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my visit to Napoli & Mina @ Napoli Su Misura - Page 155

post #2311 of 3961
it's actually in Santa Monica
post #2312 of 3961
Might be mixed up where we went. Are there two locations?
post #2313 of 3961
Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post

Might be mixed up where we went. Are there two locations?
I don't think so. foodguy would know
post #2314 of 3961
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

I've never heard of fresco cracking but it definitely has a rougher, stiffer feel than other worsteds. I think that's the ply and twist of the yarns. I just don't think it's possible to make an open weave that feels smooth and soft. It's sort of like a screen door. You couldn't make a screen with soft string, it takes wire. For fresco, the yarn has to be a bit wiry or the cloth simply will not hold up.
Thanks. For a second there, I though I'd ordered some expensive disposables.
post #2315 of 3961
I've actually never had a mohair crack, I just know that it can. From what I have been told, the more mohair in the blend, the higher the risk. Cloth makers know this, hence you almost never see a cloth with more than 40% mohair. That's the safe level, I believe.

I wouldn't want want with more than that anyway, the resulting cloth would be way too shiney and stiff for me.
post #2316 of 3961
Have only seen mohair split/crack once. More common to have flannel wear thru and tear. Happened on two of my own trousers this year.
post #2317 of 3961
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

I don't think so. foodguy would know

Santa Monica. I don't think there is a Main St. In BH.
post #2318 of 3961
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

I've actually never had a mohair crack, I just know that it can. From what I have been told, the more mohair in the blend, the higher the risk. Cloth makers know this, hence you almost never see a cloth with more than 40% mohair. That's the safe level, I believe.

I wouldn't want want with more than that anyway, the resulting cloth would be way too shiney and stiff for me.
Harrison's Cape Kid is at 60% Kid Mohair
post #2319 of 3961
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

"dry hand" to me basically means "not shiney." I really, really hate shiney cloth, except mohair, and even then I prefer the drier mohairs to the truly shiny ones.

Some may disagree but to me basically all of Lesser's worsteds (wearing one today) have a dry hand.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post

Fair enough. Most of us, however, refer to the hand (the feel) and not the degree of lustre in the finish (otherwise all flannels would be considered "dry"). "Dry" often refers to cloth that feels slightly brittle, like it had been baked at a very high temperature, or woven from over-processed yarns; think human hair that has been bleached one too many times. The opposite is often referred to as "round" and has more spring to it. Hard to accurately describe.

The Harrison's folk seem to use "dry" the way Manton does:
Quote:
Dear___,

P&B Fine Classics is like Lessers 13oz a two fold 52s yarn just not so heavy.. its means The lesser cloth has more picks and ends (ie more yarn) The Finish is Perfectaset which is not uncommon in our trade, meaning it has being soured and blown making the cloth softer to handle .Lesser have what is known in the trade as a Lesser finish which is basically very little which give the cloth its dry handle and very West End Savile Row feel.Oyster althought a 2/48 has a different finish again to make it firm but not so hard as the Lessers 13oz.
The consideration also has to be made that all 3 cloths are made on different looms which in general gives the ranges their own unique characteristic.
post #2320 of 3961
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

Harrison's Cape Kid is at 60% Kid Mohair
No wonder I never liked it!
post #2321 of 3961
Quote:
The Harrison's folk seem to use "dry" the way Manton does:

The way I read it they are using the term the way Jefferyd and I do. They are saying it gives the cloth a "hardness" and that makes it less desirable to work with IMO. The dry hand is the problem I have with Lesser
Quote:
has a different finish again to make it firm but not so hard as the Lessers 13oz.
post #2322 of 3961
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

No wonder I never liked it!

IMO, that cloth is for disco singers.
post #2323 of 3961
Quote:
Originally Posted by bboysdontcryy View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

No wonder I never liked it!

IMO, that cloth is for disco singers.

Rat Pack approved
post #2324 of 3961
So, I recall these two memes from literature. One was that shiny suits are low class, gangster, gigolo, etc. Think Michael Coreleone in Tahoe. Shiny=flashy. Possibly expensive, but low taste.

The second, which is a bit older, is that shiny=cheap. An old worn out suit shines as it ages, especially at the elbows, knees, and seat of pants. It was considered, as long ago as in Victorian novels, as the sign of someone who bought cheap clothes in the first place and then tried to get too many years out of them.

Make of that what you will.

OTOH, Sherlock Holmes at one point cites re-soling boots as a sign of poverty whereas I think it's just good sense.
post #2325 of 3961
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

Harrison's Cape Kid is at 60% Kid Mohair

I believe the original Dormeuil Tonik was 90% mohair. Halstead makes 100% mohair cloth that I have seen. I also picked up 100% mohair jacketing from Tip Top that is not particularly shiny.
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