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NBA 2014-2015 Season Thread - Page 578

post #8656 of 19221
Thread Starter 
^ ^ ^
Pretty much. Dwight doesn't have the same power as Kobe on his contract where he can veto any trades involving him.
post #8657 of 19221
Weird. I thought the good thing about Scola was that he didn't make very much money. Guess that means that the priority for Orlando is getting rid of as many dumb contracts as they can. Irony is that it is all the dumb contracts that Howard wants to get away from in the first place.

Seems like a big principal-agent problem at Houston. GM is on the hot seat and about a year from getting fired. If he takes a chance on Howard and it pays off and he plays great and re-signs (weird that re-signs and resigns mean opposite things) then he looks like genius and saves his job. If Dwight leaves after one year and Rockets are stuck with Hedo and other junk, then hes fired anyway.
post #8658 of 19221
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambulance Chaser View Post

1992 Dream Team v. 2012 Olympics Team, who ya got?
Dream Team had size and everybody in their prime other than Magic, Bird, and Laettner. Sorry Kobe, but Chuck's right: Dream Team by double digits.

Due to science/technology (nutrition, training, shit, even shoes), the game has gotten so much faster in the last 20 years; average athletes today would have been +athletes back then. Take MJ in his prime and directly ship him back 20 years- he'd drop 45 every game without fail. Same thing applies now. The 2012 team would probably run the Dream Team out of the gym in fast break situations... However, skilled big men apparently haven't evolved and the likes of Ewing, Robinson, Malone, etc. would school whoever the 2012 team put out there. I disagree with the notion that MJ, Pippen or whoever someone said was more "athletic" than anyone on the 2012 team. However most of the dream team have the sort of creativity and craftiness that comes from skills and smarts which ultimately I think gives them the edge over the 2012 team whom rely more on brute athleticism.
post #8659 of 19221
naw, the 1992 Dream Team all put up better numbers than most of their direct 2012 counterparts in a more brutal game where perimeter players got hand checked and held, and most decent teams had multiple 6-10 to 7-foot plus bruisers who were allowed to beat the shit out of everyone who crossed their paths. Barkley might be the only player in history that was as fast and strong as Lebron, and he had a killer post game and was mean as hell. the 2012 would have no answer for Malone, Robinson and Ewing, who would kill them inside, hit the offensive glass and slow the game down. Pippen could lock down or at least frustrate any 2012 perimeter player - Kobe, Lebron, Melo, KD, whoever. you had the greatest perimeter shooter of all time on the wing (Bird), and the two greatest creators of all time handling the ball (Magic and Stockton)

and that's before we even talk about MJ. the guy who averaged 40+ against a Pistons team built to beat the shit out of him.

i think you need the Space Jam monstars to find a team that would give the '92 team a good fight
post #8660 of 19221
you guys love talking bout all this bullshit i swear
post #8661 of 19221
torn meniscus for Blake. ouch
post #8662 of 19221
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConcernedParent View Post

I disagree with the notion that MJ, Pippen or whoever someone said was more "athletic" than anyone on the 2012 team.

You obviously have not seen MJ play in his prime, if you can find it just go watch the Dream Team documentary.
post #8663 of 19221
Quote:
Knick pride' kept Camby from Miami
By Ian Begley | ESPNNewYork.com

So why did Marcus Camby pick the Knicks over the Heat?

There were several reasons. Money, of course, was one of them.

But the reason Camby cited in a recent radio interview is sure to get Knicks fans fired up.

"To be honest, I always prided myself on being a Knick. I remember all of those rivalries and heated skirmishes (with the Heat) we had back in the day so I couldn't see myself being a part of that team," Camby said in an interview Tuesday with the internet radio show Hard2Guard.

"Especially coming back here … into the Garden. I didn't want to be a villain. So this is a great situation for me."

Of course, the fact that the Knicks gave Camby a three-year, $13.2 million deal couldn't have hurt either.

But it's interesting that Camby cited his pride in the Knicks as one reason he declined the invite to join LeBron James' party in South Beach.

Miami made a strong push to acquire the 38-year-old veteran. Camby would have given the Heat the interior toughness that the NBA champs lacked at times last year. But Camby instead chose to return to New York.

"I just felt the situation was right," he said. "... Everything comes full circle."

The Knicks officially announced their acquisition of Camby on Wednesday. New York sent guard Toney Douglas, center Jerome Jordan, forward Josh Harrellson and second-round picks in 2014 and 2015 to Houston to get Camby.

Camby told the radio show that GM Glen Grunwald, assistant GM Allan Houston and head coach Mike Woodson put together a "great" presentation to recruit him to New York.

Camby, a 16-year veteran, said he's perfectly comfortable backing up Tyson Chandler andAmare Stoudemire in a reserve role.

"I'm not trying to come here and step on anyone's toes. I've been a starter every year in my career but I don't have a problem coming in here and playing alongside or backing up Tyson or Amare or any of those guys," said Camby, who played in New York from 1998-2001 and was a key part of the Knicks team that made a run to the 1999 NBA Finals.

"... I feel like I'm still capable of doing a lot of things, even despite my age, and being back home and playing in front of the Garden will definitely add a lot of inspiration."

Click here to listen to the full interview (it starts at the 18:50 mark).

COPELAND IN THE MIX: The Knicks are going to give Chris Copeland a shot.

New York signed the former University of Colorado standout to a non-guaranteed contract and gave him an invite to veteran's camp, according to his agent, John Spencer.

Copeland, a 6-8 power forward, will play with the Knicks' summer league team in Las Vegas and will have a shot to make the team during training camp.

The Newark native won the Belgium Ethias League MVP award while averaging 20.1 points per game while shooting 59.6% from the field during EuroChallenge competition last season.

Woodson Says Lin Will Stay, and Start

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Edited by willy cheesesteak - 7/13/12 at 12:21am
post #8664 of 19221
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConcernedParent View Post

Due to science/technology (nutrition, training, shit, even shoes), the game has gotten so much faster in the last 20 years; average athletes today would have been +athletes back then. Take MJ in his prime and directly ship him back 20 years- he'd drop 45 every game without fail. Same thing applies now. The 2012 team would probably run the Dream Team out of the gym in fast break situations... However, skilled big men apparently haven't evolved and the likes of Ewing, Robinson, Malone, etc. would school whoever the 2012 team put out there. I disagree with the notion that MJ, Pippen or whoever someone said was more "athletic" than anyone on the 2012 team. However most of the dream team have the sort of creativity and craftiness that comes from skills and smarts which ultimately I think gives them the edge over the 2012 team whom rely more on brute athleticism.

^the more athletic athlete from the future is a bit of a fallacy. sure standard things like bench press and running times have improved... but thats only incrementally... usain bolt may run a 9.59 or something.... but thats the most extreme example of only one variable: speed. but factor in the average times of all the athletes (like the total player population of the eras) and the differences in athletic ability is even narrower.

how about some poof that you can see with your own eyes...

this is a video about bill walton being possibly the best center ever (when totally healthy) by they guys at bbalbreakdown on youtube.

this was the game all the way back in 1977 during the finals and you can see how fast paced, physical, and athletic the players are. The game actually looks like a modern day game.

go to this part at 2:17 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7vTGoG53bF4&feature=player_detailpage#t=134s

look at how fast, physical, and high Dr. J jumps and jams on a totally contested breakaway..... about 2.5feet inside of the free throw line.

another example of extreme athleticism http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7vTGoG53bF4&feature=player_detailpage#t=157s

or a sick dunk in traffic?
Quote:
"Take MJ in his prime and directly ship him back 20 years- he'd drop 45 every game without fail."

do you think jordan would score 45 against the finals teams in 1977 (twenty years from 1996 jordan's prime)....maybe but then again he was dropping 45 during 1996 anyway... jordan might not even be the most athletic player on that court (after seeing some of the scary athletic shit Dr. J does).


also notice dr. J jams on Mike Bibby's dad's jew-fro and all... lol8[1].gif

the early 90's brought the extreme defense first trend from the Pistons and eventually the early 90's knicks.... there are trends that make the game looks super fast paced and exciting like the late 70's NBA and the recent 2010 onward NBA...but also slow like those early 90's teams.

so even way back in 1977 you could actually see that the finals teams could actually ball, probably even play the 2012 Heat or OKC competitively. the level of basketball play was at that high of a game even 35 years ago without a 3 point line.

barkley, pippen, malone, stockton, jordan, robinson, ewing, drexler, mullin were in their prime. no team was going to "out run" that group.

hell.... no one is going to outrun/gun/physical/ball finals teams from 1977...
Edited by LawrenceMD - 7/13/12 at 5:27am
post #8665 of 19221
To be fair to Kobe, what he said is being misreported. He said that the 2012 team could beat the Dream Team, not that they would. In a best-of-seven series, I think the 2012 team could win one or two games as the Dream Team let off the gas. In one game for all the marbles, no way.
post #8666 of 19221
Also, imagine if the OGDT had replaced Laettner with any number of other players. If you were playing international style ball you could have gone with somebody like Dale Ellis or Reggie Miller. If you were playing NBA style ball, you could put Shaq on the team.
post #8667 of 19221
Quote:
Originally Posted by Biggskip View Post

Also, imagine if the OGDT had replaced Laettner with any number of other players. If you were playing international style ball you could have gone with somebody like Dale Ellis or Reggie Miller. If you were playing NBA style ball, you could put Shaq on the team.

Or if they'd have replaced Bird with someone with a functioning back and knee.
post #8668 of 19221
US replacing Blake Griffin with Anthony Davis looks like. If he plays well, that's a lot of much needed size.

I wonder if it'll jumpstart Davis's career, being around all the superstars and seeing how they treat the game. It certainly helped Durant take things to the next level. Davis might be too young to really catch all the lessons though.
post #8669 of 19221
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gibonius View Post

Or if they'd have replaced Bird with someone with a functioning back and knee.

Good point.
post #8670 of 19221
Thread Starter 
Kyrie Irving challenges Kobe Bryant to 1-on-1 game, Kobe puts $50K on it, ethers rook


Quote:
Man, young fellas just are not scared of Kobe Bryant anymore, huh? Well, young No. 1 picks aren't, at least.

First, it was Anthony Davis — barely out of Kentucky, not yet a member of the New Orleans Hornets — saying that the player he was most looking forward to defending in the pros was the Black Mamba because, despite being a 6-foot-11 power forward unlikely to match up with too many off-guards, he wants to be able to say, "I shut Kobe down." Now, at Team USA's pre-2012 Summer Olympics training camp in Las Vegas, reigning Rookie of the Year Kyrie Irving straight up challenges the Los Angeles Lakers star to a game of one-on-one. In front of God, the rest of the team and everybody ... including a camera shooting video for DukeBluePlanet.com.

Privately, you'd imagine this reckless talk from the league's next generation must burn the five-time NBA champion something fierce. Publicly, though, Kobe shows that he finds it absolutely hilarious, and completely tears the Cleveland Cavaliers point guard to shreds with trash talk in one of the truly amazing sequences to come from Team USA's workouts.

"This is not a high school kid coming to you — 'Kobe, Kobe, oh my God!'" Irving says. "This is me, coming to talk to you, one-on-one."

A smiling Bryant then tells Irving that the price of a game is 50 large.

"But I'll cut it to 25 for you," he says. "Just for you."

He then intimates that Irving, whose career earnings after one NBA season trail Kobe's by juuuust a little bit, could get the full $50,000 from his father.
"But I know your dad don't think you can beat me one-on-one," Bryant adds. "I know that. I know that.

"Get your dad on the phone right now. Be like, 'Pops, I'm trying to bet Kob' 50 grand I can beat him one-on-one.' He'll be like, 'Son, are you crazy? Are you crazy?'"
Irving then reminds Bryant that he'd have to defend him, too, resulting in a scrunchfaced dismissal ("So?") before settling on a handshake deal to play the one-on-one game next summer, with the loser donating $50,000 to charity — possibly the Kobe and Vanessa Bryant Family Foundation, which has taken in more than $90,000 from auctions of Kobe's clear protective face mask and a game of H-O-R-S-E with the 14-time All-Star — and the winner hanging onto the even more valuable bragging rights.

But even with the deal sealed, the young point guard still feels frustrated.

"He thinks he's talking to a high school kid!" an incredulous Irving tells the camera.

"You just came out of high school, kid!" Bryant responds.

"I just came out of college!" Irving replies. "You came out of high school!"

"You played two games in college," Bryant answers. "You played two games. You are a high school kid."

Point of order: As Irving reminds Kobe, he actually played a whopping 11 games in his lone season at Duke University. This does not seem to alter Kobe's position one iota.

The continual trash talk — including Bryant predicting that if Irving tried to defend him when the Lakers play the Cavs, coach Byron Scott would immediately call for a Cleveland double-team, and the limitless ether of Kobe entertaining a comparison between Kyrie and Lil' Bow Wow ("Y'all about the same size") — is absolutely delicious, and its succulence only increases on subsequent viewings. If nothing else, the conversation proves that while Irving's game has come a long way in a very short time, he's not yet in Kobe's stratosphere when it comes to spittin' yang.


See, this is something that will be an interesting addition to All Star weekend, a one on one game among stars.

So who you got? Irving or Kobe? I think I'd still go with Kobe on this one despite the age difference.
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