on it. Not sure when you last bought any gear, but the stuff today is amazing - I am often stunned by A) how nasty it is out B) how dry and warm I am and C) how little I am actually wearing.

FWIW, I did a bunch of work in the action sports industry at one point and have a basement, garage, and surf/ski shack filled with top-end stuff so feel I have some basis for comparison. I'm not overly brand loyal as most technical clothing is really all the same or close to it a season after any breakthrough is made, but favor what works so here's a few thoughts:

- +1 for the merino base layer. Don't sweat the logo.. it all works; midweight is the most versatile and the best part about wool is that it doesn't stink the ay polypropo does

- Fleece jackets in both mid and heavyweight versions to adjust with temps. Don't go with a windstopper if this is going to be a midlayer - you'll sweat then freeze on the venting.

- A vest is key. I have an Arcteryx soft shell vest that I have worn more than anything I've ever bought and a Nau down vest. Can be used with an expedition weight fleece base top to provide perfect insulation on those tweener days where the fleece jackets are either too much or or under one when they are not enough. Really adds some depth to the insulation lineup

- I have a pretty serious hardshell setup (arcteryx sidewinder and Burton AK pants), but I haven't used it in about 5 years. Even in 50mph-snowing sideways-zero visibility harshness, I've switched to softshells but have learned that all are not created equal. Some breathe quite a bit (good for spring); some are as dense as hardshells (good for storms or windy days) and some are in between ( good for everything else - I have one of each), so you have to pay attention to the fabric details.

If you are looking for a solid jacket that splits the differences, you should probably look at a mountain hardwear syncro - lots of versions and you can find them on sale. Size up one if you are layering.

Good softshell pants for the steeps are harder to find. I stumbled across a pair of Salomons cut like oversize jeans in a warehouse sale a few years back and bought them for spring days - I wear them for everything now. Don't think they make them any more - naturally.

Key is to wash all your SS stuff and then treat it at the beginning of each season so the repellence is up to snuff. Outdoor stores sell the stuff to do this with...

Straight hardshells have their place, but there are alternatives to good old GoreTex - for example, Lowe's stuff is actually better for wet climates - at lots of price points.

- Gloves...or Mittens. This is personal, but I've found that the primaloft stuff is warmer than fleece and usually go with a full goretex insert. Can't seem to get more than 2-3 seasons out of anything before the thumb joint starts leaking

Socks - more wool. Usual suspects - SmartWool, etc.

- I wear a helmet always. Just retired my Giro G9 for a new Smith Variant. They are much warmer than you think and venting gives flexibility - Plus improves the sense of invincibility in the trees! Go to a store and try them on as different makes are better for different skull shapes.

Goggles - I use Smith, but there are plenty of good ones that vent well. Best all-in-one lens is amber; next is rose tint. Be careful of going too dark as these only really work on sunny days and are a huge disadvantage in storms

Everything can be bought on deep discount - the interwebz is a wonderful place to shop for last year's closeouts- but be sure to look at user reviews to see how specific models work and/or hold up. Spadout.com is a good place to start..

Hope this helps and that La Nina brings you much joy this season!
post #25 of 53
I can't say enough about Helly Hansen. I've tried numerous outfitters throughout the years and HH is easily my favorite.

I typically use a Propile Fleece or Odin Isolator as a mid-layer and the Granite as a shell, both in and out-of-bounds. Their gear is form-fitting and the arm length is perfect which is important since I have longer arms. Their jackets fit like Kjus but at half the price.

For pants I have about five pairs of TNF Freedom's which have never let me down. At the end of the season they are usually a bill or less.

Best socks ever are Darn Tough.
post #26 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowyAcres View Post
I can't say enough about Helly Hansen. I've tried numerous outfitters throughout the years and HH is easily my favorite.

HH is (IMO), some of the best outerwear out there for skiing, functionality and quality wise. They have some pretty decent looking stuff as well.

Personally, I'm a huge fan of Armada. If you want to look good, consider Armada (http://armadaskis.com), Orage (http://www.orage.com/products), Burton (http://ca.burton.com/on/demandware.s...-Site/default), Helly Hansen, etc.

Look for gear with high waterproofing ratings (10,000mm or above) and high breathability (10,000gsm or above). anything with 5,000mm or below will suck up water like a sponge once the water repellent coating wears off after the first few washes. most manufacturers publish this right in the product info online and on the tags in store.

A quality jacket and pants will have taped seams, under arm/leg vents, a storm skirt (attaches the jacket to your pant belt to form a barrier which prevents wind/snow coming up underneath your jacket. If you want to spend a bit extra get something with waterproof zippers as well.

Oakley is a solid choice for tried and tested goggles that wont fog on you.

Sorry if my post is patronizing, I am not 100% on your level of familiarity with ski outerwear. If not, hope it helps!
post #27 of 53
Good info guys. Check for gloves with à removable liner and take 2 pair of linergloves with you.
post #28 of 53
I'm a huge fan of SmartWool socks (have a few pairs of the Medium cushion classic socks). They're super durable, warm, and offer a good amount of cushioning. Like other posters have said, good baselayers are a must. I've been using a couple sets of Patagonia Capilene 2/3s (half-zip top and bottoms) depending on the temperature and have been thinking of stepping up to the merinos this season.
post #29 of 53
Sportswear of Sweden - SOS - has always been good for me. And buy more than one pair of gloves.
post #30 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefe View Post
Please don't do this without a significant commitment to education and safety protocol.

Yes, you're right. If you don't know what recco is already, you better stay away from places where there are risks of avalanches.
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