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Replica modern art on the cheap - Page 5

post #61 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnapril
Art is the gap between the person and the object.
Hmmmm, no
post #62 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian SD
The biggest misconception about the value of art is that people wrongfully assume that art gains value by the expression of it, the technical skill of it, etc. If such a thing was true, people such as Jackson Pollock, who was considered the greatest American painter during his time, would not have been dirt poor.
I am pretty sure that Pollock was not broke when he died. He had become quite famous years before his death and his gallery prices were pretty high by the time that he died.

The starving artist whose work becomes valuable after death is a bit of an urban legend these days. There is too much money chasing art now for somebody to go undiscovered for an entire career. Also, with good psychiatric services available nowadays, artists are living much longer.
post #63 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt
I am pretty sure that Pollock was not broke when he died. He had become quite famous years before his death and his gallery prices were pretty high by the time that he died.

The starving artist whose work becomes valuable after death is a bit of an urban legend these days. There is too much money chasing art now for somebody to go undiscovered for an entire career. Also, with good psychiatric services available nowadays, artists are living much longer.

How would you know the ones that weren't discovered?
Most collectable art continues to escalate in value and becomes more valuable after an artist's death because death guarantees rarity.

I was at a conceptual art installation near where I live in a small obscure gallery although it is well known in the area.
The work was ten years of effort by a woman who has a good resume'
but is totally unknown.
She is approaching 70 and works in the stock room of a local ice cream shop.
The work was astounding.
When you walk into the room all you see is what appears to be hassocks on
white pedestals.
There are windows on the sides of the objects with dimly lit interiors within.
They are so dark inside you have to let your eyes adjust to the light.
I can't stop thinking about it.

The curator told me that most people are puzzled by it.
It is so different that it won't be understood until after her death.

Van Gogh is the best example of the starving artist who becomes valuable after death.
One of his paintings was found being used as a door on a chicken coop.
Not an example of our time?
I don't think our time is any more accepting of things outside the norm than Van Gogh's time.

Most of the artists I know are more sane than the general population.
I think what they lack is marketing skills.
post #64 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by caelte
Hmmmm, no

What's your counter argument?
post #65 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kent Wang
I spraypainted these and put them up in the garage.

Nice job - they look good.
post #66 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by caelte
I was at a conceptual art installation near where I live in a small obscure gallery although it is well known in the area.
The work was ten years of effort by a woman who has a good resume'
but is totally unknown.
She is approaching 70 and works in the stock room of a local ice cream shop.
The work was astounding.
When you walk into the room all you see is what appears to be hassocks on
white pedestals.
There are windows on the sides of the objects with dimly lit interiors within.
They are so dark inside you have to let your eyes adjust to the light.
I can't stop thinking about it.

Art is the gap between the person and the object.
post #67 of 100
For artists to achieve fame and fortune, they need someone prominent to prop them up.

For Pollock and his Abstract Expressionists, they had Clement Greenburg; for Picasso there was Gertrude Stein; for Diane Arbus it was John Szarkowski.
post #68 of 100
Thread Starter 
I did the garage ones first. They look OK but are a little too playschool for my decor. I then did these, inspired by my desktop wallpaper.
post #69 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by caelte
How would you know the ones that weren't discovered?
Most collectable art continues to escalate in value and becomes more valuable after an artist's death because death guarantees rarity.

I was at a conceptual art installation near where I live in a small obscure gallery although it is well known in the area.
The work was ten years of effort by a woman who has a good resume'
but is totally unknown.
She is approaching 70 and works in the stock room of a local ice cream shop.
The work was astounding.
When you walk into the room all you see is what appears to be hassocks on
white pedestals.
There are windows on the sides of the objects with dimly lit interiors within.
They are so dark inside you have to let your eyes adjust to the light.
I can't stop thinking about it.

The curator told me that most people are puzzled by it.
It is so different that it won't be understood until after her death.

Van Gogh is the best example of the starving artist who becomes valuable after death.
One of his paintings was found being used as a door on a chicken coop.
Not an example of our time?
I don't think our time is any more accepting of things outside the norm than Van Gogh's time.

Most of the artists I know are more sane than the general population.
I think what they lack is marketing skills.
Mark, What I meant might have come out wrong. I meant that in today's art world, ten out of every three talented artists are discovered by somebody. While there may be talents that are undiscovered while living, they are pretty unlikely to be undiscovered in death as well. Van Gogh was another time. While we may not be more accepting of new ideas now, we sould like to portray ourselves as being so, and therefore try to pretend to accept art. Artists are no more or less sane than the average population. They do tend to work long periods solo which tends to exacerbate any existing psychological condition. Most of us work with others and are forced to maintain. Many of them are terrific marketers and many are not.
post #70 of 100
I'm sure the majority of artists are rather sane; however, I am convinced there are certain types who are inexplicably and decidely unaverage. For example, William Eggleston is rather "strange" in the common vernacular.
post #71 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
For artists to achieve fame and fortune, they need someone prominent to prop them up.

For Pollock and his Abstract Expressionists, they had Clement Greenburg; for Picasso there was Gertrude Stein; for Diane Arbus it was John Szarkowski.

This isn't really exclusive to art -it sound like every other form of business in the world today.

I'm sure Nike would sell shoes to some degree -but the fact that they bought the image of Jordan and Tiger Woods certainly helps push product.

There's an interesting article in the new Vanity Fair which illuminates the subject of this thread. There's ALOT of money in the art market now. What should be discussed here is not only the art but the buyers intention. A fair amount of time it is less about the art and more about the speculation on potential profit re -sale /auction.
In that way it seems to mirror a Wall Street buying frenzy -irregardless of what the artist /concept is.
post #72 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt
Mark,

What I meant might have come out wrong.

I meant that in today's art world, ten out of every three talented artists are discovered by somebody. While there may be talents that are undiscovered while living, they are pretty unlikely to be undiscovered in death as well.

Van Gogh was another time. While we may not be more accepting of new ideas now, we sould like to portray ourselves as being so, and therefore try to pretend to accept art.

Artists are no more or less sane than the average population. They do tend to work long periods solo which tends to exacerbate any existing psychological condition. Most of us work with others and are forced to maintain. Many of them are terrific marketers and many are not.

I don't think there is any other way to get known as an artist other than to be "discovered".
It is always a case of of having someone who can put "muscle" behind the artist either in prestige or PR and validate the art so the rest of us can then accept it as authentic.

I think artists are more or less sane depending on their proclivity to understand reality. By the virtue of being an artist they tend to be self reflective and analytical.I don't believe the general population thinks this way. Most lawyers I've known work long hours solo and they are among the most sane, pragmatic people I've known.(Of course there was that freakin' crazy guy I had in the accident case.)

Hey, wait a minute, I work long hours solo, are you suggesting...

Most of the artists I've known are less than zero when it comes to marketing.
That's why there are galleries.

I think the idea "we" accept art in out time might be a cosmopolitan concept.
At the edge of every cosmo universe is the great outlying hinterland that really defines the culture. Yea, NASCAR
post #73 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnapril
Art is the gap between the person and the object.
I don't have a counter argument because your statement doesn't really make sense.

If I try to understand it, I would say you are referring to the ability of an object to represent the process of the artist and convey it across a distance or gap.
Is that what you are saying?

A person of great artistic ability conveys more of the process than one of lesser ability?

I look at art as the final product of a process that probably is most evident in the photograph.

There is the image and there is the content of the image.

Most appreciate the image, I tend to like the content.
The artist conveys the content through the image.
Some are really great at this, but it is never more than a facsimile of the real thing.

The artist may be the only one who recieves the artistic experience.
What is left for the rest of us is a kind of after image that then gets traded and develops value, but it's real use is long over.
post #74 of 100
Many photographers utilize the conception of Johnapril's phrase to describe the aesthetic ethos of their work. When Garry Winogrand was asked what art was, he answered: “Art makes you question your conceptions. That's what puns do. You don't really laugh at a pun because anything's funny. You laugh because you realize you're not getting killed. Basically, a pun upsets you. Language is basic to your existence and a pun calls into question what you believe a word means and you laugh out of relief.” Heidegger also explores this topic with his dasein and his politic of the ding which Kant had also articulated.
post #75 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
Many photographers utilize the conception of Johnapril's phrase to describe the aesthetic ethos of their work.

When Garry Winogrand was asked what art was, he answered:

"Art makes you question your conceptions. That's what puns do. You don't really laugh at a pun because anything's funny. You laugh because you realize you're not getting killed. Basically, a pun upsets you. Language is basic to your existence and a pun calls into question what you believe a word means and you laugh out of relief."

Heidegger also explores this topic with his dasein and his politic of the ding which Kant had also articulated.

Are you saying Johnapril's statement is referring to art provoking a response that is universal? And that response is art?
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