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Choice of college major and usefulness - Page 2

post #16 of 80
You can't run an economy on econ and business majors. A graphic designer has to start the ad company before an MBA can manage it. A programmer has to write the software before the IT stock can be traded.

Personally, and I've heard this from other people as well, I think that the workforce is becoming a bit top-heavy with people on the finance side. Too many of the creative minds that would have founded a company a few decades ago are now working at hedge funds. Now, don't get me wrong, I have nothing against financiers of any stripe; they serve an important economic purpose. Still, it's important to have people actually producing ideas and things in addition to wealth.
post #17 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad
Why, because it runs contrary to your blind prejudices? Among many other things, becoming an accomplished musician reguires a level of discipline and focus that would well serve one aiming for medical school. Depending on what kind of medicine one intends to practice, manual dexterity isn't a bad thing to have either.

The reason why music majors, different than a musician, have a 'high' acceptance rate in medical school is because they are the people who are interested in medicine and not science. At no point do they doubt they want to be a doctor, and at no point do they think they are not going to be one. No matter what you major in, you have take a lot of pre-req classes in Biology and Chemistry for a medical school to even look at your application. If you're a music major and you didn't take those pre-reqs, or you didn't do well in them, you don't have a snowballs chance in hell of getting in.

But then, that's why music majors do well. It's because they aren't really music majors. They just don't want to be the scientist. They don't want to be the normal biology/chemistry 'pre-med' person. This is also why Art History, History and Philosophy majors who apply to Med school have good chances as well. It has little to do with their choice of study but their grades in their pre-req classes and their motivation to go to med-school.

Make no mistake though; the majority of applicants accepted into medical school have a scientific background. The two majors that have the highest acceptance rate into medical school are Music and Engineering. The exceptional medical students choose these majors. The majors themselves are not the cause of the acceptance.

IE, That you can play the violin has no real bearing on whether or not a medical school will accept. Not that musicians, or music departments, want to hear that.
post #18 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aureus
The reason why music majors, different than a musician, have a 'high' acceptance rate in medical school is because they are the people who are interested in medicine and not science. At no point do they doubt they want to be a doctor, and at no point do they think they are not going to be one. No matter what you major in, you have take a lot of pre-req classes in Biology and Chemistry for a medical school to even look at your application. If you're a music major and you didn't take those pre-reqs, or you didn't do well in them, you don't have a snowballs chance in hell of getting in.

But then, that's why music majors do well. It's because they aren't really music majors. They just don't want to be the scientist. They don't want to be the normal biology/chemistry 'pre-med' person. This is also why Art History, History and Philosophy majors who apply to Med school have good chances as well. It has little to do with their choice of study but their grades in their pre-req classes and their motivation to go to med-school.

Make no mistake though; the majority of applicants accepted into medical school have a scientific background. The two majors that have the highest acceptance rate into medical school are Music and Engineering. The exceptional medical students choose these majors. The majors themselves are not the cause of the acceptance.

IE, That you can play the violin has no real bearing on whether or not a medical school will accept. Not that musicians, or music departments, want to hear that.
I don't think anyone was suggesting that the choice of music/art history/ whatever as a major is what caused people to be accepted at medical school.
I have no idea what it means to say music majors who go on to medical school aren't "really" music majors. Of course they are. Being a music major with a strong scientific background doesn't make one any less a music major. Exeptional medical students don't choose music and engineering - you have the chronology wrong. It would be more accurate to say that many exceptional people who major in music or engineering go on to medical school.
post #19 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aureus
The reason why music majors, different than a musician, have a 'high' acceptance rate in medical school is because they are the people who are interested in medicine and not science. At no point do they doubt they want to be a doctor, and at no point do they think they are not going to be one. No matter what you major in, you have take a lot of pre-req classes in Biology and Chemistry for a medical school to even look at your application. If you're a music major and you didn't take those pre-reqs, or you didn't do well in them, you don't have a snowballs chance in hell of getting in.

But then, that’s why music majors do well. It’s because they aren't really music majors. They just don't want to be the scientist. They don’t want to be the normal biology/chemistry 'pre-med' person. This is also why Art History, History and Philosophy majors who apply to Med school have good chances as well. It has little to do with their choice of study but their grades in their pre-req classes and their motivation to go to med-school.

Make no mistake though; the majority of applicants accepted into medical school have a scientific background. The two majors that have the highest acceptance rate into medical school are Music and Engineering. The exceptional medical students choose these majors. The majors themselves are not the cause of the acceptance.

IE, That you can play the violin has no real bearing on whether or not a medical school will accept. Not that musicians, or music departments, want to hear that.

First of all, I have no interest in becoming a doctor. Secondly, my mother is a prof at both canada's best medical schools, and does a lot the interviews. My father, who is a surgeon, is very interested in someone's mechanical abilities, and in his experience, people who play instruments are automatically top candidates for working with their hands, not to mention are well acquainted with performance pressures. So I think you might be half right, at least based on what they tell me.

Anyways, all I said was that the percentage of music applicants who are accepted is 66%, the highest of any discipline. That doesn't mean there are a ton of musicians in medicine, it just means of the portion of those who apply, 66% of them get in, which is the most of any major.

Also, I know a ton of doctors from the USA and here, given that my parents are doctors and a lot of their friends are doctors. Almost all of them are involved in some type of visual art or music, some quite seriously. I think there is certainly a correlation.
post #20 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad
Exceptional medical students don't choose music and engineering - you have the chronology wrong. It would be more accurate to say that many exceptional people who major in music or engineering go on to medical school.
You just misunderstand the statement, and it was unclear so.... To be wholly accurate and difficult to misinterpret the statement would be: 'exceptional students who intend to go to medical school sometimes major in music' These are not people who are 'thinking about their options', they have no intentions to do anything other than medicine. The music majors anyway. The engineers probably are keeping their options open. The point of all this is because violinist orginally brought it up as if to say 'look, you don't need to study the field of something to succeed in it' Which is basically bullshit when it comes to medicine. Being a 'well rounded music major' has nothing to do with the music majors high acceptance rate into medical school. It has to do with high grades in the pre-req classes and a high score on MCAT.
post #21 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Violinist
First of all, I have no interest in becoming a doctor.

What does that have to do with this discussion at all?

Quote:
Secondly, my mother is a prof at both canada's best medical schools, and does a lot the interviews. My father, who is a surgeon, is very interested in someone's mechanical abilities, and in his experience, people who play instruments are automatically top candidates for working with their hands, not to mention are well acquainted with performance pressures. So I think you might be half right, at least based on what they tell me.

Anyways, all I said was that the percentage of music applicants who are accepted is 66%, the highest of any discipline. That doesn't mean there are a ton of musicians in medicine, it just means of the portion of those who apply, 66% of them get in, which is the most of any major.

Also, I know a ton of doctors from the USA and here, given that my parents are doctors and a lot of their friends are doctors. Almost all of them are involved in some type of visual art or music, some quite seriously. I think there is certainly a correlation.

What does any of that have to do with it as well? Perhaps I misinterpreted your original reason for bringing it up, but then why bring it up all? Also do you have a source for your now specific '66%' figure?

In regards to what you have said, doctors being interested in visual art, music, people who play instruments being better candidates for surgeons etc... is mainly true. But then almost every successful person I know, in all fields from accountancy to rocket science is interested in some visual art, music or hobby that they are very passionate about. It tends to go with the territory of being successful.
post #22 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aureus
You just misunderstand the statement, and it was unclear so.... To be wholly accurate and difficult to misinterpret the statement would be:

'exceptional students who intend to go to medical school sometimes major in music'

These are not people who are 'thinking about their options', they have no intentions to do anything other than medicine. The music majors anyway. The engineers probably are keeping their options open.

The point of all this is because violinist brought it up as if to say 'look, you don't need to study the field of something to succeed in it' Which is basically bullshit when it comes to medicine. Being a 'well rounded music major' has nothing to do with the music majors high acceptance rate into medical school. It has to do with high grades in the pre-req classes and a high score on MCAT.
I absolutely agree that anyone who wants to go to medical school needs to have a strong background in the relevant sciences. You statement about people not "thinking about their options" is probably right in many cases, although overbroad. I in fact knew people in college who did the groundwork for medical school to keep their options open, despite not being certain that they would ultimately choose that path. I know of at least one who ultimately chose to be a filmmaker (although he clearly had the "chops" for med school), and another who spent several years pursuing a music career before throwing in the towel and "settling" for medicine. But I think we're about 90% in agreement. I was really just responding to the post that somewhat glibly expressed doubt about the significant number of music majors among med school admittees.
post #23 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aureus
What does that have to do with this discussion at all?



What does any of that have to do with it as well? Perhaps I misinterpreted your original reason for bringing it up, but then why bring it up all? Also do you have a source for your now specific '66%' figure?

In regards to what you have said, doctors being interested in visual art, music, people who play instruments being better candidates for surgeons etc... is mainly true. But then almost every successful person I know, in all fields from accountancy to rocket science is interested in some visual art, music or hobby that they are very passionate about. It tends to go with the territory of being successful.

To prove that what you're writing is heresay and I actually have some facts behind what I'm saying.

As misinformed as you are, you are very correct in one way. Medical school nowadays IS very much about having high grades. That's why, like I've heard quite a bit from people like my mom, is that once you're in medical school, you can take it to the bank that you'll become a doctor. Unfortunately today, almost only grades matter and a lot of the time, that doesn't necessarily make the best doctors.
post #24 of 80
Isn't it true that people who are from well-off/ very educated backgrounds tend to be started in music by their parents early on and are 'forced' through the phase of wanting to give up... If you are from a very educated background you WILL be very well-rounded and interested in many things.
Also, no one will question your decison to study something that has no direct application (i.e. business, science, etc.) such as music. It's likely that you went to a pretty good college (high MCAT...) and wanted to know about more than just music, so you started going to science classes. Then, you think that another 200k in tuition isn't really such a problem as a) you don't have to work yet and b) you know you'll get through med school and become a doctor.

If we're perfectly honest it's just that status is passed on...
post #25 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hanseat
Isn't it true that people who are from well-off/ very educated backgrounds tend to be started in music by their parents early on and are 'forced' through the phase of wanting to give up... If you are from a very educated background you WILL be very well-rounded and interested in many things.
Also, no one will question your decison to study something that has no direct application (i.e. business, science, etc.) such as music. It's likely that you went to a pretty good college (high MCAT...) and wanted to know about more than just music, so you started going to science classes. Then, you think that another 200k in tuition isn't really such a problem as a) you don't have to work yet and b) you know you'll get through med school and become a doctor.

If we're perfectly honest it's just that status is passed on...

I suppose that would be true if almost everyone I know of taking music as a major wasn't broke.
post #26 of 80
philosophy is supposed to be a good undergrad for law
post #27 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by javyn
philosophy is supposed to be a good undergrad for law
IMHO, no more so than any of the humanities. Anything that requires critical reading and writing skills is helpful.
post #28 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by javyn
philosophy is supposed to be a good undergrad for law

worked for me
post #29 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad
IMHO, no more so than any of the humanities. Anything that requires critical reading and writing skills is helpful.
I think this is generally true. I will say, however, that the philosophy undergrads in my law school class did have one advantage over other law students with different backgrounds: we were all used to a socratic teaching style. we were comfortable taking and defending positions in a classroom environment and, most importantly, we were all used to being shown the error of our arguments in a public setting. Not to say that this doesn't occur in non-philosophy undergrad classrooms, but perhaps not to the degree common in typical philosophy classrooms. Admittedly, this is more of a psychological advantage, if that. Still, many of my classmates were terrified 1L's because they never before had been forced to take a stand and get shot down in a room full of people.
post #30 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stax
worked for me
A law school friend of mine (who had majored in phil.) used to say he'd gone to law school because there were no unanswered questions left in philosophy.
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