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Help me buy a gun. - Page 2

post #16 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arethusa
Learn the law. Consider the consequences of shooting very seriously. Learn about guns and how to handle them safely. Then think about learning to shoot and picking out a pretty gun. The other stuff is far, far more important.
Seconded. A gun is something you have to learn to own and use. My mama said the pistol was the devil's right hand.
post #17 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by m@T
ahh at least its quick....the Vietnamese kill dogs for eating in a seriously cruel way.

Basically they break its legs, leave it laying on the floor for a couple hours while the adrenaline settles (bitter taste apparently).

Then they put it in a sack and beat it with planks til it stops whimpering (tenderises the meat apparently).

i'm ashamed to say that made me laugh out loud, and i honestly hate unwarranted animal cruelty. why the hell do they break the legs in the first place? and cant the tenderising be done post-death? have you ever tried any? i reckon i would, i bet it just tastes like cat though

on topic - i'm amazed people can be so blase about the purchase of a gun.
post #18 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by orbitingio
I don't know much at all about guns, but I'd like to buy one for personal protection.

I'd like something very small. I prefer silver metals, dislike wood, and like sleekness and right angles. I'd prefer a (relatively) inexpensive model. So long as it's capable of performing the necessary task, I don't need any absurdly fancy stuff. I'd still like a bit of sexiness, though, and preferably the sort of thing that could fit in a jacket pocket if need be.

I know there are many who are knowledgeable about guns here, so any guidance you might have would be appreciated.

The lifestyle forum takes an inevitable turn ...
post #19 of 84
A lot of wise people on this forum. I second all the previous recommendations except the dog-eating in Cambodia.

When I was in Ohio a while back, I was in a similar situation, wanting to buy a gun for self/family protection. I went to a gun shop/range, and was told that I could not buy a gun unless I'm familiar with the workings and safety of guns. In retrospect, I think it was just a store policy, but was probably the best advice I've ever received when it comes to firearms.

I took a NRA-approved safety course, tried out different types of guns first, then settled on the ones I currently own. My wife, who was afraid of guns, took the class with me. She also agrees that it was very very valuable.
post #20 of 84
I'd recommend a Beretta. Small. Easy to use, but not TOO easy (like a glock). Not to hijack, but I'm curious-----let's say a friend inherited a pistol (with all the papers) from Anton Chekhov (for example) and did not want it; is there a proper way of disposing of it? Can you sell someone else's gun to a reputable dealer if you have the appropriate documentation? Anyone ever sell a gun to the cops? Or should my friend just throw it in a river? Or trade it for an ounce of herb? I don't want to stick around for the third act...
post #21 of 84
Just buy whatever. Or move to Indiana.
post #22 of 84
I don't necessarily agree with the one-week courses mainly aimed at women who want to do concealed-carry, but in order to get up to speed, it doesn't take too much longer than that - as long as you are willing to keep up with regular practice, and you are willing to take some time at home to learn how the gun operates. (i.e. take it apart, clean it, put it back together, etc.)

You're probably going to want to learn on a normal-sized gun at first, prior to getting something that's concealable. It's just easier to learn that way. When you're ready to get something concealable (preferably NOT to be kept in a pocket) you can't do much better than this: http://www.kel-tec.com/p32.html . It's one of the most common concealed carry guns. Just make sure you're following state law wherever you are, as every state is different.
post #23 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnapril
Just buy whatever. Or move to Indiana.

Only if you're an acrobat named Trixie.
post #24 of 84
As Tokyo Slim suggested, take a class. I suggest going to the NRA website and finding a local instructor. He will not only help you learn the proper handling, storage and maintenance of your gun, he should also be able to guide you in making a proper choice in which gun to purchase.
post #25 of 84
The gun that you should buy is a compact pistol made by Kahr Arms:

They are very well made, very small, easily concealable (even in a jacket pocket), quite accurate, and are available in both 9mm or .40 caliber, either of which is good for self defense (.40 being better than 9mm in that respect.)

Look at the PM series and the MK series in 9mm and .40 S&W.

http://www.kahr.com/pistols_40sw.html#40sw
post #26 of 84
I'll just pile on here and agree with what everyone else said. Learn the laws of your state. The concealed firearms carry laws vary greatly from state to state. For example, in Connecticut, you have to complete a firearms safety course before applying for your permit (I think it's even harder to get the permit now, but I've had mine for several years so I'm not up to speed).

Even if you're not required to take such a course, you should. You should also familiarize yourself with various handguns first by practicing at a range. See what style/caliber you feel comfortable with. Generally, for a newbie, I'd recommend looking at revolvers before semi-automatics. They're much more idiot proof. Easy to load, easy to shoot, never jam, etc. In my experience (although it's been awhile since I looked), a good revolver is also usually less expensive than a good semi-automatic.

Finally, consider other methods of self-defense first. Pepper spray immediately springs to mind. I'd vote against an expandable baton or knife unless you have some training on how to use it, but others might disagree.
post #27 of 84
I'd ask a similar question except that I'm looking to buy a handgun because I enjoy shooting. I have no expectation that it will be used in the near future for anything other than shooting at a range. I'm currently vacillating between a 1) small-caliber auto because the gun/ammo cost less and it's easier to shoot and 2) some variation of the .45 1911 becaus of its elegant and classic design and its potential to be used for things other than target shooting.
post #28 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by dah328
I'd ask a similar question except that I'm looking to buy a handgun because I enjoy shooting. I have no expectation that it will be used in the near future for anything other than shooting at a range. I'm currently vacillating between a 1) small-caliber auto because the gun/ammo cost less and it's easier to shoot and 2) some variation of the .45 1911 becaus of its elegant and classic design and its potential to be used for things other than target shooting.

A nice Ruger .22 will cost $300-350 or so, is cheap to shoot, and very accurate. A higher end 1911 will run $2,000 or so, is very accurate, and you are throwing quarters at the target each time you squeeze the crisp 4# tuned trigger. I have a Ruger and a Wilson 1911 and enjoy them both!
post #29 of 84
Orb, I agree with the rest of the folks who said to learn the law and learn to shoot before you rely on a firearm for personal protection. A gun does not prevent the problem, it gives you an additional tool to use to solve the problem. If you don't know how (and when) to use the tool, at best, you have purchased an expensive paperweight, and worst, you will get yourself or someone else killed because of your lack of knowledge and skill.
post #30 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by denimdestroyedmylife
Not to hijack, but I'm curious-----let's say a friend inherited a pistol (with all the papers) from Anton Chekhov (for example) and did not want it; is there a proper way of disposing of it? Can you sell someone else's gun to a reputable dealer if you have the appropriate documentation? Anyone ever sell a gun to the cops? Or should my friend just throw it in a river? Or trade it for an ounce of herb? I don't want to stick around for the third act...
Why would ever try to sell anything to the police unless you're a contractor? Seriously, the police have a function in society. They collect evidence and make arrests to aid in criminal prosecution. They're not there to make you feel better if guns make you nervous. If you inherit a gun, it's your property, same as inheriting a car. If you don't want it, take it to a gun shop or a pawn shop and sell it. Though, really, if it's Chekhov's and it's documented, you should be taking it to Sotheby's, not Big Al's Game and Gunnin'.
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