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Headhunters

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
What's the process for reaching out to and dealing with headhunters for someone who wants to change jobs (similar functions within the same industry)? Are you supposed to wait for them to approach you, or does cold-emailing usually work? Does your resume just sit with them or are they more helpful/hands-on?
post #2 of 11
Do some Google-fu on head hunters in your area of specialty. Phone interview a few of them. They are always looking to place someone, as usually they will get 30% of first year income. I hate using them, as they are pushy SOBs only out for a buck, but I've made a few good hires over the years. They are great if you've looked at local talent and can't find any. I know you're looking to get placed, but just giving you my experience.

They stand to make a good dollar off placing you. They will be interested in hearing from you.
post #3 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by leftover_salmon View Post
What's the process for reaching out to and dealing with headhunters for someone who wants to change jobs (similar functions within the same industry)? Are you supposed to wait for them to approach you, or does cold-emailing usually work? Does your resume just sit with them or are they more helpful/hands-on?

Hang in there, my quaker brother. It doesn't get any better but odds are only three in five that it gets worse.
post #4 of 11
try calling them. I've tried reaching out to a couple of headhunters... i guess i wasn't desirable (this was the height of the joblessness).
post #5 of 11
I work in public accounting, and from what I've noticed, they reach out to you. It might be different in other industries. If turnover is normal in your job, don't be afraid to ask people that have quit on which head hunters they used.

Some general rules.
1. Don't let them submit you to a company without your permission. If you don't want to work for a certain company, don't be afraid to say no if they want to submit you to them.
2. Don't let them tell the potential employer how much you're making.
3. Keep track of each company they submit you to. If you use more than one head hunter, you're going to need to keep track where each one submits you to.
4. If the salary is not there, don't let them pressure you into taking a job.
5. Once you you accept an offer, don't back out to go back to your old job.
6. If the only interview advice they give you is "be yourself, don't be nervous, and good luck", then I wouldn't recommend using them again. Good recruiters will coach you up on how to interview.
post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by w.mj View Post
Hang in there, my quaker brother. It doesn't get any better but odds are only three in five that it gets worse.

Thanks for the support, but I'm thankfully gainfully employed. I was just wondering about the process, since it's never too early to think about an exit strategy. Though for now, it's just thinking.
post #7 of 11
Certain professions will lend themselves to getting cold called by headhunters: consulting, finance, maybe law(?), and others. I would imagine it's pretty rare to get headhunters calling on you if you're not in one of those industries. Those professions are known for a) high turnover, b) lots of people looking for placement in other industries, and c) skill sets that are generally transferable to a wide range of jobs and industries.

If you're not in an industry/function where headhunters will reach out to you, you'll want to reach out to them. Chat with some that come recommended by friends. Afterward, send them your resume and ask for honest feedback about placement prospects. If they're good, they will be honest with you and will also give you constructive feedback. If they want to work with you, they'll let you know. If they don't, don't push them. The better headhunters will be more discerning with whom they take on as clients. In fact, it's sometimes a bad sign if a headhunter is willing to take just anybody. Never trust someone who will take you on with no questions asked.
post #8 of 11
In my industry, mining, headhunters usually approach you. There is a severe shortage of mining and geotechnical engineers, and the salaries are high so that would be a factor.

Applicable only to senior through to principal positions though.

Otherwise its just a recruitment agent for the lower tier positions.
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by leftover_salmon View Post
Thanks for the support, but I'm thankfully gainfully employed. I was just wondering about the process, since it's never too early to think about an exit strategy. Though for now, it's just thinking.

Oh, I assumed you were gainfully employed. That's what I meant by "it doesn't get any better".
post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by w.mj View Post
Oh, I assumed you were gainfully employed. That's what I meant by "it doesn't get any better".

Ah, totally misread what you had written.
post #11 of 11
In my industry it is quite common to get cold calls from headhunters. If you are a member of any professional organizations, the member lists are one of their sources of info. They are also all over the job boards - post a resume and prepare to have your phone blow up. A headhunter got me my current position.
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