or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › General › General Chat › Choice of college major and usefulness
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Choice of college major and usefulness - Page 6

post #76 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by briancl
All this talk of Ivy league schools is really missing the point. There are many private schools that cost just as much, or almost as much as Ivy, that do not give these same opportunities after graduation. That is what I find to be puzzling.

Sure Ivy schools are expensive; however, there are distinct benefits. What about the schools that are expensive without the benefits? Why go?

One possible reason:

You want to go to a small (500-2500 students) school for the higher degree of personalized attention. There are few state schools this small but many many private schools. Private schools cost more than public schools (to a great degree).

bob
post #77 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by briancl
All this talk of Ivy league schools is really missing the point. There are many private schools that cost just as much, or almost as much as Ivy, that do not give these same opportunities after graduation. That is what I find to be puzzling.

Sure Ivy schools are expensive; however, there are distinct benefits. What about the schools that are expensive without the benefits? Why go?
What "benefits" you get depends on what you're looking for. People go to colleges for a variety of reasons and choose their schools based on a variety of factors. Also, not everyone gets accepted to their "first choice".
post #78 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by redcaimen
I was a Chinese major myself. Have never regretted it.
\t
----------------------------------------------------------------

Kuomintang or red army?


Tang dynasty Imperial Guard.
post #79 of 80
Tang dynasty Imperial Guard.
--------------------------------------------------

A bit long in the dragons tooth, aren't we?
post #80 of 80
Speaking as someone who did a history major at a well-regarded small liberal arts college:

A humanities education is a great investment in quality of life, if you value the life of the mind. Also, given that many of the highest-compensated careers these days require the abilities that are best honed in a liberal arts setting, it can be a great long-term financial investment as well. Better, perhaps, than a more vocationally-oriented major, once you couple it with a professional degree.

The catch is that it is a long-term investment. When I was looking for work after school-- and I had no help from anyone at my college-- friends of my parents were most encouraging. They loved my background in history and music, thought it was totally relevant to investments, etc. That what I heard from the top of the company. When I went to interview at HR, the 28-year-old handling my resume made it very clear that an accounting degree from Northeastern or Bentley would make them look less stupid recommending me for anything within their area of responsibility. Eventually I did enough to pay my dues and went back for a Master's degree. I did fine with that and got the job I wanted.

Possibly relevant factoid: when I took first-semester finance at my MBA program, the professor said to all those who were thinking about passing out of the course that in virtually every case an undergraduate finance major would be of no help in passing the exam, and that only one undergrad finance program was worth a damn (Wharton's). Given that, is there any real reason to grind away at a second-rate finance program when you'll have to do it all over again later on?

Second point, to catch up on an earlier discussion: there are a lot of musical doctors. For a while, I was on the board of a group that facilitates playing of chamber music by good amateurs. There were a lot of MDs in that group. Yo-Yo Ma's sister (a doctor) is an excellent violinist. There is an orchestra in Boston that is almost completely staffed by doctors. Albert Schweitzer...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Chat
Styleforum › Forums › General › General Chat › Choice of college major and usefulness