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HR Depts Suck - Page 4

post #46 of 62
The HR lady at my office is friendly and talks about TV shows. Sorry to say it sucks for you, Jon.
post #47 of 62
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neo_Version 7 View Post
The HR lady at my office is friendly and talks about TV shows. Sorry to say it sucks for you, Jon.

The HR Manager for my old company was awesome. But again, they only had 1 HR Manager and 1 HR Assistant for 250 people. ADP did the payroll checks and another company handled the rest of the benefits. The interview / hiring decision was done by whomever the department manager was.

After reading this thread, it looks like it sucks for a lot of people.
post #48 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS View Post
They aren't there to help companies either.

That depends what standpoint you take. But I'll always remember getting advice with an HR person while we were out for lunch together. She said, "You're the best person to look out for yourself."

Suffice to say, I no longer moaned about the lack of mentorship programs, cross-training or internal opportunities.
post #49 of 62
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by fwiffo View Post
That depends what standpoint you take. But I'll always remember getting advice with an HR person while we were out for lunch together. She said, "You're the best person to look out for yourself." Suffice to say, I no longer moaned about the lack of mentorship programs, cross-training or internal opportunities.
Others aren't anywhere as important as the bolded section. Why would any qualified, ambitions person stay if there aren't internal opportunities? If they can't grow? I've been seeking opportunities in other companies already and the first one I get, I'm jumping ship. No one who wants to advance should stay somewhere where they have no future. In addition, if anyone has any leads of a job(s) in the fashion / apparel industry, please PM me.
post #50 of 62
This has been a most enjoyable thread.

Five stars.
post #51 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by fwiffo View Post
That depends what standpoint you take. But I'll always remember getting advice with an HR person while we were out for lunch together. She said, "You're the best person to look out for yourself."

Suffice to say, I no longer moaned about the lack of mentorship programs, cross-training or internal opportunities.

I would say lack of internal opportunities presents a HUGE cost to a business. If the folks with a lot of drive and hard work ethic can't see a path available, they'll go elsewhere to climb the ladder. Continually hiring and training new people is costly and time consuming, and decreases productivity. I would also say that morale will suffer because of high employee turnover, constant loss of the hard workers that are productive, etc.

Mentoring and cross training? Eh. . . make that happen on your own.
post #52 of 62
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Milpool View Post
I would say lack of internal opportunities presents a HUGE cost to a business. If the folks with a lot of drive and hard work ethic can't see a path available, they'll go elsewhere to climb the ladder. Continually hiring and training new people is costly and time consuming, and decreases productivity. I would also say that morale will suffer because of high employee turnover, constant loss of the hard workers that are productive, etc.

Mentoring and cross training? Eh. . . make that happen on your own.

This ^^^.
post #53 of 62
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
This has been a most enjoyable thread.

Five stars.

Well, I'm a five star poaster
post #54 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Milpool View Post
I would say lack of internal opportunities presents a HUGE cost to a business. If the folks with a lot of drive and hard work ethic can't see a path available, they'll go elsewhere to climb the ladder. Continually hiring and training new people is costly and time consuming, and decreases productivity. I would also say that morale will suffer because of high employee turnover, constant loss of the hard workers that are productive, etc.

Mentoring and cross training? Eh. . . make that happen on your own.

Yes and no. Sometimes if all the above holds true a clique of people progress up the ranks together. The organization can become hardened like a worn out artery even if it is continually successful at its raison d'etre. Sometimes you need someone new with fresh ideas to come in.

Of course I recognize that the lack of a way to move up is a barrier in most mid and small sized corporations.
post #55 of 62
It's been fully ingrained into my mind that the HR department isn't any more successful at hiring the right candidate than the manager/supervisor of the position with no "training" in human resources (I'd be appalled if there was a degree for this "field", which to me sounds like glorified paperwork).
There probably were a few books that I've read which unfairly reinforces this image admittingly.

In our department we bypass our HR dept entirely when it gets to the interview process - HR is just there to fill out employee related paperwork, deal with compensation matters and very low level screening of resumes. Yes, tons of false positives for sure, but we really can't handle processing the hundreds of applications so HR is a necessary evil. But by the time we narrow it down and get to the face to face, there's no reason for them to be involved - we would understand far better the candidate we are looking for and the technical skills they are required to possess better than an HR person would and their behavioral psychoanalytic claptrap.

Then again, this may be yet another case of me underhandedly dismissing something that I do not understand.
post #56 of 62
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by svelten View Post
It's been fully ingrained into my mind that the HR department isn't any more successful at hiring the right candidate than the manager/supervisor of the position with no "training" in human resources (I'd be appalled if there was a degree for this "field", which to me sounds like glorified paperwork).
There probably were a few books that I've read which unfairly reinforces this image admittingly.

In our department we bypass our HR dept entirely when it gets to the interview process - HR is just there to fill out employee related paperwork, deal with compensation matters and very low level screening of resumes. Yes, tons of false positives for sure, but we really can't handle processing the hundreds of applications so HR is a necessary evil. But by the time we narrow it down and get to the face to face, there's no reason for them to be involved - we would understand far better the candidate we are looking for and the technical skills they are required to possess better than an HR person would and their behavioral psychoanalytic claptrap.

Then again, this may be yet another case of me underhandedly dismissing something that I do not understand.

Well, there are HR degrees (BA and MA), and most people doing HR don't have one. Actually most people I see with HR degrees (at least at the company I currently work for), have Art History degrees, and Poly Sci degrees, etc... and they were doing something else completely differently and somehow got into HR and are now stuck with cozy jobs, BS'ing all day and utterly fucking up the organization.

I was once sitting in my companies HR recruiting office for about an hour, on a tuesday at around 2 pm and no one, I mean no one in that office was working. All of them were chatting about their personal lives, on the phone with friends or browsing the internet for personal reasons. Shouldn't they, I don't know, be reading resumes or filing other recruiting related paperwork?!?!?
post #57 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by riverrun View Post
Just took a look at the amazon page. This looks like a great resource for figuring out what companies to avoid going to work for.

You mean any company with an HR department? good luck with that.
post #58 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS View Post
I popped in randomly in his office last Thursday at the start of this, I don't know which is the best way to gt an appointment so I can talk to him to hopefully end this nonesense.

If he isnt making time to see you he is not seriously considering you for the position.

Its very rare that HR can block a candidate that the hiring manager actually wants to take forward (barring any serious contradiction with hiring policies). In fact, if the hiring manager already has someone in mind it makes HR's job easier as it takes one open requirement off their hands.

K
post #59 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS View Post
Seriously, unless its for benefits, payroll or any other sort of paper work, they are for the most part, useless. Especially when it comes to recruiting or promotions. It's like they could give a shit about the employees or the good of the company. They only care about making themselves fully in control.


Yes.

Dilbert hit the nail on the head with this one.
post #60 of 62
Thread Starter 
OMG: why would you (HR person) want to choose a candidate that addresses an email / cover letter personally to you, but you are unwilling to provide your name or the name of the hiring manager when I call and ask for it?
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