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French cuffs okay for a job interview? (legal) - Page 2

post #16 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
I would always default to button.
So would I, particularly for an internship or entry level full-time position.
post #17 of 47
Quote:
Re: cufflinks and french cuffs I see it commonly among lobbyists in DC and partners at big firms

This ^^ seems to be common in many professions in the US, where french cuffs are considered to be reserved for senior staff. If this is the case in law firms and you are interviewing for a junior position, you run the risk of looking like you have an inflated sense of your own importance. I think conservatism is fine for a law interview, but pretentiousness, not so much.

I know my view will take flak from some on the forum, but it will mostly be from people who have never worked in an environment like a law firm. If you actually want the job and its for an entry level or other junior role, I would avoid french cuffs. If it’s a moderately senior role, then you should be fine.

Of course, once you have the job, have a feel for the firm and have seen what is commonly worn there by your peers, then you can push the style boundaries a bit further.
post #18 of 47
This question has been asked before. The general consensus is that, while it probably will not matter for your interview, the only potential impact it could have is negative, and should therefore be avoided.
post #19 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJay View Post
So would I, particularly for an internship or entry level full-time position.

+1. Also this is Canada, not DC.
post #20 of 47
I would not wear french cuffs to an interview. Although it may not seem like a big deal within this realm, that's not typically the case within law firms. In my 2L recruiting experience I did not encounter a single attorney wearing french cuffs - many weren't even wearing suits! Although you likely won't get dinged because of the french cuffs, I am overly cautious and wouldn't take the small chance someone is put off by the "fancy shirt." I do think the suit sounds perfectly fine. "Look like a lawyer, rather than someone they have to turn into a lawyer." The fact that you peruse this forum gives me confidence you will be far better dressed than 95% of your classmates. p.s. you will be fine either way - don't spend time overthinking your attire when you could be "researching" the firm.
post #21 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gamma1234 View Post
p.s. you will be fine either way - don't spend time overthinking your attire when you could be "researching" the firm.

"i hear you have a rotation for your articling students, a mentorship program, and an open door policy? I like that about your general service corporate firm. If I were to choose any of the other identical firms in the city, I would most certainly choose yours."

Man...I was set on wearing the cuffs after the first page. Then the second page has been predominantly negative. I think I'm going to try them on when I pick up my suit, and see how I feel about them then. On one hand, they may be that last extra "little bit" that pushes the outfit over the top in a hiring partner's mind. On the other hand, they may be the last "little bit" that pushes the outfit into the douche-zone...
post #22 of 47
As others have said before, it will either be a non-issue or it can look a bit pretentious, a neutral or lose scenario. I would avoid it, play it safe.
post #23 of 47
I am a partner at a boutique law firm. I would look favorably upon someone who wore french cuffs, but I am likely in the minority. I think most interviewers would either be oblivious to the french cuffs or may view it in a negative light. I would advise against them and go with barrel cuffs. Good luck in the interview.
post #24 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by justaguy88 View Post
This question has been asked before. The general consensus is that, while it probably will not matter for your interview, the only potential impact it could have is negative, and should therefore be avoided.

+1. Most people won't care, but those who do will likely adhere to the outdated rule that they're too flashy and will dock points.
post #25 of 47
I was hiring partner at a large firm for a number of years. I would say no french cuffs.
post #26 of 47
I'm a second year student about to do OCIs in Toronto, so I'm in your exact same position. I initially purchased a shirt with French cuffs but chickened out and returned it for barrel cuffs for all the reasons listed above. I am very happy with my decision. During the interview the last thing that you want to think about is your dress, and now you can scoff at your peers who are wearing French cuffs to interviews. Just who do they think they are?
post #27 of 47
yes.
post #28 of 47
I don't think its a faux pas. You just have to make absolutely sure that you do it right, if you're going to do it at all. When done poorly, it has greater potential to go wrong. With all that said, I think you're probably over-thinking this. Just look professional, and game-plan your answers going into the interviews. Talk to some people in the year ahead of you, figure out some of their questions, and go from there. With only two firms, this is a practical way to make things easier for you. My point being, don't spend too much time worrying about what you'll wear - your interview skills are much more important.
post #29 of 47
Consider this:

If you're going for an interview, you want to project self-confidence, and a sense of being 'comfortable in your own skin'. Wearing a suit is a great way to project confidence, a sense that you've got your sh!t together, but if you're constanty fidgeting with cuffs and cuflinks that you don't normally wear, it's going to be a distraction in the interview, and your interviewer WILL notice.

I think that this applies to any suit / shirt combo: if it doesn't fit well, and if you're not sufficiently comfortable in what you're wearing to not be distracted by your clothes during the interview, you might want to practice wearing your suit / shirt / tie / shoes around your home or out in public to make sure you project yourself in your interview, not your discomfort.

Good luck!
post #30 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Some consulting guy View Post
This ^^ seems to be common in many professions in the US, where french cuffs are considered to be reserved for senior staff. If this is the case in law firms and you are interviewing for a junior position, you run the risk of looking like you have an inflated sense of your own importance. I think conservatism is fine for a law interview, but pretentiousness, not so much.
+1 spot-on! What is it with all these interview clothing threads? Applying for an entry level position (intern in this thread), but wants to dress like a partner. I would think the ego comes across in the interview. Frankly I *ding* all the people who come to an entry-level (or junior-level) interview trying to dress like a partner or managing director. That type of personality won't fit in unless it's an unconventional firm. It shows to me that you have an over inflated sense of self-worth and won't be happy with entry-level tasks. This would not be a problem I want to deal with considering the job market (especially among JDs), when there are so many others to choose from. Why take the risk? I am assuming you interned last year. What was your first summer job like? Did the entry-levels/ interns wear french cuffs? Dress is certainly part of the professionalism score. However it is normally not viewed negatively unless you do something departing far from what is expected for that said level and company culture. If you can bring me XX million in revenue, sure you can wear a black suit, a french cuff shirt with diamond cufflinks, brown shoes, and braces with funny animals on it. But until then...
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