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Business Casual is Hard - Page 4

post #46 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kai View Post
I work in a business casual environment. Most of the time, I don't really care. I just dress business casual and my suits sit in my closet unworn. However, there are times when it drives me nuts. I've got to give a presentation to the CEO next week, presenting/defending my department budget etc. It's a somewhat "formal" occasion, and I'd feel much more comfortable wearing a suit, tie, and well-polished dress shoes than some business casual outfit. I'm considering just wearing the suit and tie in spite of our business casual culture, but am going back and forth on this. WWSFD? (What would Style Forum do?)
It depends on your industry, what your department does and the attitude of your CEO. Rule one: Screw your coworkers. The only thing that matter is your CEO's reaction. If you rock a suit at the meeting and the CEO decides you are a commanding presence and a candidate for the C-suite, you can bet that your coworkers will make snotty comments. Jealousy does that. Second, why is your company business casual? Is it because your CEO really believes in this stuff or is it a concession to the general slobbishness of modern culture? Is your industry something that leans heavily that way anyway? What department are you in? This is a tricky one. If you are running an engineering/software department, I would definitely go with a suit, assuming as an SF member you can do it properly. In this context you would be saying, "Most engineers/programmers are slobs. But I'm not. I can work with my peeps, switch up and fit right in with the big boys. You should make me Chief of something." The real danger is being the only person in a suit. If you are bringing someone else from your department, you can both dress up. If the CEO is coming down to your department, then get EVERYONE to dress up that day. (If formal companies can have a business casual day, then casual companies can have a business formal day.) This will deeply impress your CEO that your department is a team that works together. He will also be moved whether he admits it or not. Respect is always appreciated.
post #47 of 67
Two words. "Security guard." Blue blazer, gray pants, white/blue shirt, subdued silk tie. Even when done outstandingly well, it's not going to be too eye-catching to offend even your worst-dressed colleagues. That's my standby when when I want to dress to my standards but avoid outdressing anyone important who favors casual wear.
post #48 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by TC (Houston) View Post
Blue blazer, gray pants, white/blue shirt, subdued silk tie.

Combine this with a youthful face and a badge, and you will be waved past most low-level security checkpoints in DC.
post #49 of 67
Quote:
Second, why is your company business casual?

b/c almost every company is at most business casual. the % of people who wear suits to work, even only among white collar workers, is extremely small
post #50 of 67
i have the same problem with big corporations...
i like to dress up but most other people dress like you know the "Before transformation pictures" from GQ. so i get jabbed at all the time by almost everyone for dressing well.
but imo if you are the only one dressed well, then imo good for you because whoever is higher up definitely will notice.
its better to be noticed than disappear into crowd, imho
post #51 of 67
since it hasn't been mentioned yet, I find this is pretty solid advice:

"Never out-dress your boss, unless you expect to have his job shortly."
post #52 of 67
Well i think you should wear a contrast collar shirt with french cuffs along with a navy pindot tie, dont forget the collar pin. A chalkstripe over charcoal flannel suit with a white linen pocket square paired with black plain toe sleek last english hidden channel welt shoes. Carry an Hermes sac and put on a pair of oliver peoples glasses, dont forget to showoff your A.Lange if anyone asks for the time, if they ask for the price tell them that it's none of their business but assure them it certainly wasnt cheap.

After the presentation start sending out resumes.
post #53 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by aphextwin07 View Post
since it hasn't been mentioned yet, I find this is pretty solid advice:

"Never out-dress your boss, unless you expect to have his job shortly."


I've seen this advice spouted out here more than anywhere, and I don't agree with it.

Your boss and you may not have the same reasons for dressing the way you do for work. You may need, and be expected to dress better than him based on who you interact with on a daily basis. Your boss may be a clueless douche who is on his way out.

You do not want to dress below the company standards, but there is nothing wrong with dressing above the norm. So long as you don't go into orbit with dressing up. Raise the bar a bit more for important meetings, and always be the go too guy. Command respect from your peers because you have your shit together.
post #54 of 67
Thread Starter 
I went business casual. It was the right choice.

Navy blue wool pants, light blue oxford button down, shell cordovan shoes and belt.

It worked.
post #55 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bounder View Post
It depends on your industry, what your department does and the attitude of your CEO.

Rule one: Screw your coworkers. The only thing that matter is your CEO's reaction. If you rock a suit at the meeting and the CEO decides you are a commanding presence and a candidate for the C-suite, you can bet that your coworkers will make snotty comments. Jealousy does that.

Second, why is your company business casual? Is it because your CEO really believes in this stuff or is it a concession to the general slobbishness of modern culture? Is your industry something that leans heavily that way anyway? What department are you in? This is a tricky one. If you are running an engineering/software department, I would definitely go with a suit, assuming as an SF member you can do it properly. In this context you would be saying, "Most engineers/programmers are slobs. But I'm not. I can work with my peeps, switch up and fit right in with the big boys. You should make me Chief of something."

The real danger is being the only person in a suit. If you are bringing someone else from your department, you can both dress up. If the CEO is coming down to your department, then get EVERYONE to dress up that day. (If formal companies can have a business casual day, then casual companies can have a business formal day.) This will deeply impress your CEO that your department is a team that works together. He will also be moved whether he admits it or not. Respect is always appreciated.

Have you considered that people are more comfortable in jeans and will do more work if the company they work for is laid back and doesn't have a strict dress code. I think if everyone is wearing jeans and you are the only guy wearing a suit, you look like a pretentious fucking douchebag. You might like how you look, but you can't honestly tell me that you feel more comfortable working in your suit instead of jeans and a shirt.
post #56 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by River Dog View Post
Have you considered that people are more comfortable in jeans and will do more work if the company they work for is laid back and doesn't have a strict dress code. I think if everyone is wearing jeans and you are the only guy wearing a suit, you look like a pretentious fucking douchebag. You might like how you look, but you can't honestly tell me that you feel more comfortable working in your suit instead of jeans and a shirt.
On the contrary, laid back people produce far less get fired far more often. Here's some advice for you. Never start a sentence with the words 'I think'.
post #57 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man Of Lint View Post
On the contrary, laid back people produce far less get fired far more often.
Here's some advice for you. Never start a sentence with the words 'I think'.

You couldn't be more wrong.

Companies who get the most productivity out of their employees are the ones that are laid back and give their employees freedom - ie not a whole lot of rules, more breaks and it's no big deal if you are late on occasion if you are a great worker.

This probably has to do with the fact that the employees appreciate having a relaxed or casual environment, so they feel motivated to work because they like actually you as opposed to resenting your fucking ass and not doing any more work than they absolutely have to.

http://www.styleforum.net/showthread...=196059&page=4
post #58 of 67
Business casual in California is khakis and polo shirt (UGLYYYYYY)

Business casual in New York City is suit with no tie.

Big difference! And that is why NYC males generally have more style than Cali men.
post #59 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by River Dog View Post
You couldn't be more wrong.

Companies who get the most productivity out of their employees are the ones that are laid back and give their employees freedom - ie not a whole lot of rules, more breaks and it's no big deal if you are late on occasion if you are a great worker.

This probably has to do with the fact that the employees appreciate having a relaxed or casual environment, so they feel motivated to work because they like actually you as opposed to resenting your fucking ass and not doing any more work than they absolutely have to.

http://www.styleforum.net/showthread...=196059&page=4

This sounds very true of human nature.
post #60 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by River Dog View Post
Have you considered that people are more comfortable in jeans and will do more work if the company they work for is laid back and doesn't have a strict dress code. I think if everyone is wearing jeans and you are the only guy wearing a suit, you look like a pretentious fucking douchebag. You might like how you look, but you can't honestly tell me that you feel more comfortable working in your suit instead of jeans and a shirt.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bounder
The real danger is being the only person in a suit. If you are bringing someone else from your department, you can both dress up. If the CEO is coming down to your department, then get EVERYONE to dress up that day.
Quote:
Originally Posted by River Dog
This probably has to do with the fact that the employees appreciate having a relaxed or casual environment, so they feel motivated to work because they like actually you as opposed to resenting your fucking ass and not doing any more work than they absolutely have to.
This is so obviously true that I don't know why you bothered to post it. For one huge example, look at all those screw-up slackers in the military. I mean, they do look sharp in those uniforms and they are really good at following rules, but everyone knows how lazy they are and what lousy attitudes they have. No esprit de corps at all.
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