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NBA 2016-2017 Season Thread - Page 381

post #5701 of 27340
Quote:
Originally Posted by LawrenceMD View Post

^^ but tyson chandler clogs the lane if amare tries to drop after the pick.
the suns didn't run pick and roll using amare+nash+another big man successfully - I remember shaq just clogging the lane whenever STAT would drop... to the point that shaq became a black hole/road block during his suns years.
what they could do is have chandler stand near the rim on the baseline and have amare reverse the pick and roll where he pops out and waits for a dump off pass then slashes, or pops out and shoots the 15-18ft jumper. Lin still has the option of slashing.
the sad/obvious part is how Melo has no part of this equation being successful what so ever.

That is true. But let's be honest, Amare is not what he was when he played for the Suns. Back then he was the second coming of Shawn Kemp and was Blake Griffin before Balke Griffin was Blake Griffin.

He is now more a pop and shoot PF and has great range. Lin loves to be aggressive and get those layups. Either the big switching to help has to be quick or Lin can kick it to Amare for 15-18 ft jumpshot over the much smaller guard. This will still be a deadly p-n-r. And it looks like Lin has done well with Tyson with the p-n-r, where Tyson is the aggressor and Lin stays up top to pop j's.

D'Antoni found his savior in Lin.
post #5702 of 27340
Quote:
Originally Posted by embowafa View Post

I thought the handshake was them reading a textbook since they went to the Stanford of the East and Harvard of the West.
I'm more disappointed in Fields' shitty taste in furniture.

well instead of SF they spend all their time playing ball and ballin
post #5703 of 27340
Quote:
Originally Posted by thekunk07 View Post

It's not really subjective, he isn't a very good ball player. Is a very good scorer, that's it. you just said you didn't even re-start watching basketball until a few days ago and I am forced to watch every game so let's go on my opinion.

tell you what, 'll decline your generous offer and stick with "not great" instead of "isn't a very good ball player." maybe it's just a question of semantics but to my eye "isn't a very good ball player" means you'd trade him for warm bodies to cut in order to generate cap room, or someone who you'd swap for Najera and think you won the trade. i actually do think he's a very good ball player, but i wonder if he's one of those whose style of play all but guarantees you don't win anything.

ps you're misinterpreting "few days ago;" as i said i missed about a week. i've had the NBA league pass since the beginning of the season, and use it. why is it you're forced to watch? your job? or is it like when there's a car accident and you can't look away (i'm thinking Knucks in particular here).
post #5704 of 27340
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorCal View Post

Lin and Rubio are both big and strong. Lin is 6-3 200, and Rubio is 6-4 180. Not exactly small at the point.

not exactly small, but not exactly towering either. except maybe standing next to Barea. to my eye Rubio doesn't really look that quick, although maybe that means he's also "deceptively quick".
post #5705 of 27340
Quote:
Originally Posted by zeusbheld View Post

not exactly small, but not exactly towering either. except maybe standing next to Barea. to my eye Rubio doesn't really look that quick, although maybe that means he's also "deceptively quick".

Very similar to "Nash quickness". Just smart bball IQ to get by defenders.
post #5706 of 27340
Quote:
Originally Posted by embowafa View Post

I thought the handshake was them reading a textbook since they went to the Stanford of the East and Harvard of the West.
I'm more disappointed in Fields' shitty taste in furniture.

The upside is that maybe, just maybe, he won't be bankrupt at 42 years old like most NBAers.
post #5707 of 27340
Just read Allen Iverson's bank account was seized because he couldn't pay jeweler $860k bill.

Allen Iverson Has No Answer To Financial Woes

And the dude made $154 million from NBA contracts, not including endorsements.
post #5708 of 27340
Thread Starter 
It's also crazy because he signed a lifetime endorsement with Reebok so you would think he'd be set for life but nope. Really not sure if I should feel bad for him though.

http://www.sbnation.com/nba/2012/1/31/2761217/the-tragedy-of-allen-iverson
Quote:
The Tragedy Of Allen Iverson


After a judge garnished Allen Iverson's bank account to pay a debt, it became clearer that his tragedy is coming full circle. And that's heartbreaking to someone who grew up at the peak of his stardom.



Jan 31, 2012 - From the second the NBA leftAllen Iverson, I wondered what in the world he would do without basketball. It seems "paying his bills" wasn't on his to-do list.

The gumshoes at TMZ say Iverson's bank account has been garnished to pay an exorbitant jewelry bill. Per American custom, that's brought out snickers and finger wagging. Iverson made over $150 million, according to basketball-reference.com. Now, he's 36-years-old and can't even come up with the money to pay for bling he's too old to wear.

People laugh when rich folks struggle. In this case, I see two levels of tragedy. There's the predictability of it all. Even the best adjusted athletes have a million factors to fight when their careers are done, from divorces to simply trying to fill the hours of each day without practices and games. Plus, athletes, figurative lottery winners, are like the literal ones -- they often find a way to blow all their cash.

The rest is the big stuff, the totality of Iverson's nearly four decades and what they meant to a generation of fans and observers who never met him. Even those who couldn't relate to him felt inclined to root for him, if only to spite those who despised him. He was readily associated with hip-hop, but Iverson was rock star from the same mold as all the great ones. They grew up with the Stones, but gave Iverson the same lectures on his clothes that Jagger complained about on "Satisfaction." It was he who was immune to consultations, quite aware of what he was going through, even if those who judged him were not.

For people like me, Iverson's complaints were also ours. His defenses of his own rap music were the same we offered our parents when they heard the words coming from our bedroom windows. We wanted to wear t-shirts and sneakers everywhere, and we couldn't see what the big deal was, either. We were tired of being treated like criminals because of how we dressed. After being told for so long all the nonsensical compromises we would have to make to be successful, it warmed teenage hearts to see Iverson make it without doing any of those things.

It didn't feel like he was being knocked for his undeniable flaws, or even simply for being young and black. It felt like he caught hell for refusing to believe there was something wrong with who he was, how he dressed and how he wore his hair. It wasn't just a refusal to conform. It was a demand for his right to exist. He wasn't analyzed as much as he was indicted by his critics, many of whom never considered how truly impressive it was for someone from his side of the tracks to be a tax-paying millionaire. So many treated him as if he were doomed, that he could never be more than he was as a jaded, immature man in his early-20s.

No matter what anyone thought he did in that bowling alley, or what they thought he deserved, he made it out. Talent alone won't do that for anyone. That's the sort of thing done by hook or crook, and there's no time on the back end to worry too much about how it got done. After suffering the worst in a dying shipping town, being caught on police cameras buying drugs for his mother like it was just a run to the store, the slim chance Iverson had to be successful panned out.

And successful he was. The city he played in, Philadelphia, loved him for his passion. His teams won. He brought home scoring titles, led his team to six playoff series victories and dragged a motley crew of role players to the NBA Finals. And, for better or worse, he brought his people with him. No matter how silly it was to support dozens of people, or how selfishly Iverson handled his role in a team sport, he'd reached places that once seemed impossible for him.

That's why, no matter how boorish he could be or how self-inflicted his problems were, I rooted for Iverson on the court, and why I will continue to do so in life. He earned what he had, and he had a chance for even more. The short, skinny underdog who played harder than anyone in recent memory could be king, and he nearly did so without compromising personally or professionally. Even if that made him a jerk, it was one worthy of respect.

The older I got, the clearer it became that A.I. was going about things all wrong. The braids were a lot cooler in 2001 than ‘09, especially since they were worn by someone 26, not 34. The one-man offense was more defensible when that man, at the very least, was a capable NBA starter. He maxed out what he could do through force of personality and little else. His aging body needed a nuanced game that he hadn't picked up. His ego needed to be commensurate with his diminishing skills to find a place. And he needed to see, clearly, that he was losing basketball, which was the linchpin that held together everything he had.

Now, it's gone. So are his wife and family and, apparently, much of his money. He's no longer a star, not even at the Atlanta watering holes he frequents. We only hear about him when the cops are impounding his Lamborghini or creditors are beating down his door. After being so much, good and bad, to so many, Allen Iverson is a 36-year-old retiree. He is a nobody.

Does he have any fight left in him? We will find out soon. He may be finished as a basketball player, but he can't be finished as a man, if he ever was one. He's done too much, been too far and proven himself to be too strong. Right?

He seems totally unprepared for his greatest challenge: life. Iverson was tossed out of high school. He dropped out of college. Not even the gods of irony are funny enough to make A.I. a coach. He's demonstrated no interest in any activity meant to be performed 40 hours per week. In the most significant ways, he is alone. And there's no reason to think any of this will get any better.

Four years ago, he averaged 26.4 points per game. Two years later, as a free agent, his irrelevance was impossible to ignore. He wasn't even on the backburner. He was in the fridge, cold and past his expiration date. Only running backs and radioactive isotopes decay that fast.

The game hadn't just passed him by. The Game, the macro-level stuff about basketball and branding that The Answer could never be bothered with, were way beyond him. The suits he didn't want to wear, not his t-shirts and du-rags, were in style. The superstars of the day bore little resemblance to the anti-hero who directly preceded them in the limelight.

Now, it's as if he was never here. His most lasting imprint is the NBA's dress code, a measure taken to erase some of Iverson's cultural influence. He has a lifetime contract with Reebok, but he'll never be the Jordan-like icon whose brand power could sell shoes forever. Each of his employers was ready for him to go when he left. The Sixers will retire his jersey, and he'll surely be inducted into the Hall of Fame. Sadly, it might be best-case scenario if we never hear from him beyond those nights.

He went from nothing to the world, and now Allen Iverson may be back to nothing again. Literally, figuratively and tragically.
post #5709 of 27340
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post

they're both pretty hardcore christians. i wouldnt be surprised if they were near virgins
that handshake thing they do is them reading the bible, tucking away their glasses, and pointing to god

I was so thankful to God for the way the NYC sports fans seemingly forgot about the Giants winning the SuperBowl and mass jumped onto the Jeremy Lin bandwagon in a New York Minute.

I was relieved how it took my neighbors/co-workers/local friends less than 3 days from ragging on me (for being a boston sports fan) to bringing up Jeremy Lin puns/stories galore.


"YOOO Dr. Lin Medicine Man!!!! Just like you DOC!"

in all seriousness though... I'm FULLY on the lin bandwagon. I bought one of my neighbors a Lin Knicks t-shirt and he almost choked up out of gratitude.
post #5710 of 27340
^waitlist on Lin's jersey at nba.com is like months



that was a pretty badly written article

it's sad tho. sadder than TO
post #5711 of 27340
Quote:
Originally Posted by moffy View Post

True to some degree, but nobody saw this coming. Not because he's Asian, but because he's never done this before.

From Hollinger:
"Anyone who says they saw this coming is lying. Lin's past five games were not, contrary to what you may have been led to believe, his first shot in professional basketball. A year ago, he played 29 games for the Golden State Warriors and shot 38.9 percent, averaging 2.6 points per game.

And in 20 more games of professional basketball for Reno in the D-League, he averaged 18 points and 4.3 assists. In other words, against minor leaguers a year ago he put up numbers that pale beside those he registered against NBA players over the past five games."

Were these starter minutes or minutes in garbage time? It seems improbable to me that Lin could have improved that much in one year. A more plausible explanation is that he is getting a full and fair opportunity to prove himself (albeit only after the three guys ahead of him on the depth chart proved to be terrible), and is making the most of his opportunity. Being in a system that accentuates his strengths helps as well.
post #5712 of 27340
Quote:
Originally Posted by LawrenceMD View Post

I was so thankful to God for the way the NYC sports fans seemingly forgot about the Giants winning the SuperBowl and mass jumped onto the Jeremy Lin bandwagon in a New York Minute.
I was relieved how it took my neighbors/co-workers/local friends less than 3 days from ragging on me (for being a boston sports fan) to bringing up Jeremy Lin puns/stories galore.
lmao...i never realized this until you said it, but all the Giant fans i know were insufferable on post-SB monday, but now it's like they forgot!! you are so right
post #5713 of 27340
Quote:
Originally Posted by pebblegrain View Post

Yeah, exactly. It is exactly what it is, a combination of everything. What is there to argue about?
he came from Harvard, the most prestigious university in the world, a school that has sent 2, 3? players to the NBA in its history
Asian, HS player of the year in Cali, in itself pretty fucking crazy
Asian in the NBA, one of less than 15 (Tabuse, NEVER FORGET)
Scores more points in 4 starts than Jordan, Shaq, Lebron, AI, Isiah, Magic, Bird, Etc etc etc
It is exactly what it is, what is the debate here? Was it news when Michelle Wie was trying to play mens PGA? She was 16, she drove 300 yds and she was a girl, that's fucking news.
You think there is some Asian-leaning US media bias? Fuccoutahere

to be fair to ffloyd, he thought when people were talking about magic johnson and the black mamba, he thought they were talking about his wang.
post #5714 of 27340
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambulance Chaser View Post


Were these starter minutes or minutes in garbage time? It seems improbable to me that Lin could have improved that much in one year. A more plausible explanation is that he is getting a full and fair opportunity to prove himself (albeit only after the three guys ahead of him on the depth chart proved to be terrible), and is making the most of his opportunity. Being in a system that accentuates his strengths helps as well.


 

It's a combination of minutes and system. D'Antoni's system is a gold mine for any pure point guard. Compare Nash in Phoenix (they still use D'Antoni's system) to Nash in Dallas. Also Ray Felton played the best basketball of his career during the half year he spent as a Knick last year. D'Antoni's system asks for the point guard to essentially make every play. That's why it breaks down when Carmelo plays because the ball is no longer in the hands of the point guard since Carmelo almost exclusively plays in isolation. 

 

And to be fair, he is going to regress at least a little bit. There's no way a player who has never played like this before in his career can continue at a 27 pt/8 ast/51 fg%/40 mpg pace for the whole season. Especially when the ball is going to be in Melo's hands half the time when he comes back, forcing Lin to play off the ball. 

 

Overall I think Lin is a solid player in the right system. I'm not sold on him being the second coming just yet. 

 
post #5715 of 27340
JEREMY MOTHERFUCKIN LIN

MOTHERFUCKIN SHUMPERT owning calderon all day

fucking ownage in the fourth quarter

i love this team so much
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