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Wolverine 721LTD Shell Cordovan 1000 Mile Boot Review - Page 3

post #31 of 614
Call me crazy but I would never put snoseal or polish on shell cordovan.
post #32 of 614
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by xchen View Post
Call me crazy but I would never put snoseal or polish on shell cordovan.

Nah I wouldn't necessarily say that. I highly doubt you would wear any of your shell cordovan footwear in the places these boots of mine will end up going through. There is a huge difference between sidewalks and an office environment compared to a muddy shit infested cattle pasture or a scree covered hillside. In my OP I made it clear what environments these boots would have to survive. Regular boot oil and snoseal treatments of any footwear in these environments is pretty much required maintenance if you want them to last at all and look good too.
post #33 of 614
Thread Starter 
It's been a week since I got these and they've been worn 5 out 7 days. I'll wear them again today when I make my way to the store.

For the most part I haven't done anything "special" to them other than yesterday afternoon. Yesterday I trenched a 400 foot run for a water line with the Ditch Witch. There aint nothing like wet Missouri clay. The crap can clog anything up and it sticks to everything like glue. When it dries it's like concrete. When it was all said and done a stick, a wet sponge and a brush and my boots look good as new.
post #34 of 614
Just makes me want a pair even more!
post #35 of 614
These boots are awesome and are now available in the UK from December!!

Should complement my Original's in Rust!!

post #36 of 614
Quote:
Originally Posted by xchen View Post
Call me crazy but I would never put snoseal or polish on shell cordovan.

+1. I thought (by conventional SF thinking) that you should not put anything on cordovan. I see you are applying it on the welt. Does the cordovan absorb any snoseal? Or are you simply rubbing it off when you brush/buff it?
post #37 of 614
Quote:
Originally Posted by xchen View Post
I'm not digging that short-wing cap on the toe at all, and from the pics some of the stitching looked all over the place.
+1. Ruins the boot for me completely.
post #38 of 614
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Omega Man View Post
+1. I thought (by conventional SF thinking) that you should not put anything on cordovan. I see you are applying it on the welt. Does the cordovan absorb any snoseal? Or are you simply rubbing it off when you brush/buff it?

Yes it absorbed quite a bit of it. Shell Cordovan by it's very nature requires very little care. It's a very tough, tight grained, water resistant leather however it is still a vegetable tanned leather. All those oils and waxes over time will deteriorate and they have to be replaced. Way way way too many people are under the assumption that low maintenance means no maintenance. Dry cracked leather or dry rotted leather is the result of not replenishing these necessary oils and waxes.
post #39 of 614
beautiful boots.
post #40 of 614
Nice looking boot... ...but a field boot without a lug sole seems illogical and impractical. Ice, snow, mud, cow pies are all pretty slick with a leather sole. Anyways- enjoy and keep the pics coming.
post #41 of 614
so wait, you are using these for farm and field work with that sole... really?

i mean, don't get me wrong they are nice boots, not at all my style, but really nice. i just think that sole is going to prove to be a major hinderance to the environs you are using these in.
post #42 of 614
^my thoughts exactly. but props to you for not babying shoes!
post #43 of 614
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by eightdouble View Post
so wait, you are using these for farm and field work with that sole... really? i mean, don't get me wrong they are nice boots, not at all my style, but really nice. i just think that sole is going to prove to be a major hinderance to the environs you are using these in.
Yes I am. This is a continuation of a test that started with a pair of original 1K boots. You can read it here. In that thread I stated that I did not think the sole would survive. That assumption was proved wrong after nearly a year of abuse. Even though the soles are smooth slipping has not been a problem either. The mud around here is hard clay and it gets a layer of peanut butter slop over it. My lugged boots slip just as bad as the 1Ks. The 1Ks don't hold as much mud so I don't have to put up with Frankenstein Boot Syndrome. Snow? We get it but it tends to turn to mirrored ice around here in a day or so. Nothing short of crampons or spikes keep you from busting your ass then. On the rare occasion I actually get to play in snow around here side stepping, heel digs and toe jamming work just fine. Granted, if I was going to actually climb or hike a serious grade I do have boots specifically for that task. All in all these boots are being tested day to day doing what I normally do which is very similar to what someone in 1914 might have done. If they survive what I put them through then all you city fellas aint got nothing to worry about if you get a pair of these. You won't hurt them and there is no need to baby them at all. And tomorrow is opening day of deer season. It's pouring right now so it's going to be wet in the AM. The 721 LTDs are going hunting in the morning.
post #44 of 614
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post
Yes I am. This is a continuation of a test that started with a pair of original 1K boots. You can read it here. In that thread I stated that I did not think the sole would survive. That assumption was proved wrong after nearly a year of abuse. Even though the soles are smooth slipping has not been a problem either. The mud around here is hard clay and it gets a layer of peanut butter slop over it. My lugged boots slip just as bad as the 1Ks. The 1Ks don't hold as much mud so I don't have to put up with Frankenstein Boot Syndrome. Snow? We get it but it tends to turn to mirrored ice around here in a day or so. Nothing short of crampons or spikes keep you from busting your ass then. On the rare occasion I actually get to play in snow around here side stepping, heel digs and toe jamming work just fine. Granted, if I was going to actually climb or hike a serious grade I do have boots specifically for that task. All in all these boots are being tested day to day doing what I normally do which is very similar to what someone in 1914 might have done.

If they survive what I put them through then all you city fellas aint got nothing to worry about if you get a pair of these. You won't hurt them and there is no need to baby them at all.

And tomorrow is opening day of deer season. It's pouring right now so it's going to be wet in the AM. The 721 LTDs are going hunting in the morning.

Good on ya, mate! Hope you get your buck. I'd be wearing something with a tread...but that's me and not you.

Re city slickers: Bet you've never been in the old 96th Street subway station 2 days after a heavy snow...your Missouri mud ain't got nothing on that mung! Think dog poop/hobo vomit/decomposing newspaper/gum/soot/rat carcass...
post #45 of 614
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1 View Post
Good on ya, mate! Hope you get your buck. I'd be wearing something with a tread...but that's me and not you.

Re city slickers: Bet you've never been in the old 96th Street subway station 2 days after a heavy snow...your Missouri mud ain't got nothing on that mung! Think dog poop/hobo vomit/decomposing newspaper/gum/soot/rat carcass...

What city? I lived most of my life in Chicago. I've seen that interesting bio hazard goo you're talking about around there. My generic name for that stuff is cesspool muck. Pretty nasty stuff.
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