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Woe unto you, Chrysler owners - Page 2

post #16 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirk diggler
Yep - Toyota's are bulletproof

http://money.cnn.com/2006/08/25/news...reut/index.htm

introduce complexity and variety into the system and they have the same problems that happen in the US

I didn't say bullet proof: I said they have got their act together, as in assuming / admitting that there is a problem and initiating a recall. Whereas Chrysler won't even admit there is a problem, and getting them to fix anything is an uphill battle. I rather have Toyota than Chrysler any day.

Jon.
post #17 of 31
Thread Starter 
It's the 2.7L engines, so your Stratus should be fine. Check out the comparison on sludge complaints:

Consumer complaints to Center for Auto Safety about engine oil sludge since January 2004
Make - Complaints
Saab - 7
Dodge/Chrysler - 737
Toyota/Lexus - 209
VW/Audi - 42
Source: Center for Auto Safety

Does anyone have strong feelings on buying higher-mileage imports vs. low-mileage domestics? I'm scrambling for a vehicle now, and am placing renewed emphasis on getting something more reliable.
post #18 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin
Does anyone have strong feelings on buying higher-mileage imports vs. low-mileage domestics? I'm scrambling for a vehicle now, and am placing renewed emphasis on getting something more reliable.
Get a higher mileage import. And really get an import. Get a car which has final assembly in Japan, Such as the Acura RL or the Infiniti FX. You can find final assembly info on autos.msn.com
post #19 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS
I didn't say bullet proof: I said they have got their act together, as in assuming / admitting that there is a problem and initiating a recall. Whereas Chrysler won't even admit there is a problem, and getting them to fix anything is an uphill battle. I rather have Toyota than Chrysler any day.

Jon.

actually, this came to light because of a CRIMINAL investigation that certain managers at Toyota's offices in Japan hid the news. I hardly would call that voluntary. In fact, the imports are known for "secret warranties" where they fix little problems when you bring your car in for the "required" service (after the annoying light comes on your dash). Not throwing mud, but let's call a spade a spade. Their quality is dropping fast because they are expanding and introducing new models to the mix. It is a geometrical increase (as opposed to a numerical) in problems to go from 7 model lines to 14, which is why all of the imports will eventually have the same level of problems as domestics. In fact, if you really want to compare numbers, take a look at the JD Power 90 day and 3 year surveys. Toyota is 6th after some of the domestics once you break out Lexus, which is the best.
post #20 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirk diggler
actually, this came to light because of a CRIMINAL investigation that certain managers at Toyota's offices in Japan hid the news. I hardly would call that voluntary. In fact, the imports are known for "secret warranties" where they fix little problems when you bring your car in for the "required" service (after the annoying light comes on your dash). Not throwing mud, but let's call a spade a spade. Their quality is dropping fast because they are expanding and introducing new models to the mix. It is a geometrical increase (as opposed to a numerical) in problems to go from 7 model lines to 14, which is why all of the imports will eventually have the same level of problems as domestics. In fact, if you really want to compare numbers, take a look at the JD Power 90 day and 3 year surveys. Toyota is 6th after some of the domestics once you break out Lexus, which is the best.

Eh...that's what Honda is there for. Personally, I bought a German car, sure it has its nuances, but the trade-off of interior quality, solid feel, and drivability is a fair trade-off for me. I still don't think that Toyota can reach GM's level. JD Power's IQS shows Porsche in the #1 spot and Lexus at #2.

Jon.
post #21 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS
Eh...that's what Honda is there for. Personally, I bought a German car, sure it has its nuances, but the trade-off of interior quality, solid feel, and drivability is a fair trade-off for me. I still don't think that Toyota can reach GM's level. JD Power's IQS shows Porsche in the #1 spot and Lexus at #2.

Jon.

What's the difference on cost of repair work on a German car versus a Japanese? Can you take your car just anywhere, or only the dealer, or what?
post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim
Dr. Push broom!
post #23 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnapril
What's the difference on cost of repair work on a German car versus a Japanese? Can you take your car just anywhere, or only the dealer, or what?

You can take a Toyota or Honda to more independent mechanics than you can, say a VW. At the same time, a higher-end German car (entry to mid-luxury class) is probably akin to a Lexus or Honda when it comes to level of complexity for repair, but I would imagine that the German cars charge a bit more per part. At the same time, I wouldn't own a German car outside of warranty and always assure that the scheduled maintenance is included or paid for upfront. Other than tire rotation / alignment, tires, windshield wipers, breaks and gas, there is no way I'm paying for anything else on the car.

Jon.
post #24 of 31
Personally, I don't find vintage cars that much more expensive to maintain than a new car, which I have no experience with. It's only from hearsay. Most parts are fairly plentiful, whether rebuilt or OEM, and there are usually niche mechanics who can perform repairs for a price similar to any other reputable mechanic. Unless of course, it's something like a Talbot-Lago or Facel to an extent, which might still be cheaper than trying to fix an '80s Maserati. It's taking repairs to the stealership that's very expensive.
post #25 of 31
Sometimes automakers will do unpublicized out-of-warranty repairs. They won't tell you about it, but if you know that there's a problem out there, they might take care of it.

My parents had a Ford Windstar from the mid-90's. Some of those engines had an engine flaw that, after about 50,000 miles, caused coolant to be sucked directly into the engine. It's a catastrophic failure that destroys the engine in about a minute. This happened to my parents' car just out of warranty.

With a little bit of internet research and after talking to an independent dealer, they found out that this was a common problem. After discussing it with the Ford dealer, the dealer admitted that he had seen a few others with the same problem, and that Ford had been replacing the engines for free.
post #26 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin
I've just received word that my 2000 Chrysler Concorde with 90,000 miles is totaled due to catastrophic engine failure caused by oil sludge. This problem is systemic of the 2.7L engine models; various sources all indicate that the engine was poorly designed and doesn't lubricate properly, eventually leading to a buildup of sludge even after regular oil changes that eventually brings the precise mechanical bits to a grinding, permanent halt.


Sounds like an easy fix. Buy one of these, for only $49:

http://kalecoauto.com/index.php?main...&products_id=8
post #27 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr_economy
I will never consider buying a Chrysler and will encourage all my friends/family not to buy Chrysler for as long as I live thanks to the experience we've had with them. Three minivans, all in the supposed "luxury" Town & Country minivan line had their transmissions die at almost the exact same mileage. This 7-year, 70,000 mile powertrain warranty they are now touting as a "feature" is actually a necessity - the likelihood of your Chrysler's poorly-built transmission dying on you in that time is near 100%! It's a shame a company owned by the proud name of Daimler produces trash like the Chrysler line.

Agreed, I have met a few people who have had the same tranny problems as above. Additionally, I had taken some time a while back to test drive most of the Chrysler products and felt that the cars were cheesy. The only product of thiers I did like was the 4 door pick up truck.
post #28 of 31
My Audi/VW 1.8Turbo has oil sludge too. Audi/VW sent all original owners a document stating to use synthetic oil and had approved brands.

Our German cars all suffer from electronic gremlins which is odd because the German's invited electricity.

I agree with others, that Japanese made autos are higher quality than the transplants. My first car was a Honda Civic Si made in Japan and now when I drove a domestic made Civic the quality sub par.
post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirk diggler
Yep - Toyota's are bulletproof

http://money.cnn.com/2006/08/25/news...reut/index.htm

introduce complexity and variety into the system and they have the same problems that happen in the US

Toyota is growing too quickly. They need to slow down. The Kentucky plant is having problems and seemed discover too many employees equal quality issues.
post #30 of 31
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Sometimes automakers will do unpublicized out-of-warranty repairs. They won't tell you about it, but if you know that there's a problem out there, they might take care of it.

Thanks Alf. So far Chrysler isn't budging on repairs due to sludge. I've heard of engines with as little as 44k blowing and Chrysler refusing to reimburse due to "improper maintenance." Rest assured I'll register my complaint with their customer service group, but at this point I don't expect it to get me anywhere. Salvage yard, here I come!
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