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Good source for 1950s style? - Page 2

post #16 of 30
For a really good representation of 50s trad, check out Quiz Show.
post #17 of 30
Not sure what Gainesville is near but there are some fashion schools / schools with costume design in Fl. They should have a library specifically for fashion / costumes.

Here is a link of some schools:

Link
post #18 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel
There is a seamstress on Fedora Lounge that is like the Manton of 40's-50's style.
To Whom do you refer?
post #19 of 30
If you end up playing a 50s style J.D., watch Crybaby

I have a book called "All Shook Up" which has some awesome 50s youth styles, from trad to rebel. If you want to go more "rebel" there's a book called "Teenage Confidential" that has some great images.

Another movie that might give you some ideas is Pleasantville, which has some really good representation of 1950s style. And of course LA Confidential is amazing.

I used to dress exclusively in vintage 1950s gear for many years so hit me up on myspace if you wanna talk about it.
post #20 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by caelte
From someone who was actually there?

No, born in '68, just a student of vintage clothes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by caelte
Do you know where or with who those flat front ,skinny ties etc originated?

As best I can tell, the dimunation of neckwear was a gradual process across the decade, although there may be a specific innovator who helped move things along.

Quote:
Originally Posted by caelte
Do you know of any print or web sources for that info? Movies are too stylized to be of any real use.Hipster photos,night club photos,things like that..

Best sources I've found for getting a sense of how people really dressed: old yearbooks from the era, ads from magazines and newspapers. Most of what you see in movies that recreate the era is a highly stylized version of 50s dress.
post #21 of 30
The '50s had a lot of flamboyant jewelry, and watches.

As well, various printed silks were fashionable, and neck scarves.
post #22 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jovan
Helps to look at the thread title.
Helps to actually be specific about what you are looking for.
post #23 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by j
Helps to actually be specific about what you are looking for.
ya, especially when you go back and edit the original post for clarity....
post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vintage Gent
No, born in '68, just a student of vintage clothes.



As best I can tell, the dimunation of neckwear was a gradual process across the decade, although there may be a specific innovator who helped move things along.



Best sources I've found for getting a sense of how people really dressed: old yearbooks from the era, ads from magazines and newspapers. Most of what you see in movies that recreate the era is a highly stylized version of 50s dress.
I think in large part, the skinnyization of men's clothing in the later 50s was a reaction to the wideness of the post-war years, which was supposedly a reaction to wartime rationing. People wanted to move away from all that extra fabric, extra pleats, cuffs, etc.

Also, space age fabrics were a big deal - lots of Rayon shirts and Orlon (acrylic) sweaters among other things.
post #25 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by j
I think in large part, the skinnyization of men's clothing in the later 50s was a reaction to the wideness of the post-war years, which was supposedly a reaction to wartime rationing.

Strange thing is you could buy a suit during the war, and it didn't look a whole lot different than what you could get right before or after. Vests and pleats were a no-no, but double-breasted was OK. Why? Obviously the War Prodcuction Board wanted to expend as little fabric as possible for civilian use. Best way to do that was to keep styles unchanged, to freeze fashion evolution. That way, at least those on the home front wouldn't feel the need to go out and buy a new suit to be in style. The suit you purchased three seasons ago would suffice.

The styles in the late 40s and early 50s were largely an extension of the styles that had endured through the war, with a little more exaggeration.
post #26 of 30
Maybe that's it then, they had had a very long period of the wider stuff. But didn't women's clothes get much trimmer during the war? And wasn't there a reaction afterwards of much more voluminous clothes for women?
post #27 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by j
But didn't women's clothes get much trimmer during the war? And wasn't there a reaction afterwards of much more voluminous clothes for women?

Dresses got shorter and had a lot less decorative fabric during the war. True post-war change in women's fashions comes in 1947 with Dior's New Look: wasp-waisted dresses with widely flared skirts.
post #28 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vintage Gent
Dresses got shorter and had a lot less decorative fabric during the war. True post-war change in women's fashions comes in 1947 with Dior's New Look: wasp-waisted dresses with widely flared skirts.
was a great look too
post #29 of 30
Taschen has published books that highlight advertising by decade. Your library might still have magazines from that time.
post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by designprofessor
Taschen has published books that highlight advertising by decade. Your library might still have magazines from that time.

That's a great series. I have the 1950s advertising book and it's an awesome reference tome.
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