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european/slim fit suits and americans? - Page 2

post #16 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by HPress View Post
Slim fit suit: suit with narrow silhouette and narrow lapels.

Slim: Dunno, BMI 23 or 24 and under?

EDIT: I don't think there is any universal definition of a slim fit suit. In practice, it usually means little excess fabric. But on models and runways "slim fit" suits often fit pretty loosely.

Which is why I think a slim fit suit can look good on a non slim guy when it is slim fitting. Sure, if you're thinking about some gut world champion, everything probably looks terrible, but a stockier guy doesn't look bad because his suit is slim. Even a slim guy can have some proportions working against him to make the overall silhouette look worse imo than a stockier guy who is more proportionate.
post #17 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by cldpsu View Post
Which is why I think a slim fit suit can look good on a non slim guy when it is slim fitting. Sure, if you're thinking about some gut world champion, everything probably looks terrible, but a stockier guy doesn't look bad because his suit is slim. Even a slim guy can have some proportions working against him to make the overall silhouette look worse imo than a stockier guy who is more proportionate.

Let me take a step back. What I should have said is this. A classically tailored suit in the right size will almost always look as well (for slim guys) or be a better fit (for the rest) than what is currently marketed as a "slim fit suit."
post #18 of 30
CDC estimates: 5.7% of American adults extremely obese, 33.8% of American adults obese, 34.2% overweight. Among Americans above the age of 20, a healthy BMI (18.5-25) is a minority phenomenon. We can get into the relationships with class and race and income some other time--suffice it to say that it's hard to get fresh fruit in Detroit.
Quote:
Originally Posted by HPress View Post
Slim fit suit: suit with narrow silhouette and narrow lapels.
What of a Tom Ford suit, which is quite fitted but has broad shoulders and lapels?
post #19 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by HPress View Post
No, it is true. If you're not slim, a slim fit suit looks like shit. Most Americans are not slim.

When you see fabric billowing in the wind, it's usually because the suit is the wrong size, or because the pants are being worn too low.

Here are photos of someone who purchased a Benjamin suit in size 45R/46R or euro 56R (I think by definition, someone who wears a euro 56R is NOT slim). All he had altered was shortened the sleeves and hemmed the pants. I don't know how much he weighs, but he is about 5'6" or 5'7" and while the jacket is a little long for him, the slim fitted Lucente model looked so good that he never received so many compliments in his life:
LL
LL
post #20 of 30
Nothing worse than too slim suits. Looks like you ought to work in back-office wearing fuchsia shirts and ghastly ties.
post #21 of 30
The fatty mcfattster phenomenon is certainly true. But I have a BMI of 22, and wear a 44L/54L. (I'm tall and apparently one of my ancestors mated with a Yeti.)

But an equal part of the problem is people just don't know/care about fit. They buy cheap-ass suits and cheap-ass shirts that billow like sails because they think they're "more comfortable." This is one of misconceptions about fit - that if something is slim, it's intrinsically uncomfortable.
post #22 of 30
crosspost: The news host on the Bosnia and Hercegovina TV.
post #23 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by anuar View Post
crosspost:

The news host on the Bosnia and Hercegovina TV.

Hey.

Microcephaly is a serious condition.
post #24 of 30
As a 5'10" Light/Heavy Body Builder and part time Gigalo that weighs in at 210lbs in the off season and 190lbs in competition form I would not consider myself slim at all. Reporter Quick Jacket Unstructured/no padding 46R Oxxford Semi-structured/semi padded 46R Brioni Fully Structured/padded 46R I just noticed I need to get the middle sections taken in on the Reporter and Brioni...
post #25 of 30
My take is that 9 out of 10 slim fits suits are not really that slim, and will fit anybody in the correct size. Thus a 48R can wear a slim fit 48R. It is the high armholes, slimmer sleeves and a tighter waist, that make the suit slim fit, not just slim. The only people I see that have trouble with modern slim fit suits is the muscular and overly fit. Those slim sleeves that make us look so good don't allow enough room for the biceps that change that dramatically. Basically I agree with everything the ehaberdasher said...
post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick's Tailoring View Post
My take is that 9 out of 10 slim fits suits are not really that slim, and will fit anybody in the correct size. Thus a 48R can wear a slim fit 48R. It is the high armholes, slimmer sleeves and a tighter waist, that make the suit slim fit, not just slim. The only people I see that have trouble with modern slim fit suits is the muscular and overly fit. Those slim sleeves that make us look so good don't allow enough room for the biceps that change that dramatically.

And I agree with you, Rick! Slim usually does not mean euro runway slim where you have to wear a 38L, but definitely slimmer than 90% of the suits that are sold in mainstream America (JAB, MW, Macy's, BB) and slimmer than what most men are walking around in today. I believe the photos that we posted above of a client wearing a Benjamin suit proves that one can wear a "slim fit " suit, and look 10X better than had he donned something OTR that has heavier shoulder padding, low armholes and blousy pleated pants from one of the aforementioned retailers. From our experience also, it is only those who are extremely muscular with grossly enlarged arms, shoulders or lats who have trouble with these slimmer suits.
post #27 of 30
I'd take exception with the OP's contention that television types have endorsed the slim fit suit or even a suit that actually fits.

Last night I watched an unusual amount of TV (for me) in tracking the election results. I think I saw perhaps three suits that actually fit the wearer - the rest were at least one, probably two sizes too big, and most had massively padded shoulders. And these are on folks who have plenty of budget and/or stylists.

( And, from the Unsolved Mysteries Department, what's with the buttoning the top of a 3-buton suit? This always seems to amplify the stiffness of the chest and/or the poor fit of the armhole with any movement... )

More than the weight issue (which is real and amplified if you travel a lot and have to sit next to who's out there), I think that the general relaxation of dress has been driven by a belief that "looser is better."
These days, it seems that people just don't understand the basics or innate comfort of clothes that actually fit them.

Part of this is a bottom up trend from baggy street styles; part is a top down trend from retailers who peddle designs that can slide onto the most backs possible; and part is that folks just don't understand (or want to invest in) tailoring.

Whatever the cause, I just don't see slim fits as a trend that is being adopted by much of anybody.
post #28 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by junior varsity View Post
well it seems that main stream television and movies have pretty much accepted the slim fit suits.

Why dont main stream public also move towards slim fitting sillouette hugging suits and dress shirts??? Almost every guy you see is decked out in dress shirts and suits that fit like a tent.


It is one of the Great American Myths that "European cuts" are slim. Far from it in fact. The classical Italian cut such as Caraceni in the 1950s and onwards is actually rather easy. The classic Armani cut is also cut easy. The myth of the slim cut "European" style comes from the fact that cuts intended for the Italian (who has always been smaller and slimmer than their northern counterparts) fit Northern Europeans poorly.

Most industry cutters will make their cuts much larger and easier for the US market. There is a general perception that if they make it too close fitting, it won't sell.

For the record, although the Italian cut is classically easy (although there are changes to fashion), the classical Austro-German cut has always been much more razor sharp and clean.
post #29 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sator View Post
It is one of the Great American Myths that "European cuts" are slim. Far from it in fact. The classical Italian cut such as Caraceni in the 1950s and onwards is actually rather easy. The classic Armani cut is also cut easy. The myth of the slim cut "European" style comes from the fact that cuts intended for the Italian (who has always been smaller and slimmer than their northern counterparts) fit Northern Europeans poorly.

Most industry cutters will make their cuts much larger and easier for the US market. There is a general perception that if they make it too close fitting, it won't sell.

For the record, although the Italian cut is classically easy (although there are changes to fashion), the classical Austro-German cut has always been much more razor sharp and clean.

I'm not sure about that. We travel to Italy several times a year, and ALL the men wear their clothing slim and fitted, and in many cases it is MUCH more fitted such that the clothing would be considered not just "slim" or "fitted", but "TIGHT" here in the US. Don't know about Caraceni, but to my understanding, Armani is geared towards the Non-Italians and that's why the cut is easy.

In addition, earlier this year I read an interview (in WWD, I believe) with a senior rep at Hugo Boss who spoke of how, for the first time ever, Hugo Boss did not have to change the model sold to the US, and that Americans are finally starting to understand and embrace a more fitted European silhouette.
post #30 of 30
I would say what is considered slim in the US is often bigger then what is considered classic (aka baggy) here in Italy. Obviously not everybody in Italy is in shape. Not everybody likes form fitted clothing. But I can buy things far more fitted then you'd find in the US. I'm not exactly carry any extra weight either. So if it fits me that's saying something.
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