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Shoes in ny - Page 2

post #16 of 31
Now, now, boys, play nice. I don't understand jcusey's comments about the measuring technique being irrelevant. I've never had a pair of shoes custom-made - my tastes run more towards the new Nike Lazers (oh, how I want to get my hands on a pair.) than to John Lobb, although I wouldn't say no to a pair - but it seems to me that it would be hard to make a pair of shoes that fit perfectly if the measurements are done incorrectly. Maybe you guys are irritable today because your EG's are pinching your feet I invite you all to ditch the suits and ties and custom made shoes, throw on your favorite pair of jeans and Pumas, and come join me for a beer or five - in the middle of the workday. All you corporate types, eat your heart out.
post #17 of 31
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Excuse me, but John Lobb's ready made shoes are grossly over-priced.  Call it the "Hermes effect." $800--$1,000+ for shoes churned out in a factory in Northampton are a r-i-p  o-f-f.  JM Weston is a much, much better value.  
Shoes made in a factory in Northampton are a ripoff but shoes made in a factory in Limoges aren't? Please. JM Weston's price point, especially for lace-ups, isn't much lower than Lobb's. They're good shoes, but the design aesthetic is considerably clunkier than that for Lobb (and EG, for that matter). There's nothing wrong with that, but you're comparing apples and oranges. Your disparagement of Northampton shoe factories (which would include Edward Green, too, you know) notwithstanding, Lobb shoes certainly are not "average" in any universe that I know of and represent just about the pinnacle of machine-made ready-made shoes (and there are some others, including EG, in the same class). With the exception of Vass shoes purchased in Hungary, you're going to have to spend considerably more to get a real hand-made shoe.
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And, how absurd of you to state that the measuring technique, or lack thereof, at Jay Kos is irrelevant.  Puh-lease.  When I spend several hundred dollars for a pair of shoes that will last many years, you bet I want to be fitted by an expert.  Now, go play in the traffic.
Only if you'll join me.   The Brannock device is useful in determining a starting point for size, but that's it. Different lasts and different makers fit differently in different sizes. Just because a Brannock device says that I'm a 10D doesn't mean that a 10D in a particular shoe is the best fit for me. If a 9.5E fits the best, I'm going to buy the 9.5E regardless of what the tool says my size is. And if I'm going to drop several hundred dollars on a pair of shoes, I'm going to know enough about how shoes should fit to tell the salesman whether they fit and not vice versa.
post #18 of 31
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I don't understand jcusey's comments about the measuring technique being irrelevant.  I've never had a pair of shoes custom-made - my tastes run more towards the new Nike Lazers (oh, how I want to get my hands on a pair.) than to John Lobb, although I wouldn't say no to a pair - but it seems to me that it would be hard to make a pair of shoes that fit perfectly if the measurements are done incorrectly.  
The point that I'm trying to make is that measuring devices measure in two dimensions, one measurement per dimension. Your feet are three dimensional objects. There's no way to know whether a particular pair of shoes is going to fit unless you try them on. Since different makes fit differently in different sizes, your measured size is at best only a starting point. Furthermore, you will never escape ill-fitting shoes unless you learn what to look for yourself instead of relying on the salesman.
post #19 of 31
There is one shoe shop in New York nobody has mentioned: Belgian loafers. I have never seen a pair in the flesh, but I rather like the idea of having just one model in a variety of leathers/fabrics. In these days when so much is about new designs and a different look each season, it makes a refreshing change. Has anyone ever worn Belgian loafers or are they considered to be hopelessly fuddy-duddy-ish?
post #20 of 31
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Has anyone ever worn Belgian loafers or are they considered to be hopelessly fuddy-duddy-ish?
I guess that depends on one's definition of fuddy-duddy-ish. To those that know them in New York, I would suspect they are considered either outrageously preppy (I trust you are familiar with the American concept of preppy) or rather effeminate. I more often see them on women, who naturally can get away with more than men. When I see them on men, I tend to see them on older men who look as if they live on the Upper East Side. Occasionally I see them on men whom I would suspect are gay (or both). The last reference I saw of them was something along the lines of Issac Mizrahi saying they were the only shoes he wore or some such. (In case Issac Mizrahi doesn't translate to the UK, he's a gay fashion designer who lost his backing, became a talk show figure and now designs for the masses who shop at Target.) Actually I have always liked the styling, but then I came of age during the uber-preppy 1980s. I find them to be uncomfortable, however. A few years ago Testoni did an opera pomp based on their design that was more comfortable and I bought a pair. I think their market niche is pretty small and largely inhabited by Tod's driving mocs. But I appreciate that they're there. If I didn't walk very much, I'd love to snag a pair just for fun.
post #21 of 31
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This season's Peal shoes are of similar quality, but the interior markings and other manufacturing details lead me to believe that someone else is making them now.
Alfred Sargent if I'm not mistaken - equivalent to Sargent's Premier Collection. Check out the Hadleigh - Brooks is carrying a shoe that looks to be identical. I think the quality is consistent as well. Interestingly, my first impression of the new Peals is that they are a bit nicer than the Crockett & Jones "Hand Grade" shoes. That's even more interesting considering that the Sargent "Premier" shoes only cost about $215 including shipping from England.. Better yet, Alfred Sargent top line of shoes - the Premier Exclusive Range are even nicer. They are whole-cut, have oak-bark tanned soles with a "half black" finish, and have a nicer lining with the little "size oval" like Edward Green. Cost - about $275 including shipping.. I've been meaning to give the "Premier Exclusive" shoes a try but keep pushing it off to next month. Anyone care to beat me to it and report back here??
post #22 of 31
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Actually I have always liked the styling, but then I came of age during the uber-preppy 1980s.  I find them to be uncomfortable, however.  A few years ago Testoni did an opera pomp based on their design that was more comfortable and I bought a pair.  I think their market niche is pretty small and largely inhabited by Tod's driving mocs.  But I appreciate that they're there.  If I didn't walk very much, I'd love to snag a pair just for fun.
I think that Testoni still makes a knock-off. I've seen a Testoni shoe in recent Maus and Hoffman catalogues that is very similar to Belgian shoes. I like the styling, too. I think that a Belgian shoe in black velvet or faux leopard would make a great tuxedo shoe.
post #23 of 31
I've only ever seen the Alfred Sargent Exclusive Premier Collection in a shoe store just opposite the Royal Society of Medicine. They look nice, though I don't think that they are quite as well made as C & J's handgrade line. Sargent also makes shoes for Tim Little - I have a pair of wholecut "Red House" shoes from the latter and they're very nice indeed.
post #24 of 31
My interest was piqued by the "uber-preppy" mentioned in conjunction with the Belgian loafer. I can't seem to find a picture of them on the Internet though. Could someone provide a link? Thanks, Ryan
post #25 of 31
Belgian shoes The Belgian shoes are reputed to be extremely comfortable, although definitely a rather ideosyncratic style.  The company was founded by the Henri Bendel, and apparently the shoes became a fashion staple of the Upper East Side crowd in the 70's.  The shoes are only sold at the company's own store in NYC.  My understanding is that they are handmade, although what exactly this means is unclear to me. The following is from a New York Times web story: The Traditionalist's Hit Parade By GINIA BELLAFANTE A man who outfits himself at J. Press might well have a pair of Belgian shoes in his closet, or if not, he'd be looking for a woman who did. Unlike, say, duck ties, Belgian shoes are an essential part of the prep wardrobe, carrying an image more genuinely exclusive than goofy. Part of the reason is that the fashion world embraced them in the 1970's, and part of it is that they can be found in only one spot, Belgian Shoes, on East 55th Street. The store was opened in 1956 by Henri Bendel, originally one block away. It still maintains the genteel hours of 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and started opening on Saturdays only last year. The store has had the same manager for 44 years, Margaret Cardone, a native of Queens, who will tell you first and foremost that the Belgian shoe, a piped, bowed, slip-on affair, "is not a loafer." Like other elements of the prep iconography, Belgian shoes, brought to this country from Belgium in 1955, were intended for times spent swirling swizzle sticks in Palm Beach and on Harbour Island. Like many of their wearers, Belgian shoes aren't meant to do much at all. "You have to remember, the people who wore these didn't go to work," Ms. Cardone said, standing in front of a shelf full of shoes in pastels and bright yellow with contrasting piping. "This is not a shoe to be worn all day." for a pic of bright green Belgian's, see the article here: NYTimes article Also, a rather amusing article: Belgian shoes article
post #26 of 31
Oh yeah, for what it's worth, Stuart Weitzman has in their current line a knock-off of the Belgians. I know because a friend of mine was wearing them yesterday, and I asked her if they were Belgians; she told me they are Weitzmans.
post #27 of 31
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Interestingly, my first impression of the new Peals is that they are a bit nicer than the Crockett & Jones "Hand Grade" shoes. That's even more interesting considering that the Sargent "Premier" shoes only cost about $215 including shipping from England..
You know, even though the C&J Peal shoes were cut using Handgrade patterns and had such Handgrade features as channelled soles, I never thought that they were quite the same level of quality as Handgrade shoes. They were made on different lasts, they didn't have a full sock liner, and it didn't look to me that the leather was quite the same level of quality as on Handgrade. Still, they were a pretty good deal given what quality English shoes usually bring in the US. I haven't tried the new Peals on yet, but the quality looks to be pretty impressive. Of course, since I can get identical shoes from Britain for 30% less, I'll probably do that if I decide that I just have to try AS shoes (which seems likely).
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I've been meaning to give the "Premier Exclusive" shoes a try but keep pushing it off to next month. Anyone care to beat me to it and report back here??
You're a bad influence. First you offer those Vass shoes at ridiculously low prices, now you try to get others to market test AS shoes for you   .
post #28 of 31
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You're a bad influence. First you offer those Vass shoes at ridiculously low prices, now you try to get others to market test AS shoes for you
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You know, even though the C&J Peal shoes were cut using Handgrade patterns and had such Handgrade features as channelled soles, I never thought that they were quite the same level of quality as Handgrade shoes. They were made on different lasts, they didn't have a full sock liner, and it didn't look to me that the leather was quite the same level of quality as on Handgrade. Still, they were a pretty good deal given what quality English shoes usually bring in the US.
It's funny you should mention that because I was questioning my memory on the same matter. Some of the Peal shoes seemed to be C&J Handgrade but didn't seem quite as nice as the other Handgrade shoes I've seen. I wonder if the same goes for the Polo shoes?? I've seen them all on seperate occasions but never together so that I could make a proper comparison.
post #29 of 31
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I wonder if the same goes for the Polo shoes??
Here recently, all the Polo shoes that I've seen have been Italian-made and thoroughly forgettable. The C&J-made Polo shoes that I've seen have all been comparable to C&J's regular line (soles stitched aloft, etc.). That's not to say that there weren't or aren't C&J-made Polo shoes that are closer to Handgrade quality, just that they haven't made it to Houston.
post #30 of 31
I'm a little late to this thread. I don't think anyone has mentioned A. Testoni shoes. They have their own store on 5th Avenue and their shoes are also sold at Barneys.
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