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I think I hate San Francisco. - Page 127

post #1891 of 2659
Quote:
Originally Posted by pocketsquareguy View Post

I've known three people who commuted from Marin by Ferry to SF. They all loved it. It must be one of the all-time great commute options if near your home and work.

I know at least half a dozen people who have moved from SF to Marin in the last year, and all of them are now commuting on one ferry or another. I'd be jealous, if it weren't for the fact that they have that commute because they live in Marin.
post #1892 of 2659
Quote:
Originally Posted by imatlas View Post

I know at least half a dozen people who have moved from SF to Marin in the last year, and all of them are now commuting on one ferry or another. I'd be jealous, if it weren't for the fact that they have that commute because they live in Marin.
I lived in Marin for five years and the commute was actually one of the best parts of the day. A five minute drive to the ferry, a half hour ferry ride, pick up breakfast in the ferry terminal, five minute walk to the office. Very civilized and a great way to wake up/decompress. I loved it.
post #1893 of 2659
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolpapa View Post

I lived in Marin for five years and the commute was actually one of the best parts of the day. A five minute drive to the ferry, a half hour ferry ride, pick up breakfast in the ferry terminal, five minute walk to the office. Very civilized and a great way to wake up/decompress. I loved it.

Perhaps the best commute anywhere in the US....if you must commute.
post #1894 of 2659
I never understood why they shut down the Berkeley Marina ferry. But it could b due to its outrageously inflated self-importance, which beats San Francisco's by a long shot.
post #1895 of 2659

I went straight to the comment section ffffuuuu.giflol8[1].gif
post #1896 of 2659

Ugh. 

 

SF doesn't really have a real estate market. It's more of an antimarket. While there is a land limit issue, we're nowhere near as dense as other cities with comparable demographic attractants - there are bedroom communities of New York, LA, and Miami among others that are more dense.

 

SF has highly restrictive 40 foot height limits most places and the level of resistance to teardowns is high. The level of opposition one normally sees in NY to teardowns like the Hotel Penn are routinely seen in SF against razing ugly little tilt-ups, which is why ugly little tilt-ups (and their antecedents, the clapboard "Victorians" which were originally designed as low-cost, quasi-expendable row houses) dominate many neighborhoods. 

 

The big issue is the overwhelming power of the NIMBY factions - which include interests of multiple ideological stripe. The public voice of the movement are older Prop 13 homeowners who make up most of the neighborhood associations, along with tenant groups who push the gentrification line. Behind those groups are large portfolio rental providers like Trinity Properties who want to maintain a local monopoly on entry level housing. The end result is a coalition with power comparable to that of the NRA in DC. They're basically a bunch of (pardon the pun) rent-seeking lampreys. 

 

There has been some successful pushback. New units are being built and rent hikes are attenuating. The primary press voice of the rent-seekers, the Bay Guardian, has imploded in the last few years due to conflict between its ownership and staff. In that time it briefly and baldly evolved into a political slate card factory, but eventually the owners finally sold the paper off to the shell corporation of a Canadian conglomerate, who are consolidating them. And most of these hikes are cyclical anyway. During the last Dot Com boom in the 90's you heard similar noises about the City becoming "overcrowded," despite our having less residents than we had in the post World War II period. And back then we had many more families living here. 

post #1897 of 2659
The NIMBYs are shameless. Much of Bernal is RH-1 with a 30-foot height limit, and you get knuckleheads trying to stop property owners from building even to that restrictive standard.
post #1898 of 2659
post #1899 of 2659
If I'm in SF for a night, staying at the Westin on Powell, where's the one place I should try to eat? I tend to like simple stuff, without pretension, just done well.
post #1900 of 2659
Quote:
Originally Posted by msg View Post

If I'm in SF for a night, staying at the Westin on Powell, where's the one place I should try to eat? I tend to like simple stuff, without pretension, just done well.

I've had some nice meals at Bourbon Steak in that hotel - particularly the flatiron steak. Probably fails on the pretension aspect, but the steak is simple and well prepared. That part of the city isn't really an epicenter for the type of place you are likely looking for though. If you're willing to venture out, I'd hit up Nopa or Delfina which are two of the more time-tested unpretentious restaurants in the city and reliably great. Boulevard is closer to union square, a bit more traditional and also great.
post #1901 of 2659
Sears, at least for breakfast.
post #1902 of 2659
Sears is awful. It's like the #1 awful restaurant in San Francisco.
post #1903 of 2659
Thread Starter 

I don't know ... there are a lot of really bad restaurants in SanFo.

 

lefty

post #1904 of 2659
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

Sears is awful. It's like the #1 awful restaurant in San Francisco.

Oh come on. Don't tell me you'd recommend Lefty's? The dining room on top of the Marines Memorial building used to serve great Prime Rib but I haven't been there in ages. The closest I normally go to eat near Union Square is Alfred's.
post #1905 of 2659
ha! I literally work right across from Alfreds.

Sushiritto.... really? really? worst
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