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High Satisfaction Jobs

post #1 of 92
Thread Starter 
Ibankers, accountants, consultants, etc. need not worry about this thread. Background: I worked every summer since before it was legal for me to do so as an electrician. I got my license when I was 16 and loved working. Wake up at 5:30, take it easy, to work by 7, done by 5, either chill with the guys after work or go home and bitch about it for 5 minutes if someone would listen, and then repeat except on the occasional Sunday. No office, minimal paperwork, tangible results from your work, great group of people, and it was satisfying. I fantasize about this shit every day of the week. Currently: I don't use my TV, love sleeping on my futon, eat meals that are satisfying enough every day at $20/week. I've been biking more, boxing, working out, and volunteering at the animal shelter frequently. This is the happiest I've been in ages, even though I'm living on relatively little. It's been a bit of a revelation that I don't actually need the GQ/Esquire lifestyle to be happy. That lead to me looking at what I actually want in life: a good dog (probably adopted puppy if everything is in order, but dog gets expensive), a wrecked SV650 (1.2-1.4K), mountain bike trails, boxing ($40-80/month), surfing, a library card, chill people/friends, a satisfying job, and lots of human interaction. It's an oversimplified list, but I've been managing fine on $50 a week for a while now. The plan: I'm a finance major, but only halfway through sophomore year. If it was doable, I'd go for history of western civilization, organic chemistry (I love the science, hate lab work) or literature. Currently I'm thinking about finishing finance, getting a job as an electrician again (if any are available- contractors are taking projects at a loss in Austin, and government work is the only thing available at the moment), get my journeyman's license, work as a journeyman while I work toward my CFA, and then get a "real job." Plans change though; electrical gigs aren't always available, and I'd probably go batshit if I got my CFA and was stuck in an office- 100k and up or not. I'm looking for alternative jobs that are satisfying and involve people (I found out recently that I get severely depressed without people around). I've been looking at: firefighter, emt/paramedic, vet tech (I think a degree may be required for this one though), and mechanic. Anyone have any recommendations or experience with regards to jobs that you're happy to go to? If the pay can cover a cheap apartment, gas, a dog, cheap food, and boxing (most of the rest of the things are one time costs), then I'm happy with it. If there's a little left over at the end of the month, that's even better. I'm also somewhat interested in the jobs that require a bit of education. If I remember correctly, Pio has an MPH, and seems like it's something with high satisfaction. I just don't want to end up worth 8 figures and hating life. I don't want to be AB/Metro either. *Sorry about the length and the wordiness- ephedrine does this to me sometimes.
post #2 of 92
If you like the science but don't like being in a lab, try physical chem or even physics. Lots of good options there.

If you are good at math (and I mean really good at math) and like working with your hands, I'd strongly suggest thinking about physics.

Since you are enjoying electrical work, think about electrical engineering. With the right job, you could be doing tons of hands on work there too.

To be a paramedic, you'll need an AS degree in paramedic science. EMT is usually 150 hours of training or so. Firefighter is a lot of training too. I was EMT certified in the past due to the nature of my career.
post #3 of 92
You seem to have figured out the key to contentment. I wish I could say the same about myself.
post #4 of 92
Ever thought about the more hands on science or engineering roles, mainly in the mining industry?

Exploration geologists spend weeks living in a tent out in the bush - they love it, just like camping they tell me.

Mining engineers get to do the computer stuff but also get underground and help out with the mining operations.

I'm a mining engineer by profession but have changed course slightly to geotechnical engineer. I'd actually encourage my kids to go into mining - its so varied, demanding and hands on. Part of my training is to spend a few years underground on crew, so if I ever get sick of office work, and I can take a 6 month contract as a miner.

For example, I often get asked to cover someone on short notice. So one week I'll be in our city office, and then the next few months I'll be in the middle of the bush supervising drillers and logging core.

I am flying to Vancouver this Saturday because a client asked me to inspect an old underground gold mine in Alaska and advise on mining methods. Should be a great trip.

I do get a kick out of it when you go and visit a mine, and you are standing on top of a hill overlooking a mammoth open cut and you think 'fuck yeah i designed that'.
post #5 of 92
Why shit on banking, consulting, etc? They're broad categories and contain some very satisfying roles.
post #6 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by newinny View Post
Why shit on banking, consulting, etc? They're broad categories and contain some very satisfying roles.

It's a rat race with high pressure and heavy work hours I'd assume.
post #7 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by HgaleK View Post
I just don't want to end up worth 8 figures and hating life.

When you have your 8 figures and are able to make your loved ones' dreams reality, it would be pretty hard to hate life.
post #8 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by MasterOfReality View Post

I'm a mining engineer by profession but have changed course slightly to geotechnical engineer. I'd actually encourage my kids to go into mining - its so varied, demanding and hands on. Part of my training is to spend a few years underground on crew, so if I ever get sick of office work, and I can take a 6 month contract as a miner.

For example, I often get asked to cover someone on short notice. So one week I'll be in our city office, and then the next few months I'll be in the middle of the bush supervising drillers and logging core.

.....

I do get a kick out of it when you go and visit a mine, and you are standing on top of a hill overlooking a mammoth open cut and you think 'fuck yeah i designed that'.

This sounds like an AWESOME job!
post #9 of 92
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Butter View Post
When you have your 8 figures and are able to make your loved ones' dreams reality, it would be pretty hard to hate life.
That's the deal. I don't want kids, and don't want a wife. I would do the same thing my folks did if that were the case, but it's not. As it stands, they're just now starting to actually experience personal benefit from the money in such a way that it's may be worth the bullshit that it took to make it. They managed to miss out on 30 years of their life to get there though. Thanks for the responses, yall- I'm looking in to everything right now.
post #10 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Butter View Post
When you have your 8 figures and are able to make your loved ones' dreams reality, it would be pretty hard to hate life.

This is my motivation for creating wealth. I am perfectly happy with an average lifestyle, but I want to be well off so that I can support my family. My family has done so much for me (financially, etc.) to get me where I am at today and I want to be able to do the same for my family. When my kids get accepted into Ivy League I want to be able to afford tuition.
post #11 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by HgaleK View Post
That's the deal. I don't want kids, and don't want a wife. I would do the same thing my folks did if that were the case, but it's not. As it stands, they're just now starting to actually experience personal benefit from the money in such a way that it's may be worth the bullshit that it took to make it. They managed to miss out on 30 years of their life to get there though.

Thanks for the responses, yall- I'm looking in to everything right now.

When I was in college I didn't want to get married or have kids either. Now I'm married and I will be having kids sometime in the future. One thing I have learned is that you never know how you will feel in the future. But the cool thing about life is that few things are permanent, like your career.
post #12 of 92
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConcernedParent View Post
It's a rat race with high pressure and heavy work hours I'd assume.

If it's good work, I don't mind heavy work hours. I worked 50-70 hours a week as an electrician. It's the rat race, stuck behind a monitor playing with excel, in a secluded office, no movement thing that gets me. Trying to one up homeboy in the cubicle next to me so that I might get position x in order to look good for my application to company y for position z as I get a carpel tunnel and monitor burn at 2 in the morning isn't my idea of satisfying. That said, I would hate occupying a mediocre position if I did get in to the financial field, and would be that dude.
post #13 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by HgaleK View Post
That said, I would hate occupying a mediocre position if I did get in to the financial field, and would be that dude.

Ain't nothing wrong being "that dude." Even "that dude" makes obscene bonuses simply for being in the financial field.

If family is not part of your picture, and you're willing to pay your dues, you should definitely stick with finance since you're on track.
post #14 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by MasterOfReality View Post
Ever thought about the more hands on science or engineering roles, mainly in the mining industry?

Exploration geologists spend weeks living in a tent out in the bush - they love it, just like camping they tell me.

Mining engineers get to do the computer stuff but also get underground and help out with the mining operations.

I'm a mining engineer by profession but have changed course slightly to geotechnical engineer. I'd actually encourage my kids to go into mining - its so varied, demanding and hands on. Part of my training is to spend a few years underground on crew, so if I ever get sick of office work, and I can take a 6 month contract as a miner.

For example, I often get asked to cover someone on short notice. So one week I'll be in our city office, and then the next few months I'll be in the middle of the bush supervising drillers and logging core.

I am flying to Vancouver this Saturday because a client asked me to inspect an old underground gold mine in Alaska and advise on mining methods. Should be a great trip.

I do get a kick out of it when you go and visit a mine, and you are standing on top of a hill overlooking a mammoth open cut and you think 'fuck yeah i designed that'.

I never thought that a hole in the ground could be 'designed', but I guess that makes sense. Do you ever feel remorse for having fucked up God's creation?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Butter View Post
When you have your 8 figures and are able to make your loved ones' dreams reality, it would be pretty hard to hate life.

Why do they love you? For the money? Or for the time you don't spend with them? (I'm just being a brat here).


Quote:
Originally Posted by ConcernedParent View Post
It's a rat race with high pressure and heavy work hours I'd assume.

Don't forget attorney in that group. An old friend who has slaved for years at a firm used to get up and leave in the middle of Sunday brunch when his blackberry would call him to the office at 11 in the morning. We don't really talk anymore, but I'm sure he's very happy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KentuckyDerby View Post
This is my motivation for creating wealth. I am perfectly happy with an average lifestyle, but I want to be well off so that I can support my family. My family has done so much for me (financially, etc.) to get me where I am at today and I want to be able to do the same for my family. When my kids get accepted into Ivy League I want to be able to afford tuition.

If I could start over, I'd be a doctor. I think it's the most brilliant career. You make good money, you help people, and you work with people (or you don't, depending on your specialty and preference). It's perfect. That or engineer because I like to tinker with things.
post #15 of 92
The most fulfilling career is the one that makes you happy. If working 80 hours a week and making 7 figures makes you happy or if you work 10 hours a week and live a completely minimal life, it doesn't matter, as long as either one makes you happy.
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