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Replica modern art on the cheap - Page 6

post #76 of 100
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by designprofessor
If you go the do -it yourself route, you'll get just that. a painting that looks cheap and like it was done with masking tape.
By cheap I mean less than $50. That pretty much excludes everything except DIY. You don't think I can do something like this with masking tape? http://www.doc.ic.ac.uk/~rac101/draw...n.cgi?preset=4
post #77 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by caelte
I don't have a counter argument because your statement doesn't really make sense.

If I try to understand it, I would say you are referring to the ability of an object to represent the process of the artist and convey it across a distance or gap.
Is that what you are saying?

A person of great artistic ability conveys more of the process than one of lesser ability?

I look at art as the final product of a process that probably is most evident in the photograph.

There is the image and there is the content of the image.

Most appreciate the image, I tend to like the content.
The artist conveys the content through the image.
Some are really great at this, but it is never more than a facsimile of the real thing.

The artist may be the only one who recieves the artistic experience.
What is left for the rest of us is a kind of after image that then gets traded and develops value, but it's real use is long over.

Firstly, I am happy to have you on this forum.

My statement was a personal observation, one that evolved as an artist who bases his work on daily practice. The process of making things is, I have also discovered, a major facet of what you termed the artistic experience. However, there is another artistic experience that I am interested in, and that is when the object is placed in public. Then something else is possible, isn't it? The object has the potential to become something encountered. What happens when a person encounters something that an artist has made? What happens when we allow ourselves to perceive art as a space and art as an occasion as well as art as an object and art as a process? Art becomes an interface. Art becomes an interaction. Art becomes a path. Art becomes a mode of communication. Art becomes something that occurs in the gap between the person and the object encountered. The question then becomes, do we show up? And, is showing up, and the risk we take by showing up, more valuable than the pricetag placed on the object by collectors? These are some of the thoughts on the forefront of my mind when I enter a space someone has created in order to show their work. It is also the aethestic I try to achieve when I create a space for someone to encounter my work. All of this is to say, I think the person who encounters art is having a very important experience. It is a personal experience, for that person, but also important to the vitality of the community.
post #78 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
For artists to achieve fame and fortune, they need someone prominent to prop them up.

For Pollock and his Abstract Expressionists, they had Clement Greenburg; for Picasso there was Gertrude Stein; for Diane Arbus it was John Szarkowski.

There is conspiracy theory rumours that the CIA 'funded' Pollock, several links down the buying chain, because it related somehow to their anti-communist agenda.

Edit - hardly a searing indictment of the CIA - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abstract_expressionism#CIA - but it somewhat undermines the notion of abstract expressionism being the epitome of anti-establishment.
post #79 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kent Wang
By cheap I mean less than $50. That pretty much excludes everything except DIY.

You don't think I can do something like this with masking tape?



http://www.doc.ic.ac.uk/~rac101/draw...n.cgi?preset=4
I'm sure you could do something like that. If that is where you want your painting to go and what you want it to look like. I have nothing against cheap materials or someone
picking up the tools and doing a painting, that's great.
It will be interesting to see how far you take these works.

post pics.
post #80 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnapril
Firstly, I am happy to have you on this forum.

My statement was a personal observation, one that evolved as an artist who bases his work on daily practice. The process of making things is, I have also discovered, a major facet of what you termed the artistic experience. However, there is another artistic experience that I am interested in, and that is when the object is placed in public. Then something else is possible, isn't it? The object has the potential to become something encountered. What happens when a person encounters something that an artist has made? What happens when we allow ourselves to perceive art as a space and art as an occasion as well as art as an object and art as a process? Art becomes an interface. Art becomes an interaction. Art becomes a path. Art becomes a mode of communication. Art becomes something that occurs in the gap between the person and the object encountered. The question then becomes, do we show up? And, is showing up, and the risk we take by showing up, more valuable than the pricetag placed on the object by collectors? These are some of the thoughts on the forefront of my mind when I enter a space someone has created in order to show their work. It is also the aethestic I try to achieve when I create a space for someone to encounter my work. All of this is to say, I think the person who encounters art is having a very important experience. It is a personal experience, for that person, but also important to the vitality of the community.

I understand, and agree.
By "gap", you mean path, a path of transference, yes?
By "showng up", you mean honest intent? The part of the process that I am mainly referring to.

I would like to see the traditional way of viewing art, as you have described it, destroyed.
It is a convention that, in my opinion, subjugates the artist to a position below the viewer. The positions should be equal and seamless.

Most artists would not agree, I know, but I would prefer a way of understanding art that is more inclusive of the entire creative process.
The idea that a work of art is like a child you send off into the world is a little too self-suffering for me.The idea of a division between a period of creation and a new life as an object viewed, seems loaded up with the conventions and the stereotypes of the past.

I like art that melts or disappears or the only remnant is a photograph.
I like art "happenings", where the viewer becomes part of of the art.

But when it come to art that can be traded and lumbers through history with the baggage of being made a commodity, I would like to see the artists get a residual, and not be left behind in the dust as just another tragic story of how little the artist recieved for the original work.

I apologize if I seemed flippant in my dismissal of your original statement.
post #81 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by caelte
I understand, and agree.
By "gap", you mean path, a path of transference, yes?
By "showng up", you mean honest intent? The part of the process that I am mainly referring to.

I would like to see the traditional way of viewing art, as you have described it, destroyed.
It is a convention that, in my opinion, subjugates the artist to a position below the viewer. The positions should be equal and seamless.

Most artists would not agree, I know, but I would prefer a way of understanding art that is more inclusive of the entire creative process.
The idea that a work of art is like a child you send off into the world is a little too self-suffering for me.The idea of a division between a period of creation and a new life as an object viewed, seems loaded up with the conventions and the stereotypes of the past.

I like art that melts or disappears or the only remnant is a photograph.
I like art "happenings", where the viewer becomes part of of the art.

But when it come to art that can be traded and lumbers through history with the baggage of being made a commodity, I would like to see the artists get a residual, and not be left behind in the dust as just another tragic story of how little the artist recieved for the original work.

I apologize if I seemed flippant in my dismissal of your original statement.

Very interesting and helpful. Thanks for spending some time to flesh out your ideas.

John
post #82 of 100
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by designprofessor
I'm sure you could do something like that. If that is where you want your painting to go and what you want it to look like. I have nothing against cheap materials or someone picking up the tools and doing a painting, that's great. It will be interesting to see how far you take these works. post pics.
Thank you for your words of encouragement. I have never been much of an creative person so even I am a bit surprised that I have taken a liking to this hobby.
post #83 of 100
How do you weed out the bad art when searching on Ebay? There is so much crap. I suspect that, like clothing, you just have to wade through the junk to find good stuff (assuming, of course, that you know what the good stuff actually is), but are there any sellers that are known to carry good pieces, or other shortcuts? It seems overwhelming to an absolute novice.
post #84 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mentos
How do you weed out the bad art when searching on Ebay? There is so much crap. I suspect that, like clothing, you just have to wade through the junk to find good stuff (assuming, of course, that you know what the good stuff actually is), but are there any sellers that are known to carry good pieces, or other shortcuts? It seems overwhelming to an absolute novice.

Its going to be subjective - a judgement call.
Galleries will have artists bios. Some buyers put emphasis on these credentials. Check for gallery /professional status of the artist. Ask to review more images. Might also look at any artist's statement -which will explain what the artwork's intent /meaning.
Trust your gut -but you can also do your homwwork before
dropping any money.
post #85 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mentos
How do you weed out the bad art when searching on Ebay? There is so much crap. I suspect that, like clothing, you just have to wade through the junk to find good stuff (assuming, of course, that you know what the good stuff actually is), but are there any sellers that are known to carry good pieces, or other shortcuts? It seems overwhelming to an absolute novice.
Don't buy it on ebay. Go see art in person, at local galleries, etc. Particularly as a novice, it's important to really get to know pieces and your responses to them. Going to shows, galleries, etc. also gives you the opportunity to educate yourself, to talk to artists, gallerists (just keep in mind they are also salespeople), and collectors. Ease your way in by buying inexpensive pieces that appeal to you. In addition to galleries carrying emerging artists, art schools and colleges often have student shows, at which you likely will see a variety of different media and styles.
post #86 of 100
Thanks for the advice, guys. Ebay offers an attractive avenue to the amateur. As I'm sure you can imagine, the prospect of dealing with a gallery seems intimidating--no matter how I might rail on about how art is human expression at its most refined, and that any pretension that attempts to intrude into the viewer's experience must be rejected, I still feel like a schlub when shuffling around a gallery. But I suppose I just need to grow a pair--shouldn't let others' cynical pretension get in the way of my fun. Esp because most of the cynical pretension is probably in my head.
post #87 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mentos
Thanks for the advice, guys. Ebay offers an attractive avenue to the amateur. As I'm sure you can imagine, the prospect of dealing with a gallery seems intimidating--no matter how I might rail on about how art is human expression at its most refined, and that any pretension that attempts to intrude into the viewer's experience must be rejected, I still feel like a schlub when shuffling around a gallery. But I suppose I just need to grow a pair--shouldn't let others' cynical pretension get in the way of my fun. Esp because most of the cynical pretension is probably in my head.

Lawyerdad's advice is perfect.

I know what you mean about the gallery, about it being intimidating.

I've had work in galleries over the years and I still don't feel comfortable in some of them. Most of them are like any other retail establishment, they are usually ready to educate.

My advice is, make a decision and buy something, because it will kick start the process of getting to know art.

Once you've actually bought something your treatment at a gallery will improve radically because you won't feel so out of it when you walk in the next time.

Don't use artspeak unless you know what you are saying.
post #88 of 100
You can sometimes find authentic artworks by well-known people on eBay, usually as a sort of Live Auction.
post #89 of 100
The snobbery /gallery intimidation is a bit of a bummer. Galleries have to push work to keep the doors open.
Get to know the artist. Most are approachable and like it that people are interested in the work. Like other things, the more you know, the deeper the appreciation-or dislike, in some cases.
post #90 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by caelte
Don't use artspeak unless you know what you are saying.
I say don't use artspeak even if you do, unless strictly necessary to get your point across. Very good advice in the previous posts, I think. Another thing: The importance of doing your homework before buying just cannot be stressed enough, not just on specific artists, but on their schools and "schools", some grounding in recent art history/theory etc. Most collectors get rid of much of their earlier acquisitions, but on the other hand it's learning experience. Art scene gossip and feuding is almost as good, but of course less reliable.
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