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post #46 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabienne
I have noticed differences with my son as well. For example, he uses his hands more while speaking in French, he indicates "two" with his thumb and index finger in French, with his index and middle finger in English, his facial expressions are more "lively" in French than in English.

Yes, exactly! It's fascinating, isn't it.
post #47 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabienne
Thank you for taking the time to explain. I will look into the curriculum (they now post it online for the school). I would think it would have to follow the same basic path, though, no matter what country.

I did a quick check and the organization that runs the IB program also has a very comprehensive website. I'd suggest checking it out as there are IB programs for every age group. And don't rule out privates, even boarding school, as a lot of them give a ton of financial aid. If you've got a smart kid I'm sure you can find a school that would make it work. In my last year of high school I got free residence b/c my physics teacher thought I was brilliant and would do better if extricated from my home environment :P

The best thing about private schools is the quality of teacher they attract. For an intelligent kid, good teachers are an incredible boon. I still drop in and visit mine every couple of years. I don't know if you're set on keeping your child at the same school forever, but my advice is to try and talk to other parents at any school you're considering. Don't choose a school solely on academic reputation. Some of them make their students miserable while others provide an incredible overall experience. The parents will know better than the teachers imo.
post #48 of 103
Fabienne, you are definitly doing the right thing. Your child will have a big advantage over his peers by speaking three or four languages. How I wish I was given this opportunity! Learning another language seems rather long and excruciating at this point.

I would consider myself bilingual, or at least very close to it. My first language is French and I have been forced to go to french schools all of my life. Not that my parents or I wouldn't have liked me to go to english schools, its just that, in Québec, a kid from French parents legally can not attend an English school. This is totally ridiculous as it is a total nuisance to francophones. I, for one, had to pick up my English on my own because, let's face it, the English classes I was given were atrocious at best. This is why I am still stuck with difficulties interacting orally with people in English. I will consider switching to McGill for my final year of studies if I get an internship in a Montréal firm (i.e.: more money).

Now that I think of it, my facial expressions as well as gesticulations aren't the same when I speak in French or English. This is really odd. I think that I come across as more 'agressive' in English. I had never realized this.
post #49 of 103
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Histrion
Not that my parents or I wouldn't have liked me to go to english schools, its just that, in Québec, a kid from French parents legally can not attend an English school. This is totally ridiculous as it is a total nuisance to francophones.

Is that a measure to preserve the French language in Canada? What percentage of francophone parents would choose to send their kids to English-speaking schools, do you think?
post #50 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabienne
Is that a measure to preserve the French language in Canada? What percentage of francophone parents would choose to send their kids to English-speaking schools, do you think?

Yes it is (well to preserve it in quebec), and probably not many.

It's a completely stupid law. When we moved from ontario to quebec, had I not already been quite fluent and had my parents not had the money to send me to an english private school, it would have completely ruined my academic career.

I remember a big fuss a few years ago about a hockey player from the states who moved his family here when he got traded was told that his kid had to go to a french school despite the fact that he didn't speak a word of french. I can't remember what happened, but that's how inane the law is.
post #51 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabienne
Is that a measure to preserve the French language in Canada? What percentage of francophone parents would choose to send their kids to English-speaking schools, do you think?
It is a measure with such aim. As for the percentage, I would say that it wouldn't actually be that high. There some resentment for the English language in Québec, especially in rural Québec. I would say that a majority of their parents currently sending their kids to private schools (as mine did) would do it, another part of them wouldn't because of 'french patriotism', if I may use these terms. Perhaps a tiny part of parents sending their kids to public schools would opt for the English ones if they had this opportunity. I am not talking about public English schools, which are almost non-existent outside of Montréal and some part of the Eastern Townships (I lived in the Townships and the closest english highschool is still a good car ride away). I think that speaking a beautiful French instead of this weird dialect would actually serve French's cause a lot better than this prohibition. In fact, I see this as a nuisance to me as an individual. I could care less about this patriotism: if I am to move away from Québec, which I seriously consider doing, I will still make sure that my kids are speaking French, and at very high standards. I don't need laws to maintain my pride. In fact, I think it's pretty humiliating to have laws to protect ourselves from assimilation. It's not like we are protecting us from an invader; we're protecting us from ourselves. This is pretty damn silly. Oh well, I don't want to hi-jack this very interesting thread...
post #52 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek
Yes it is (well to preserve it in quebec), and probably not many.

It's a completely stupid law. When we moved from ontario to quebec, had I not already been quite fluent and had my parents not had the money to send me to an english private school, it would have completely ruined my academic career.

I remember a big fuss a few years ago about a hockey player from the states who moved his family here when he got traded was told that his kid had to go to a french school despite the fact that he didn't speak a word of french. I can't remember what happened, but that's how inane the law is.

Yeah. You also had the luck that one of your parents, who was originally from Canada, spoke English. That's what allowed you to go to an English school, ultimately. If I stay in Québec for all of my life, I guess I'll have to marry an anglophone.
post #53 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Histrion
It is a measure with such aim. As for the percentage, I would say that it wouldn't actually be that high. There some resentment for the English language in Québec, especially in rural Québec. I would say that a majority of their parents currently sending their kids to private schools (as mine did) would do it, another part of them wouldn't because of 'french patriotism', if I may use these terms. Perhaps a tiny part of parents sending their kids to public schools would opt for the English ones if they had this opportunity.

I am not talking about public English schools, which are almost non-existent outside of Montréal and some part of the Eastern Townships (I lived in the Townships and the closest english highschool is still a good car ride away).

I think that speaking a beautiful French instead of this weird dialect would actually serve French's cause a lot better than this prohibition. In fact, I see this as a nuisance to me as an individual. I could care less about this patriotism: if I am to move away from Québec, which I seriously consider doing, I will still make sure that my kids are speaking French, and at very high standards. I don't need laws to maintain my pride. In fact, I think it's pretty humiliating to have laws to protect ourselves from assimilation. It's not like we are protecting us from an invader; we're protecting us from ourselves. This is pretty damn silly.

Oh well, I didn't want to hi-jack this very interesting thread...

I've always thought of it as intellectual inbreeding. When I first went to university in ontario, I couldn't get loans because i was leaving the province when I guess they thought I shouldn't. So i couldn't get money from the feds and couldn't get it from quebec. That's since changed, but there's plenty of retarded laws still in place.

And ya, let's not hi-jack the thread. :P
post #54 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Histrion
Yeah. You also had the luck that one of your parents, who was originally from Canada, spoke English. That's what allowed you to go to an English school, ultimately. If I stay in Québec for all of my life, I guess I'll have to marry an anglophone.

No, it was only because my school was private and unsubsidized by the quebec govt. that i was allowed to go to. If it had been public or semi-private, I would have been forced in to a french school like my brother was because my mother had 50% of her primary and secondary education in french. The fact that my father was british was irrelevant.
post #55 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek
No, it was only because my school was private and unsubsidized by the quebec govt. that i was allowed to go to. If it had been public or semi-private, I would have been forced in to a french school like my brother was because my mother had 50% of her primary and secondary education in french. The fact that my father was british was irrelevant.

In fact, your father being British is relevent, but not in the way you'd think. It is the reason for which you weren't eligible: one of your parents must've received his English education in Canada in order for his children to be eligible. Oh well.
post #56 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabienne
Is that a measure to preserve the French language in Canada? What percentage of francophone parents would choose to send their kids to English-speaking schools, do you think?

The law was not created for francophones but aimed at the large numbers of immigrants who preferred to send their kids to school in English rather than French in the 60s and 70s. Only a tiny minority of francophones would consider sending their kids to English school.

While I am hardly a fan of Quebec language laws, in that respect, it was an appropriate piece of legislation so that new immigrants could be better integrated into French Canadian society rather than continue to be ghettoized in ethnic enclaves where their lack of French represented an impediment to their upward mobility. From that perspective, it has been very successful in achieving its objectives. Just like most laws nonetheless, it's not perfect and will have unintended consequences. I am not familiar with the hockey player case mentioned but the law applies to children of immigrants who were NOT schooled in English so if he was Canadian he would be exempt. Perhaps he was Russian or something.

The thing to remember is until the 1980s in many cases, school boards were divided along religious, rather than linguistic differences. The Catholic schools were French and the Protestant ones English.
post #57 of 103
Thread Starter 
No, no, keep highjacking: this is fascinating, to me, at least. And it does relate to the subject.
post #58 of 103
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Histrion

I think that speaking a beautiful French instead of this weird dialect

Can you elaborate? Do you mean French spoken in rural areas when you talk of "weird dialect"?
post #59 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabienne
Can you elaborate? Do you mean French spoken in rural areas when you talk of "weird dialect"?

I suspect histrion is referring to Quebecois French with its particular accent, intonation, expressions...that can be very pronounced in certain rural areas but no less present in Montreal or Quebec City. No worse than Belgian, Breton, Marseillais... or any number of "weird" French accents. I find it quite colourful in fact and there are certain expressions I love to use even though I don't speak that way - unless I am talking to a Quebecois whereupon I'll adopt the dialect somewhat, which used to annoy my wife to no end.
post #60 of 103
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by EL72
I suspect histrion is referring to Quebecois French with its particular accent, intonation, expressions...that can be very pronounced in certain rural areas but no less present in Montreal or Quebec City. No worse than Belgian, Breton, Marseillais... or any number of "weird" French accents. I find it quite colourful in fact and there are certain expressions I love to use even though I don't speak that way - unless I am talking to a Quebecois whereupon I'll adopt the dialect somewhat, which used to annoy my wife to no end.

I feel the same, I have a particular fondness for Quebecois French, of all the ways French is spoken throughout the world. Of course, there are varying levels, which also depend on social background, I assume. I remember once getting lost in Quebec and asking for directions in a 4 house village. They understood me, but I was mortified that I couldn't understand them, so I pretended I had and got back in my car so as not to offend them...

My accent (typical Parisian) feels flat and boring, compared to theirs.
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