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Wolverine 721LTD Shell Cordovan 1000 Mile Boot Review - Page 35

post #511 of 606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post


Bridle leather, Chromexcel, Predator and Cordovan are all vegetable tanned leather in whole or in part. Filson boot oil is specifically made for vegetable tanned leathers. There's nothing in it other than the oils and waxes that's used in the tanning process. If I didn't have a steady stream of Filson boot oil and snoseal I would be using Obenauf's products. LP was specifically invented to protect leather footwear in really nasty environments. Sound familiar? Obenauf says they made the oil to protect things like horse tack, saddles, boots and so on that are used in less harsh conditions. That should sound familiar as well. Many people have used Montana pitch blend but I'm not to sure about it. It has pine tar in it and it's my understanding that this component isn't all that good for leather. Same goes for Wolverine boot oil. It has the essential oils and waxes but there's pine tar in it. Other things to avoid is petroleum products and animal fats like real mink oil.
So for general care Filson boot oil or Obenauf's oil.
Gonna expose them to water, mud, muck, cow crap and so on you use Snoseal or LP in addition to boot oil.

Just bought the Filson Boot Oil and the Obenauf's LP. 

post #512 of 606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post

The wax is for retreating oil finished tin, cover and shelter cloth. It's not made to treat leather. You got the right stuff. Now get an old rag and literally soak it with boot oil and wipe the entire boot down with it. Apply it liberally and I do mean liberally as in wet. You'll be surprised how fast it absorbs into the leather. Let them sit for a day and wipe them down with a dry rag and you're done. The boots will be a tad darker and feel oily. That settles down in a week or so as the oil penetrates and you wear them. When they get scuffed all you need to do is rub the spot with your thumb and it should disappear. If not a dab of oil rubbed in will fix it. After a week or so of treating them with oil you can treat them with Snoseal for added protection. Wipe them down with a damp rag, brush them and then follow my Snoseal instructions that are posted in this thread. They'll be more or less bullet proof after that. Retreating is subjective. Over time you'll learn when they are dry or need to be treated with oil and or Snoseal. Now if you go hiking in knee deep water all day with them they need to dry for a couple of days and treated with boot oil inside and out. In general you do want to apply boot oil every once and a while to the smooth leather inside the boot. The reason should be obvious.

Just did it. I applied it very Liberally. It darkened it a ton, and I can tell it's going to look awesome. You were SO right about how much thicker Filson oil is. WOW. It is amazing. Go ahead and say I told you so, You've earned it for putting up with all my questions. 

post #513 of 606
Thread Starter 
Told ya so......
post #514 of 606
Thread Starter 
I don't think I've ever posted a pic of any of my boots when they were really filthy. Well here ya go. I went out with a buddy to Mark Twain Lake for a lil rock hunting. We went back to one of our honey hole mud flats to see if anything new popped out of the mud. The day before the lake was hit by storms that dumped about 1.6 inches of rain. We worked it over and another spot for about 5 hours. My buddy found a nice point and the best I could come up with was a broken Madison point and a few hammer stones. Not bad really since we did not wade like we usually do. It was cold out and the water isn't so warm these days.

Anyway, if you keep them maintained muck like this just sits one the surface and doesn't penetrate into the leather causing stains and all kinds of other problems. About all I need to do with them is knock off the clods and wipe them down with a wet sponge and they're ready for another day. BTW these are my world famous original brown 1Ks.....

8062985279_5e2f31c41d_z.jpg
Muddy Boots and a Point by DYSong Photography, on Flickr
post #515 of 606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post

I don't think I've ever posted a pic of any of my boots when they were really filthy. Well here ya go. I went out with a buddy to Mark Twain Lake for a lil rock hunting. We went back to one of our honey hole mud flats to see if anything new popped out of the mud. The day before the lake was hit by storms that dumped about 1.6 inches of rain. We worked it over and another spot for about 5 hours. My buddy found a nice point and the best I could come up with was a broken Madison point and a few hammer stones. Not bad really since we did not wade like we usually do. It was cold out and the water isn't so warm these days.
Anyway, if you keep them maintained muck like this just sits one the surface and doesn't penetrate into the leather causing stains and all kinds of other problems. About all I need to do with them is knock off the clods and wipe them down with a wet sponge and they're ready for another day. BTW these are my world famous original brown 1Ks.....
8062985279_5e2f31c41d_z.jpg
Muddy Boots and a Point by DYSong Photography, on Flickr

This is unreal!  Thanks for posting.  Makes the abuse mine see look downright amateur by comparison.

post #516 of 606
And here I felt like a badass stomping through a couple airports over the weekend...
post #517 of 606
Thread Starter 
That pic is a good representation of how any pair of my 1Ks look after a day in the field. If it was warm out I would have waded in the water to get the mud off. It's easier to let them dry and then condition them then it is to brush that nice Missouri clay off them. Once it's dry it's like concrete. Fun stuff.
post #518 of 606

Crane's, out of curiosity, how long do you expect that muddied up pair of 1000 mile boots--or any other that you own--to last before they need to be replaced? 

post #519 of 606
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bicktrav View Post

Crane's, out of curiosity, how long do you expect that muddied up pair of 1000 mile boots--or any other that you own--to last before they need to be replaced? 

Those boots in the pic are 3 years old. As long as the uppers don't split or I cut a hole in them on scree my guess would be 10 plus years.
Edited by Crane's - 10/11/12 at 10:11am
post #520 of 606

Cold ride into work this morning...

 

post #521 of 606

I recant all my criticisms of the 744. The more I look at it, the more I want it. Need to see a live action shot from someone, dammit.

post #522 of 606
Here's some live action shots.

05FC9205-21CC-428A-80D2-CC1F28B05B7F-3808-000001DCE2D7C56C.jpg

2A2948B0-7201-4466-8760-0C2634D46A9F-3808-000001DCCCCF3487.jpg
post #523 of 606

Thanks! Like the olive undertones in the second pic.

post #524 of 606

Not a top shot but ... 

 

 

post #525 of 606

Hey Crane,

Just an update. I got the filson boot oil last week and applied it. The boots are feeling great now that I've stopped caring so much for their safety. I've been wearing the shit out of them. I haven't had a chance to take them out on some of that Georgia red clay, but soon enough I'm going to. 

 

My sno seal is coming in today, when I apply it, and for that matter all boot oils and stuff, should I keep the shoe tree in them? Should i let them dry with trees in them?

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