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Replica modern art on the cheap - Page 4

post #46 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman

This is really fun!

Skalogre, do you really think Kandinsky is simple?
post #47 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by skalogre
Some dada art (especially Kandinsky) is rather simple.
Things that look simple are not necessarily things that are simple. Kandinsky was known for his analytical approach to generating paintings, but I don't think that necessarily makes them facile.
post #48 of 100
Fine, bad choice of words - I did not mean simplistic What I meant was less busy. I am trying to think of a good way to put it. And no, I meant some dada art is that way, ie using more basic geometric shapes and designs. SImplistic to me are, for example, those inane designs by that guy that sells his incredibly kitch designs of winter scenes and families and assorted rubbish on everything fronm canvas to tea towels to (probably) toilet paper. Thankfully maybe, his name escapes me at the moment.
post #49 of 100
Minimalistic.
post #50 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
Minimalistic.

Thank you, that is closer to what I meant. I need a thesaurus, lol.
post #51 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by skalogre
Thank you, that is closer to what I meant. I need a thesaurus, lol.
dude, you're greek. you're practically a walking thesaurus. (apologies if you're paraplegic.)
post #52 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by faustian bargain
dude, you're greek. you're practically a walking thesaurus.

(apologies if you're paraplegic.)

post #53 of 100
Years ago I met a Gentleman that everyone thought his art was the real thing. People would fawn over his "collection" but he would never say much. His circumstances indicated the art was real...he had a penthouse in NYC, villa in France, private island in warm waters. That was just some of the real estate.

It turned out that in Paris many of the art schools have students copy the works of the masters to learn techniques. He would just gather up the best of those copies from poor art students and hang them on his walls. No was the wiser. I only found out when I offered to buy a property from him and stated that I couldn't afford the artwork. He laughed telling me that he would throw it in and told me the truth.

I always found that amusing. He had such an air about his that no questioned him. It reminds me of an Aunt that I had that would pour cheap wine into a better labeled bottle. She saved the good stuff for herself and let the guests suffer.

Today when I see what is supposed to be a really great piece of art I wonder if it is the real thing or just a copy. I admit I don't know much about art. It does seem a little silly to have a piece of art worth $130+million that you put your elbow through.
post #54 of 100
The biggest misconception about the value of art is that people wrongfully assume that art gains value by the expression of it, the technical skill of it, etc. If such a thing was true, people such as Jackson Pollock, who was considered the greatest American painter during his time, would not have been dirt poor.
post #55 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian SD
The biggest misconception about the value of art is that people wrongfully assume that art gains value by the expression of it, the technical skill of it, etc.

If such a thing was true, people such as Jackson Pollock, who was considered the greatest American painter during his time, would not have been dirt poor.

Well said.
post #56 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by vc2000
Years ago I met a Gentleman that everyone thought his art was the real thing. People would fawn over his "collection" but he would never say much. His circumstances indicated the art was real...he had a penthouse in NYC, villa in France, private island in warm waters. That was just some of the real estate.

It turned out that in Paris many of the art schools have students copy the works of the masters to learn techniques. He would just gather up the best of those copies from poor art students and hang them on his walls. No was the wiser. I only found out when I offered to buy a property from him and stated that I couldn't afford the artwork. He laughed telling me that he would throw it in and told me the truth.

I always found that amusing. He had such an air about his that no questioned him. It reminds me of an Aunt that I had that would pour cheap wine into a better labeled bottle. She saved the good stuff for herself and let the guests suffer.

Today when I see what is supposed to be a really great piece of art I wonder if it is the real thing or just a copy. I admit I don't know much about art. It does seem a little silly to have a piece of art worth $130+million that you put your elbow through.


The $130 million pricetag is partly a result of wealthy buyers speculating on a potential return of investment. I think its widely assumed that the artists are making money on these transactions. Not quite true. If the artist is still living, high auction prices can affect higher gallery prices. But if the artist is dead- buyers /collectors buy and sell for profit much like securities trading, and the auction house gets a cut.
post #57 of 100
A rather enjoyable film I watched this weekend was Art School Confidential. deals with art school, surprisingly enough, and what goes on trying to get famous, get your work in galleries etc.
post #58 of 100
Disclaimer - Did not read the entire thread but ...

If you want a reproduction on canvas you are in luck. One word: giclee.
post #59 of 100
Thread Starter 
I spraypainted these and put them up in the garage.
post #60 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
That's rather missing the point of the art, isn't it?

Art is the gap between the person and the object.
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