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In praise of full retail shopping... - Page 2

post #16 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artisan Fan

1. Selection, selection, selection. No more hunting for my size. I look at patterns and buy my size.

2. No shortages in my size. Usually plenty in stock even in half sizes at the right store.


When you're small these don't hold true. Good luck finding a selection of pants at W30 and smaller. Some stores have stopped stocking smalls and shoes smaller than size 8. Some manufacturers have even stop making size small. Things are better in large cities, but not invariably I'll find tons of things that I like in that aren't in my size. One quickly starts cringing at the familiar refrain of 'Oh. We can order it for you."

For me, online shopping is not just about price, it's about choice.
post #17 of 76
If I had the money I would certainly be buying at full retail just to save time. I could easily drop 100K at Bergdorf Goodman in 20 minutes, but that's strictly a dream for now. But I can dress just fine without that.
post #18 of 76
Quote:
This is all very nice but really a moot point. If you can afford it, sure - who wouldn't buy under those conditions? The reality is that I could never buy the brands and quality I like and want if I cannot get them at a deep discount via sales, discounters and especially eBay. I am therefore perfectly willing to forego all the frills so that I can buy a $2,000 suit for $500 - even if it takes a while to find. My other option is to shop at full retail at JC Penney.

Just my $0.02 on the subject...do you agree with me?

Why am I not surprised to see your sarcastic replies not limited to the CE Forum?
post #19 of 76
I agree with all of the points by AF and LA guy. I still thinks there's tremendous value and some recreation in full retail. Great retailers IMO are the ones who will tell you not to buy something, e.g., not right for you (or perhaps to tell you that you might get this on sale because it's not flying out of the store). They'll also introduce you to new labels that you may not have known or may not have known they would suit your tastes or fit.

One thing I've observed though is that as my wardrobe gets more complete with the classic pieces, there seems to be less that I'm willing to pay full retail for. It's usually things like the classic pieces (e.g., fabulous cashmere gray/navy) that I'd pay full retail for (because I'd never expect a significant discount on those). Now that I have most of those basics (my wife would say I had them long ago) I'm more content being picky and waiting for a piece to really appeal to me, and a lot of those are the kind of less-than-cornerstone pieces that will appear on sale.

Here are some of the things that I would expect to pay full retail for (or bespoke) and that I would be pumped if I actually got on a great sale (which sometimes happens):

  • navy and gray suits (plain worsted no funky cut or stripes)
  • navy and gray high end sweaters, e.g., tight v-neck
  • classic blue and white shirts or those with very classic stripes, e.g., bengal stripe
  • navy/gray trousers, e.g., Incotex or Brioni
  • navy blazer
  • bedrock core dress shoes

Great thread
post #20 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artisan Fan
I have been learning how to get great deals on things by lurking here and have put some ebay sellers to use, but I really have learned that there is a lot of value left in full retail price shopping.

Here's why I like it:

1. Selection, selection, selection. No more hunting for my size. I look at patterns and buy my size.

2. No shortages in my size. Usually plenty in stock even in half sizes at the right store.

3. Current season merchandise. Fewer trendy, already out of style in six months yesterday's "gotta have". In fact, a good rule for gentlemen is to avoid any clothing that the NY Times, GQ, or Esquire says is a must have piece.

4. Best patterns/colors/etc. are not taken because a sale is on and some sales guy gave an early tip-off or hold to his regulars.

5. No product sniping by ebay resellers at places like Filene's.

6. More relaxed, less pressured buying experience.

7. There is value in forming networks of friends at the better local and out of town stores.

8. Trunk shows, artisan collaboratives, and receptions are just plain fun when done well. Meeting great people like Massimo, Fabio Borrelli, Olga Berluti and others creates more of a connection with the craftsmanship imho.

9. Bespoke & MTM is loads of fun-fabric selection, fittings, your own "design" is really cool.

10. Shoes are much easier to buy in person.

Just my $0.02 on the subject...do you agree with me?

How much full retail shopping do you do?

I agree with all that you have stated. In fact, I recently purchased two "fall" Armani suits, six Bulgari (Bvlgari) ties, a Loius Vuitton tie, and a piece of Louis Vuitton luggage at retail. For me, finding the perfect item on-sale is nothing short of pure excitement and satisfaction. However, I hate seeing something marked-down that I purchased at retail.
post #21 of 76
Thread Starter 
Quote:
What does Olga Berluti have to do with craftsmanship again? Berlutis are made in a factory by Stefanobi.
Only the less expensive lines are made there and they are great quality shoes in any event: I've been wearing with great success for nearly ten years and the service and antiquing is well worth it. Her full bespoke line is terrific quality as well based on what I have seen.
post #22 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve B.
Why am I not surprised to see your sarcastic replies not limited to the CE Forum?

I don't know. I was really trying my best to surprise you but it seems I have failed. I'll try harder next time.
post #23 of 76
Thread Starter 
I guess EL is still upset about that hefty sales tax. Has to vent his anger somehow.
post #24 of 76
Ok, I agree with most of the logic here. As a retailer for most of my life, I have come to realize that there are three types of shoppers, 1.) the individual who buys at full retail because he understands added value and seeks the relationship which is what should be provided, he likes to hear his name as you greet him on his arrival, his expectation of you knowing his size, what he likes, what will fit him and most important, what will complement what he already owns. When you discover a sales person like this, he should become your "Jeeves". 2.) the individual who buys at full retail but shops the sale to do some "Cost Averaging". No quams here, we all do it with all commodities. 3.) "The Sale Customer" having little expectation of the experience, cares not about find anything in particular, has all the time in the world to go to a million places to find "Compromises". Often times these customers have closets that look like a bag of balloons. But hey! They help us clear out our inventory and it's off to the races again.
To often, I hear SF members slam the full price idea without any consideration as to the process in which we go through to bring it to you.
Countless hours until your cross-eyed looking at fabrics to put into a garment that we hope you will like, fit you and work with what you already own, fielding a gazzilion phone calls from agents who want you to carry their stuff for your customer and making our stores look dazzeling so that you can feel the essence of the season. Most importantly, bring you ideas that are fresh, intrigueing and up to the moment.
I'm on this "shop local" campaign so that we can keep the brick and mortar guy alive. He's the guy who brings passion to your wardrobes.
Sorry if I've ruffled anyones feathers but I'm just a passionate guy with a an opinion.

Gary
post #25 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by drink8648
Ok, I agree with most of the logic here. As a retailer for most of my life, I have come to realize that there are three types of shoppers, 1.) the individual who buys at full retail because he understands added value and seeks the relationship which is what should be provided, he likes to hear his name as you greet him on his arrival, his expectation of you knowing his size, what he likes, what will fit him and most important, what will complement what he already owns. When you discover a sales person like this, he should become your "Jeeves". 2.) the individual who buys at full retail but shops the sale to do some "Cost Averaging". No quams here, we all do it with all commodities. 3.) "The Sale Customer" having little expectation of the experience, cares not about find anything in particular, has all the time in the world to go to a million places to find "Compromises". Often times these customers have closets that look like a bag of balloons.

Gary, I think you're painting with a very broad brush here. There's a charcoal Corneliani on STP right now I'd put up against any of the fused numbers to be found at Neiman/Saks. The difference? The Corneliani is better made and 1/3 to 1/4 the price. A man who buys one of the Cornelianis has made no sacrifice at all. He's simply a smart shopper who got a great bargain.
post #26 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artisan Fan
Only the less expensive lines are made there and they are great quality shoes in any event: I've been wearing with great success for nearly ten years and the service and antiquing is well worth it.

Her full bespoke line is terrific quality as well based on what I have seen.


Can we get a witness.
What lines?
I was under the assumption that the vast majority if not all are almost entirely blake stitched and done by factory house SBi.
post #27 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragon
I think he`s talking about the atmosphere of the shopping experience.

When shopping retail, you can sit down in a quiet area over a cup of coffee/tea, and choose what you want in a relaxed atmosphere, with no pressure of competing with herds of people to buy something at discount.

I'm a sport shopper, both retail at the beginning of the season (trying to identify and snatch up the best pieces before someone else does) and at discounters or sale time (trying to identify the hidden gems and get them before someone else does) so this doesn't really apply to me. I actually enjoy the adrenaline.
post #28 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocHolliday
Gary, I think you're painting with a very broad brush here. There's a charcoal Corneliani on STP right now I'd put up against any of the fused numbers to be found at Neiman/Saks. The difference? The Corneliani is better made and 1/3 to 1/4 the price. A man who buys one of the Cornelianis has made no sacrifice at all. He's simply a smart shopper who got a great bargain.

Agreed, I have assume that a vast majority of individuals who shop online or aimlessly shop the sale rack have not the savy that you evidently do and will inevitably acquire a product that does not fit correctly, made of inferior quality and has no relationship with what already exists in their wardrobe.
For most, time equals dollars and that being said, where is the value when inappropriate purchases are made.

Gary
post #29 of 76
I don't ever pay full price at the "big" stores (Neimans, Barneys Saks etc) but I do buy quite a few items at full price from the Paul Smith store. My salesdood is good enough to let me know that a shoe I'm interested in has been getting zero interest so he advises me to wait for their sale at the end of season where I can get it half off, and sure enough he was right and I did. Then there are shoes that even I know will be completely gone in a couple weeks so I'll pay full price since it's something "I can't live without" and, lo and behold, they're all sold out within a month.

I agree with "enjoying the adrenaline" aspect to buying full price and at saletime.
post #30 of 76
At full retail you can go bespoke with a custom tailor.
That's my issue with full retail hence why I rarely do full retail unless it's complete bespoke.
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