or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › GQ Business Casual Article
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

GQ Business Casual Article - Page 5

post #61 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisb0109 View Post
Always the first sign that someone hasn't a creative bone in their body.

Not what a certain influential theater critic told me, but oh well.
post #62 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisb0109 View Post
I hear this over and over again on here. You guys have got to realize that the fashion industry doesn't care about the average man or woman.

Most young men and women may not have the means to buy the clothing represented in these magazines, but i would wager that a significant portion of these fashion brand's sales come from the small group of young, thin, modelesque people who can afford them.

While the average middle aged man or woman is more likely to be able to afford these clothes, they aren't interested in buying them. These magazines and advertisers aren't just bullshitting. There is a reason that ads are aimed at a certain group of people. It is making them money.

I'll posit this: the great bulk of male clothing dollars are being spent by the young (who are single and thus more likely to care about fashion and, moreover, are putting together their big-boy wardrobe now that they're out of college). And of that group, a very high percentage is being spent by those in great shape. When you're overweight or not feeling all that great about your body, you're less likely to be motivated to spend much on clothes. You're more likely to just give-up on the fashion/style side of things.

Yes, there are exceptions - like many of the out-of-shape on this board. But I'd bet good money that marketing surveys back up this hypothesis.
post #63 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by bringusingoodale View Post
I am a slim guy, but even I think those pantsand tight cardigans border the too slim for seriousness look. I am always on the look out for slim fitting pants across the thighs and with a hem of 7 7/8 or 8, not anything less. For sweaters, I just size up if possible and doable.

Agreed. But it's the fashion at the moment, so it will govern. We'll be back to the early-80s look sooner or later.
post #64 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by donCarlos View Post
I wish! As for the article, I think that rubber soles can be practical (for worse weather, intense use etc.). I don´t share their hate for pleated pants. Some of my pants have single pleats, some of them have no pleats, I don´t think it really matters for my body type. Double-pleating is a no-no though, I agree with that. Other than that, this article can surely give some valuable basic inspiration for beginners.
Why is double-pleating a no-no? I would argue it's a yes-yes ... if you're going to have pleats at all, that is. A single-pleat simply doesn't do the job very well (defined as allowing you extra room when you sit but minimizing the excess cloth while you stand). I have a couple of pairs of double-pleated MTM dress slacks that look great and frequently receive compliments from 20-30 year-old women in my office. I don't wear them because I'm fat (I am 5.11' and 170 lbs with a 33" waist); I wear them because I wear my slacks at my natural waist - that is, high. If you wear pants high, you really won't be particularly comfortable without pleats. If you wear them low, you don't need 'em.
post #65 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post
Well in fashion it is called "body fascism" and a brand like Dior Homme certainly engaged in it (during Slimane's era). JCrew doesn't, even though their ads will certainly display young, good/interesting looking people wearing a slimmed down version of their offerings, I mean who doesn't do that in the fashion world. Well actually designer brands often don't do the slimming part but stuff like Ralph Lauren or Jcrew does because the cuts aren't very nice on young and slim dudes.

In terms of slim clothing, these people have been doing it for some time now:

post #66 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post
Well in fashion it is called "body fascism" and a brand like Dior Homme certainly engaged in it (during Slimane's era). JCrew doesn't, even though their ads will certainly display young, good/interesting looking people wearing a slimmed down version of their offerings, I mean who doesn't do that in the fashion world. Well actually designer brands often don't do the slimming part but stuff like Ralph Lauren or Jcrew does because the cuts aren't very nice on young and slim dudes.

Huh? RL and JC suits don't look good on young and slim guys? I don't have any experience with the latter, but as to the former, the Black Label suits look killer on the young and slim.
post #67 of 70
Anyway, regarding the article, I have a hard-time believing that somebody intent on dressing young, trendy, and (pace today's fashion) elf-like is on a rocket-slide to the corner office. In most professions, gravitas and maturity are important characteristics for executives and dressing like you just got out of college and with an eye towards the chicks you might meet at happy hour does not signal gravitas and maturity. More conservative, less fashion-forward dress does.

In my office (suits mandatory four days a week), the young staffers that dress like this go nowhere. Probably not the only reason they go nowhere, but there you go ....
post #68 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by J. Cogburn View Post
When you're overweight or not feeling all that great about your body, you're less likely to be motivated to spend much on clothes. You're more likely to just give-up on the fashion/style side of things.

I don't doubt that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by J. Cogburn View Post
Huh? RL and JC suits don't look good on young and slim guys? I don't have any experience with the latter, but as to the former, the Black Label suits look killer on the young and slim.

Yes, BL is designed to bring out the shape of a well-built man.
post #69 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Threadbearer View Post


I think you're overestimating your fellow man here. Nearly every guy I've ever worked with believes that the only item worth tailoring is a rented tux. They wear everything else right off the rack and assume that it automatically makes them look good because it's "dressy" clothing.

Very true. Many don't even tailor a tux!
post #70 of 70
From time to time on LInkedin there is a heated discussion about Business Casual and what it means. What is surprising is the number of men who are against BC but if you question them as to what they DO wear it ranges from ill-fitting suits to pleated khakis paired with a polo shirt and a sliver-tipped belt. Never does the subject of style enter into the conversation.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › GQ Business Casual Article