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The fine line between dressing like an old man and a sharp GQ/Esquire guy. - Page 30

post #436 of 519
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
During the heyday of the Tina Fey parody, I had to wear an adult diaper.

True story.


- B

Whatever helps you keep clean lines.
post #437 of 519
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
Yes to both, and they were cut for braces.

I hope you also warned those nearby to brace themselves.
post #438 of 519
Quote:
Originally Posted by pocketsquareguy View Post
The classic "Old Man" look is when the fit is no longer current. If you want to look younger focus on the fit. Most of the younger guys on SF that look older usually have loose pants, too long an inseam, loose jackets, etc. Older guys who look younger typically nail the current fit and infuse their look with new fashion elements such as an updated color on the socks, PS, tie.

You're going to have to explain to me how socks can have an "updated color." Who "updated" it? Is light in the neighborhood of 700 nm stylish and modern, but 580 nm is dated and old-mannish?
post #439 of 519
Quote:
Originally Posted by acecow View Post
A little higher......


A new local maxima for the thread!
post #440 of 519
I'm curious, what exactly does dressing like an "old man" mean? Looking around this place, people like olddog/oldtrix look like "old men", and they are the best dressed here, both well dressed, and with a personal sense of style second to none, while the young kids look tired, predictable, and boring. The kindest thing you can say about them is they do not look pathetic.
post #441 of 519
post #442 of 519
^^ Is that OP behind the rubbish cans?




- B
post #443 of 519
Quote:
Originally Posted by Archivist View Post
while the young kids look tired, predicable and boring. The kindest thing you can say about them is they do not look pathetic.

Thank you. Mission accomplished.
post #444 of 519
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
^^ Is that OP behind the rubbish cans?




- B

I don't know why that made me laugh so hard.
post #445 of 519
Quote:
Originally Posted by lastlight View Post
I don't know why that made me laugh so hard.
It made me a emit a sort of squak and then a few giglettes.
post #446 of 519
pocketsquare guy is right

joining late, but this is a problem i have had to skirt around too. it's almost entirely about fit and cut. old men wear loose comfortable clothing, so that appearance is verboten. beware those awful in-house department store jackets and shoes (Marks & Spencer etc) - the cut is all wrong, impossible to look good in that stuff. avoid jackets which are too long, low button stance, or with closed quarters - classic old man. avoid shoes with short vamps - classic old man. avoid high waisted pants - classic old man (you want lower rise, with slim leg, to keep the crotch fairly high, and lengthen the leg).

i think the style is far less important - outmoded fashions like wider lapels or lower gorge can still look great if the fit and cut is sleek. pagoda shoulderline is a bit hard to work with though.

combinations is the other thing - what goes with what. if in doubt, don't overdo the number of potentially old man elements you have in one outfit: brogues, slacks, sports jacket could put you in the old zone, but substituting slim jeans will help, or wearing the elements in a different way. some will hate me saying it, but mixing it up / adding edge is a differentiator. also you need to be confident in your own style, find an angle, and not look like you raided grandpa's closet.

when you look like your clothes / style is what you wear all the time, then it will be right. if you look like you dressed up, then it's all wrong.
post #447 of 519
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
^^ Is that OP behind the rubbish cans?




- B

post #448 of 519
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gutman View Post
pocketsquare guy is right joining late, but this is a problem i have had to skirt around too. it's almost entirely about fit and cut. old men wear loose comfortable clothing, so that appearance is verboten. beware those awful in-house department store jackets and shoes (Marks & Spencer etc) - the cut is all wrong, impossible to look good in that stuff. avoid jackets which are too long, low button stance, or with closed quarters - classic old man. avoid shoes with short vamps - classic old man. avoid high waisted pants - classic old man (you want lower rise, with slim leg, to keep the crotch fairly high, and lengthen the leg). i think the style is far less important - outmoded fashions like wider lapels or lower gorge can still look great if the fit and cut is sleek. pagoda shoulderline is a bit hard to work with though. combinations is the other thing - what goes with what. if in doubt, don't overdo the number of potentially old man elements you have in one outfit: brogues, slacks, sports jacket could put you in the old zone, but substituting slim jeans will help, or wearing the elements in a different way. some will hate me saying it, but mixing it up / adding edge is a differentiator. also you need to be confident in your own style, find an angle, and not look like you raided grandpa's closet. when you look like your clothes / style is what you wear all the time, then it will be right. if you look like you dressed up, then it's all wrong.
Actually, you start to shrink after a certain age. That's why old people's clothes are baggy -- unless they shop for new ones, which they never seem to do.
post #449 of 519
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
^^ Is that OP behind the rubbish cans?




- B

I now see why you're so popular around here.
post #450 of 519
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
^^ Is that OP behind the rubbish cans?




- B

I almost cried.
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