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High Satisfaction Jobs - Page 3

post #31 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shopparel View Post
This is why I worked in banking for a while. I love the pressure and long hours. If the job isn't risky and challenging, I'm not interested.

Odd, when I was younger, I thought the same way. I spent a lot of time wearing all kinds of chemical protective suits and such.

Now that I'm older, I keep thinking "do I really want to be wearing all that shit anymore?"
post #32 of 92
it must be a gen-y thing that makes people believe everyone is entitled to have a job they love and makes them eternally happy. it seems even worse amongst the middle class.

work is work because it isnt fun. if it was fun or very rewarding people would do it for free. the trick is to do what you are good at, make a niche for yourself and have a positive outlook.

ill give you the tip, people who love their jobs would probably love a vast range of jobs. its their positive attitude towards life more than the actual job itself.
post #33 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Herbert View Post
the trick is to do what you are good at, make a niche for yourself and have a positive outlook.

TRUTH.

Few years back I got a gig at a startup doing customer support; in short order they'd transferred me to the development side for reporting and database stuff. Now the company is very financially stable and I'm making a reasonable salary, about to get married and buy a house, respected by colleagues, promoted last month, with enough spare time at the office to post on SF now and then... all from the qualities Mr Herbert posted up there. It's for damn sure it wasn't due to my worthless music degree.

ps: Think long and hard about being a vet tech. Maybe go to the busiest local practice you can find and ask to hang around for a few hours and observe. It burns folks out like you wouldn't believe -- you've really gotta love what you do to handle that sort of thing.
post #34 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flambeur View Post
didn't you come from a well-off family to begin with?
Not at all. There were many times we were barely living just beyond homelessness. That and a drug addicted step-parent were major disadvantages but when you've got your back against the wall and you don't want to be another terrible statistic you tend to work your ass off.
post #35 of 92
not having read all the responses... I'll just say this - your life and your desires, motivations, priorities, etc WILL all change. What's sufficient now will not be in the future. Make sure you're setting yourself up to take care of whatever comes 'round the corner.
post #36 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by CouttsClient View Post
Not at all. There were many times we were barely living just beyond homelessness. That and a drug addicted step-parent were major disadvantages but when you've got your back against the wall and you don't want to be another terrible statistic you tend to work your ass off.

Cool, for some reason I thought that you were a trust fund baby.
post #37 of 92
One more thing to think about: I remember reading various studies that show happiness is only about 10% circumstancial, whereas your attitude accounts for about 50% of your happiness. So a good attitude in a bad situation should make for a relatively happier person than someone in a good situation with a bad attitude.
post #38 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by v.freeman View Post
CFA is worthless without any experience. You'll be spending hundreds of hours for an additional three letters next to your name, but it doesn't really matter that much unless you're already in the industry. As someone studying for Level 2, I will tell you it sucks. Horribly.

CFA doesn't exist without experience. The only qualifications to take the exam are a college degree or four years of experience in the industry, but to actually get the charter and the right to use the letters, you have to have the four years of experience.
post #39 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flambeur View Post
Cool, for some reason I thought that you were a trust fund baby.

What's with the "eat the rich" mindset?
post #40 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by newinny View Post
What's with the "eat the rich" mindset?

me? are you new here?

post #41 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flambeur View Post
Cool, for some reason I thought that you were a trust fund baby.
No no...far from it. VERY far.
post #42 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Milpool View Post
If you like the science but don't like being in a lab, try physical chem or even physics. Lots of good options there.
Curious what options you're talking about here. I have a PhD in physical chemistry so I'm familiar with the field, just wondering what you were thinking about. I did the whole lab thing through grad school, teaching now, and trying to move to industry next year. Planning on getting a few years of experience then moving to either government policy or lobbying. Depends on how badly I want my soul, I guess.
post #43 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gibonius View Post
Curious what options you're talking about here. I have a PhD in physical chemistry so I'm familiar with the field, just wondering what you were thinking about. I did the whole lab thing through grad school, teaching now, and trying to move to industry next year. Planning on getting a few years of experience then moving to either government policy or lobbying. Depends on how badly I want my soul, I guess.

My friends in chemistry are all currently bemoaning the collapse of the pharma and biochem hiring crazes, and are scrambling for any teaching gig they can find. There are some petro opportunities, depending on your geographic preferences, but apparently not enough for everyone.

I left physics long ago. There aren't a whole lot of "physicist" jobs, but people with advanced degrees in the subject seem to always land on their feet - just often in very surprising places.
post #44 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gibonius View Post
Curious what options you're talking about here. I have a PhD in physical chemistry so I'm familiar with the field, just wondering what you were thinking about. I did the whole lab thing through grad school, teaching now, and trying to move to industry next year. Planning on getting a few years of experience then moving to either government policy or lobbying. Depends on how badly I want my soul, I guess.

Computer simulation primarily. It is a direction that I see most probably because it is the direction that life seems to be taking me. I talked to a guy the other day in p-chem that said he never even touched a pipette during his PhD. His dissertation was entirely computational.

With computer costs going down and power going up so quickly, simulation is getting to be a very cheap option to test lots of things before spending the money to actually try them.
post #45 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by photoguy View Post

I left physics long ago. There aren't a whole lot of "physicist" jobs, but people with advanced degrees in the subject seem to always land on their feet - just often in very surprising places.

Disagree entirely. Over the next several years, I expect the shortfall will be HUGE. It is brutally hard to find good people right now.

Of course, that doesn't mean I get a raise this year.
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