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post #31 of 80
That was just my observation form the people I know.
I graduated from a renowned HS here in Germany and it's exactly those people who are not only very interested in science but also good in music, languages, etc. that go on to med school in Germany (right after HS- the top 5% of the best ~25- 30% of all students have the required minumum grades to apply to med school...). Those people usually come from a very educated background. It's unfair but that's life. Education is somehow 'passed on'.

Actually, I a friend of mine who's a philosophy major in the US will be going to med school... Another student who has 'useless' major but an eye-surgeon for a father...

Obvioulsy there are lots of people who are very talented in music who have not the least ambition of becoming a doctor- therefore your 'sample group' might not be representative... It's just that those who are very interested and good in many subjects tend to be from backgrounds that can support them for a longer period of time.

---
P.S. A good friend is a top pianist and is beginning his study of music this fall and then wants to continue to become a conductor. He's just a music guy though he thought about physics as well...
post #32 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stax
I think this is generally true.

I will say, however, that the philosophy undergrads in my law school class did have one advantage over other law students with different backgrounds: we were all used to a socratic teaching style. we were comfortable taking and defending positions in a classroom environment and, most importantly, we were all used to being shown the error of our arguments in a public setting. Not to say that this doesn't occur in non-philosophy undergrad classrooms, but perhaps not to the degree common in typical philosophy classrooms. Admittedly, this is more of a psychological advantage, if that. Still, many of my classmates were terrified 1L's because they never before had been forced to take a stand and get shot down in a room full of people.

That's true. Nothing leaves you as exposed on a regular basis as philosophy if you're talking about the humanities.
post #33 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad
A law school friend of mine (who had majored in phil.) used to say he'd gone to law school because there were no unanswered questions left in philosophy.

hah! For me, it's not that all the questions have been answered, but that there are no questions left that can be answered.
post #34 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Violinist
That's true. Nothing leaves you as exposed on a regular basis as philosophy if you're talking about the humanities.
Oh, I dunno. At Cal in the late 80's, a classmate in several of my English classes was known on campus - for obvious reasons - as "The Naked Guy". I'd say he was pretty exposed.
post #35 of 80
I did economics and international studies and Im very happy with it.
post #36 of 80
I have a good friend who is a rather accomplished software developer. He wrote code and ultimately ended up running the software development efforts for some pretty major companies.

He told me that one of the best software developers who ever worked for him was a music major. He believed that the guy's music background gave him a unique perspective on problem solving and software architecture that the technically educated code writers did not have.
post #37 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad
Oh, I dunno. At Cal in the late 80's, a classmate in several of my English classes was known on campus - for obvious reasons - as "The Naked Guy". I'd say he was pretty exposed.

yeah! he was quite famous back then..
post #38 of 80
He sadly passed away recently. I saw him only once - quite eye-opening for a seven year old.
post #39 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad
Oh, I dunno. At Cal in the late 80's, a classmate in several of my English classes was known on campus - for obvious reasons - as "The Naked Guy". I'd say he was pretty exposed.

If my physique was as toned and defined as that guy, I too would have embraced my nakedness. Fortunately, for my friends, my body is too scrawny to pull it off.

I always thought that Berkely became a little less special, a little less Berkely, when it kicked The Naked Guy out of college and basically passed those new laws targeted at him. Its like you can't you even tell today that somebody graduated from Cal these days.
post #40 of 80
I am waitign for my Poli Sci degree tos tart paying off.I plan on goign to grad school and taking a crack at local politics.
post #41 of 80
5 years of studying Japanese literature in the Ivy League: $100k of debt.

Landing a plum job on a fluke because of my knowledge of classical Japanese: Priceless.
post #42 of 80
To take this thread on a different tack, why is it necessary to generate such huge debts? Why do people find it so critical to go to $30,000/year private schools when good state schools can provide a comparable education?

The only convincing argument I've heard is that going to an elite private school gives you the opportunity to make elite contacts. But if you aren't the type to schmooze for contacts, why strap yourself with these unnecessary enormous debts?
post #43 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Violinist
keep in mind that not everyone's idea of a fulfilling life is a little house with a white picket fence and a golden retriever. For some people, learning and the pursuit of new knowledge is the ultimate goal.

Stereotype.
post #44 of 80
Thread Starter 
The intent of the original post was this:

Assuming financial security is a priority for everybody, would it not make more sense to spend four years of one's young life in the pursuit of a subject/skill that will generate/guarantee said security?

For people who have more "education" after a four year college, such as physicians, lawyers, MBA's..etc, I suppose any major is OK (including music theory and art history ) provided one is subsequently able to matriculate in a graduate school.

That said, how good is the college diploma to those who don't further their education and end up subjects of headlines that report an increasingly difficult job markets for new college graduates?
post #45 of 80
Depends on what you do with your time in school. Depends on what you care about. Depends on a lot of things. So really this all goes back to a matter of perspective and preference, and there is no better or worse, in that regard. Just different.
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