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The fine line between dressing like an old man and a sharp GQ/Esquire guy. - Page 16

post #226 of 519
Quote:
Originally Posted by detroiter View Post
SPORT COATS ARE CORNY.

Well, to quote Artur Boruc:

"THE CORN-POCALYPSE IS UPON US!!!!!!!! AHHHHHHHHH THE KERNELED MENACE WILL SOON COB US ALL!!!!!!!!"
post #227 of 519
Never heard of it.
post #228 of 519
Quote:
Originally Posted by detroiter View Post
None of those people live in Detroit, nor have they ever lived in detroit. They all from past 8 mile, though i dont know who the last people are.

He is from Detroit.


I like his earrings, Harry Winston?
post #229 of 519
I believe Jacob the Jeweler of Jacob & Co. because that was the guy Jacob was accused (and went to federal prison) of laundering $125 million dollars for. So I would assume it would only be right to wear his jewelry, wouldnt you think?
post #230 of 519
That's small time. My New York neighbor was accused and went to federal prison for laundering $65 Billion.

post #231 of 519
Quote:
Originally Posted by detroiter View Post
ZING!!!

As I said sport coats are corny as fuck. You must understand, as I stated before, most people on this forum overcompensate with ridiculously expensive clothing, because, THEY ARE CORNBALLS. Most people are nerds on here, and really anyone who follows the advice given on MC is setting themselves up not to be james bond, but to be some guy who every girl thinks is a fag. Most are not manly men, and most aren't getting any type of hot girl. The man makes the clothes, remember that, carry yourself with a swag, and what you wear wont matter.

I love the fact that I called sport coats corny and the girl you asked said the guys in that picture look like fags, of course they do, they are wearing sport coats.

Then why do you continue to post on MC?

Please stop as you have no idea how dumb your posts sound.
post #232 of 519
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post
That's small time. My New York neighbor was accused and went to federal prison for laundering $65 Billion.


No he didn't. He did not launder $65 billion nor was he accused of laundering $65 billion. so what anyway my father went to college with him.
post #233 of 519
Quote:
Originally Posted by detroiter View Post
ZING!!!

As I said sport coats are corny as fuck.

i find that a sprinkle of corn in my shrimp etouffee is incredibly delicious.
post #234 of 519
Quote:
Originally Posted by bleachboy View Post
If you want to make it yourself, the recipe is below. I'm lazy, so I just use Emeril's Essence, which is available at every grocery store, and essentially the same as this.


Creole seasoning

If you have different types of paprika, feel free to mix them together to make the 1½ tablespoons. I like to use Spanish smoked paprika, Hungarian sweet paprika, and Hungarian half-sharp paprika in equal measures.

This version of Creole seasoning is from Mr. B's Bistro in New Orleans.

1½ tablespoons paprika
¾ tablespoon ground black pepper
½ tablespoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried basil
1 teaspoon onion powder
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper

Combine all ingredients and store in an airtight container.

Thx. Will try this weekend.
post #235 of 519
Quote:
Originally Posted by detroiter View Post
None of those people live in Detroit, nor have they ever lived in detroit. They all from past 8 mile, though i dont know who the last people are.

Actually Jack White (3rd pictured) was born and lived in Detroit city proper. Eminem and Kid Rock, notsomuch.

This guy was born in Detroit too.


Ohmygosh and he's wearing a sportcoat!
post #236 of 519
And he looks damn corny if you ask me. Dunno wtf jack white is.
post #237 of 519
Quote:
Originally Posted by MBreinin View Post
Just use cayenne, black pepper, a little bit of salt and some garlic/onion powder. Do not season heavily as these dishes need to cook. I do most of my seasoning near the end. Don't forget that salty and spicy meats like Tasso, Andouille sausage and others add heat and salt to the dish. Also, a couple cans of Rotel tomatoes with diced Chilis is a nice addition to Cajun/Creole dishes. The key to making any Cajun dish, in my experience, is to cook it all day. I can't stand "hurry up" Gumbos and the such, as they are thin and bland. I cook Gumbo for no less than 6-8 hours. It is thick and complex. Mike
Interesting info there MBreinin. I tasted gumbo for the first time down in Atlanta, some 5 years ago now. Gumbo (complex variety) has yet to be understood in the United Kingdom. Lear
post #238 of 519
Fifi's Chicken and Sausage Gumbo

This is a very basic gumbo that I learned many years ago from a dear lady in LaPlace, Louisiana. She was quite an authority on gumbo and its many styles. She and her far-flung Louisiana family put a lot of energy into "discussion" of one style versus another. This dark and sultry style is a favorite for poultry and sausage of whatever type. We made up the term "South of I-10 Style" because she claims it is more prevalent the further south you go. Turkey is often the bird in question after Thanksgiving. Duck often shows up after a successful hunt. It is not a thick gumbo, due to the very dark roux losing some thickening power in the process, and the vegetables just about disappear. File is often offered at the table for addition to the diner's liking. The recipe is a good starting point. Endless variations are possible. I have included some techniques that might help achieve that dark roux.


1 cup vegetable oil (or other fat such as butter, bacon, duck, etc)
1 cup flour (bleached or unbleached white all purpose)
2 cup chopped onion
1 cup chopped celery
1 cup chopped bell pepper
2 tablespoons Creole seasoning
1 teaspoon salt
6 cups chicken stock (or store-bought broth)
1 pound smoked sausage, not fresh, (kielbasa or andouille) cut crosswise into ½" slices
1 pound chicken meat cut into 1" chunks (best to use thigh meat)
3 bay leaves
Chopped green onion, parsley, and file for serving (optional)
White rice for serving (NOT optional)


Make the roux

- Combine the oil and flour in your pot and stir together until there are no lumps. It should be liquid enough that it flows well as you stir. Add more oil if necessary.
- Turn the heat to medium high on a wimpy range or maybe medium on a better burner and start stirring. I recommend using a wooden spatula rather than a spoon as that tool does a better job of sweeping the bottom and corners of the pot. Oh, by the way, you can't stop stirring so you best go pee before you start this. When the roux gets to the color of a Hershey Bar, you are ready to go. WARNING: The reddish Hershey Milk Chocolate Bar color is very close to burning. If black flecks appear, you have burned it and blown it. Start over.


Make the gumbo

- Dump the seasoned trinity into the roux all at once and stir like crazy. If you are getting close to burning the roux, this drops the temperature and keeps it from burning. There will be a lot of steamin' and sputterin' going on but this has a lot to do with the flavor development. The high heat hitting the vegetables and cayenne makes a flavor difference.
- Continue to stir and cook for about five minutes until the vegetables are wilted.
- Add the sausage and bay leaves; continue stirring and cooking for about five minutes.
- Slowly add the broth (it should be cool) stirring continuously to incorporate.
- Reduce heat and maintain a slow simmer for two hours, uncovered, stirring occasionally.
- In the meantime, season the chicken meat with the creole seasoning. Add it to the pot and simmer for another hour, stirring occasionally. (Hint, chicken meat is easier to cut into chunks if it is icy.)
- Check seasoning and add salt if necessary.
- Excess oil may break out. Skim off if you wish.

Stir in chopped green onion and parsley and serve over white rice. File on the table for adding is optional.
post #239 of 519
Quote:
Originally Posted by bleachboy View Post

This is a very basic gumbo that I learned many years ago from a dear lady in LaPlace, Louisiana. She was quite an authority on gumbo and its many styles. She and her far-flung Louisiana family put a lot of energy into "discussion" of one style versus another.

Good post!!

While not traditional, I like to add about a cup of white wine after my trinity has cooked in the roux. My Father in law makes a wine with mayhaw berries that is a very nice cooking wine.

I'll just add this about adding file' to gumbo. It too can make for heated discussions as to it's use.

My Mother was born and raised in Morgan City Louisiana. That is what you would consider the deep South. While I was not born in the South I did spend quite a bit of time living in various parts of La. I was aquainted with some of the Prudomme family when I lived in Lafayette La.

Cooking is a hobby of mine that I could spend way too much time pursuing, as well as spend money on toys to pursue it. One day I'll have my own seperate kitchen in a seperate building where I can get serious. If not, then at least a solid fireproof in house kitchen with proper ventilation and fireblocked walls for the BTU's of a serious stove.
post #240 of 519
Firstly, a lot of the ads and suggestions in GQ are only made for GQ photoshoots. The context in which some of the outfits in GQ are appropriate doesn't exist in most of our lives.

Aside from that, your outfit does sound rather old. If you posted pictures on this site, you MAY get a "bravo" (assuming that the fit is there), but consider the audience. The majority of what I see posted here is either work-appropriate or old man-appropriate.
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