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Best city for shopping? - Page 2

post #16 of 26
I know that London is quite amazing, as is Paris, for shopping. And I have been told (was there only for one day, so I did not get a chance to indulge) that Tokyo is truly amazing when it comes to shopping. Hong Kong should also get a nod. But, the winner is NYC. Most companies (especially those of the small, family based ultra-haute European goods kind) usually have at least one store (or "˜general store') that carries their merchandise. Just the sheer availability and selection is known the world over. RL on Madison carries almost every item in almost all sizes and available colors, not even the Chicago, Boston, Palm Beach, or Dallas stores have that selection. As much I like Bal Harbour or Worth Ave, Manhattan just blows them away. Jon.
post #17 of 26
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I don't think there is any place in the world like new york city; it really feels like the "center of the universe."  Problem is, the prices and taxes are very high-- you'd be better off shopping in Milan or Rome, I think, to get a better bang for your buck.
If you are looking for bang for your buck its really gonna make a difference as to how the currencies are doing. For example, you have to be either fabulousely wealthy or a little bit insane to spend dollars in Europe now or any time in the last year. Europeans get the better end of the deal, but admitedly you can get anything in NYC and if you are diligent enough for almost any range of prices. NYC gets my vote. PS: When I am in italy its all business and I dont get a chance to shop.
post #18 of 26
I have a friend in Chicago who says there is a limited selction of high end fashion there. S.F. isn't terrible as they do have a Neimans, Saks, Gucci, Prada, Wilkes Bashford but Bally, Fendi, Dunhill, etc are missing. From what it seems Tokyo would offer the most comprehensive selection. From the Hermes megastores to obscure lines such as Delvaux the city has everything. As well as the independent labels.
post #19 of 26
Quote:
I don't think there is any place in the world like new york city; it really feels like the "center of the universe." Problem is, the prices and taxes are very high-- you'd be better off shopping in Milan or Rome, I think, to get a better bang for your buck.
Actually, you can save on taxes by having the item shipped to your house instead of taking it with you, regardless if you are shopping in the EU or inside the US; there are no taxes when items are shipped intrastate. UPS Ground will cost about $4.50 for a 1 lbs shipment, the tax on a $700 RLPL cashmere sweater will be way more than $4.50, in say NYC. Jon.
post #20 of 26
Quote:
There are no taxes when items are shipped intrastate.
Doesn't this apply only if the store has no locations in your state? At least from what I've observed, ordering from Neiman Marcus or the Gap and having it delivered to a NJ address incurs no tax, but having it sent to a Georgia address rings up sales tax. I've bought things from Bergdorf/Barneys in-store only, so I've never tested this.
post #21 of 26
Quote:
Quote:
(imageWIS @ 21 June 2004, 2:12) There are no taxes when items are shipped intrastate.
Doesn't this apply only if the store has no locations in your state? At least from what I've observed, ordering from Neiman Marcus or the Gap and having it delivered to a NJ address incurs no tax, but having it sent to a Georgia address rings up sales tax. I've bought things from Bergdorf/Barneys in-store only, so I've never tested this.
NM and Gap have stores in NJ dont they? The way I understand the rule, if the ship to state doesnt charge sales tax (like NJ on clothes) then even if they have a location in state then there is no tax, however if you are buying from an out of state store but they have an in state store at the ship to location then they have to charge you tax since they ship to a taxable state. JJF
post #22 of 26
Quote:
Doesn't this apply only if the store has no locations in your state? At least from what I've observed, ordering from Neiman Marcus or the Gap and having it delivered to a NJ address incurs no tax, but having it sent to a Georgia address rings up sales tax.
I have bought shoes at the NYC Saks and had them shipped to Texas, where there are indeed other Saks stores. I was not charged tax. I have no idea if this was proper or not, but there it is.
post #23 of 26
I'm not 100% sure, but I think tax is only charge if they ship something directly to you, which was ordered in the state you will ship it to. Example: you go to NM in Dallas and have socks shipped to Florida, you will not have to pay sales tax, but if you order from NM online from Florida and they have stores in Florida, then you will be charged tax. At least this has happened to me before (and no I did not buy socks, my purchases cost way more {READ: over my budget, damn Italian goods.}). Jon.
post #24 of 26
Quote:
The way I understand the rule, if the ship to state doesnt charge sales tax (like NJ on clothes) then even if they have a location in state then there is no tax, however if you are buying from an out of state store but they have an in state store at the ship to location then they have to charge you tax since they ship to a taxable state.
This is what I was meant. D'oh. NM and the Gap do indeed have NJ stores, but NJ doesn't charge sales tax.
post #25 of 26
Tokyo is great for shopping, and not just for clothes. I particularly enjoy snooping around in Akihabara for the newest trends in electronics. Items are crammed into thousands of tiny shops - some so specialized that they sell nothing but two thousand kinds of pleated copper wire, or an enourmous selection of LED's in different sizes and colors. For clothes and fashion accessories - the first stop is usually Ginza, which is greatly overpriced IMHO, but people seem to be willing to pay it. Items from the major labels make it to Tokyo about the same time they hit New York, although I hear that Tokyo is becoming a bigger market, so gets priority 9 times out of 10. Shinjuku (home of the original Burberry Tokyo) and Shibuya are also good places to find high end labels. I didn't really get into it any further than that, but needless to say - it's a city where 80% of the men age 30-75 wear three button suits every day. And there are about 35 million people in the greater Tokyo metropolitan area (Tokyo, Kanagawa, Saitama, and Chiba ), so assuming a 50/50 male/female population, and and assuming that 30-75 is  only 65% of the population, there are 11.375 million suits in The greater Tokyo Metropolitan area every day. Interesting, don't you think?
post #26 of 26
ebaytropolis. . .more than just clothes. . .
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