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Greek yogurt - Page 2

post #16 of 36
Just tried the Fage 2% w/peach. Not bad but not a lot of peach. I can't eat the honey flavor because the 3 times I've tried it all the honey has tasted like it was burnt. Don't know what the hell that's about.
post #17 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by MetroStyles View Post

1% Whipped Friendship Cottage Cheese. .

+1. The Organic Valley cottage cheese is the best but I've been using this Friendship one recently.

I've never had Greek Yogurt.
post #18 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Grant View Post
You couldn't be more wrong. Fat doesn't make one fat, overeating does.

Very true, but without carbs or a lot of protein I feel terrible and need to eat more, so almonds always end up adding onto other food.

I can however eat protein and fat with no carbs at 2 times - for breakfast and last thing at night. If I want to lean down after a period of overdoing it, salmon fillet and non fat cottage cheese for breakfast works very well

Non fat cottage cheese is awesome though. I have it with blueberries and strawberries if I'm having a carb based meal, and I have it with halved olives for supper if I'm going carb free.

Re snacks I've started to make soup with 5 or 6 vegetables in, and I have this as my carb source for breakfast and also as a snack later in the day. I must be racking up 10 pieces of fruit and veg a day. I'll live forever if the explosive dire-rear doesn't get me first
post #19 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arrogant Bastard View Post
Is there a better snack food on the planet than nonfat greek yogurt? So good! That Icelandic skyr stuff is great, too. So full of protein, which is great for my johnson and my ballsack.

Why is it good for your johnson and ballsack?
post #20 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDarkKnight View Post
Re snacks I've started to make soup with 5 or 6 vegetables in, and I have this as my carb source for breakfast and also as a snack later in the day. I must be racking up 10 pieces of fruit and veg a day. I'll live forever if the explosive dire-rear doesn't get me first

I do the juicing thing. I bought a home juicer and make about a liter of juice every morning. Then for dinner I make a fruit / greek yogurt smoothie. It gave me the runs for a while, but your body gets used to the insane amount of fiber and you get used to it. I go with the Fage 0% Unflavored Greek Yogurt for my smoothies.

Greek yogurt is tough to eat for me - maybe because I work in a yogurt facility which makes the sweet non-greek yogurts that kids eat for a sugar high (or middle-aged women who think they are being healthy). I have gotten used to the sweet dessert yogurt.
post #21 of 36
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Grant View Post
You couldn't be more wrong. Fat doesn't make one fat, overeating does.
Settle down, Beavis. Fat has more calories per gram than protein or carbohydrates do, and so you can pack more calories into a smaller item. A handful of almonds, for instance, is absurdly caloric. Fatty foods are not remotely filling, either. A lot of them are also salty, which increases your chances of eating too many of them. (Salted almonds are a big culprit here). Now, I would agree with you that 100 calories of X = 100 calories of Y, provided you are at a net surplus of 100 calories for the day. But you'd have a far easier time getting to that 100 calories if you ate fatty foods versus non-fatty foods -- with some notable exceptions, of course.
post #22 of 36
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ruben View Post
Why is it good for your johnson and ballsack?

LOL, that's just a line I wanted to throw in there. Since I am part of the DT Everywhere campaign, I need to keep all threaks outside of DT a little bit DTesque.
post #23 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arrogant Bastard View Post
One time I ate a bowl of baby carrots with half a tub of nonfat sour cream with French onion dip mixed in. It was coming out both ends for days.

And then what did you do with it?
post #24 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by MetroStyles View Post
There is something better.

1% Whipped Friendship Cottage Cheese. Tasty with a way better macronutrient profile than Greek yogurt. That said, it does not taste as good, but is significantly better than other cottage cheese brands.

Where 2 kop?
post #25 of 36
I just stocked up on Fage 0% plain yogurt; Whole Foods had 4 6oz containers for $5. So good in the morning or just whenever you start to feel hungry.
post #26 of 36
I prefer sheep yogurt. Most of the greek yogurt sold in stores tastes like toothpaste or something.
post #27 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quatsch View Post
Where 2 kop?

Grocery store. Depends on the location, very common in Northeast, couldn't really find it easily in Cali though.
post #28 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by MetroStyles View Post
Grocery store. Depends on the location, very common in Northeast, couldn't really find it easily in Cali though.
Friendship is based in NY so it'll be less likely to be distributed out West. 4% is still the king. You ever try the 2% with fruit in them? The pineapple ain't half bad.
post #29 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arrogant Bastard View Post
Settle down, Beavis.

Fat has more calories per gram than protein or carbohydrates do, and so you can pack more calories into a smaller item. A handful of almonds, for instance, is absurdly caloric. Fatty foods are not remotely filling, either. A lot of them are also salty, which increases your chances of eating too many of them. (Salted almonds are a big culprit here).

Now, I would agree with you that 100 calories of X = 100 calories of Y, provided you are at a net surplus of 100 calories for the day. But you'd have a far easier time getting to that 100 calories if you ate fatty foods versus non-fatty foods -- with some notable exceptions, of course.

I believe the appropriate response is "duh".
The solutions to the "issues" you mention are human behavioral ones, not the fault of the food.

As far as fatty foods being not remotely "filling" - you shouldn't eat to be "full"- when you get to that point you've typically already eaten too much.
post #30 of 36
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Grant View Post
I believe the appropriate response is "duh".
The solutions to the "issues" you mention are human behavioral ones, not the fault of the food.

As far as fatty foods being not remotely "filling" - you shouldn't eat to be "full"- when you get to that point you've typically already eaten too much.

Translation: you eatz almonds and have a fatty lardy wheatbelleh!!!!1
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