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Dell U2410 Monitor or Apple 24 Cinema Display? - Page 3

post #31 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeDT View Post
Plasmas are also rather prone to burn-in of static images, another good reason not to use them as PC monitors.

Before long will be a permanent part of the monitor's image.

They use plasma monitors for information at the local airport. Even when they're OFF, you can still clearly read 'Arrivals', 'Departures', 'Air China', 'Gate 2', 'Hohhot', 'Beijing'....

...etc... all permanently burned into the plasma screens.

I've even seen plasma TVs where the station ID logo is permanently burned into the screen, e.g. 'CCTV News'.

Yeah, I never understood why people liked plasma. The deep blacks aren't a good enough trade-off for burn-in.
post #32 of 40
Not to question your interior decorating prowess but is a Monitor arm really required? My laptop currently sits atop 6 books and my screen is placed on a wooden block with some handy shelves built in. Took 20 minutes to make my monitor-raising in/out tray and cost less that £20,000 for my university course books. Cheaper and more efficient than an Arm.
post #33 of 40
I don' t know the current line-up, but all Dells are not equal. They have some VERY good displays at the top of their range and it's been like that for years. Dell uses everything from TN panels at the low end to PVA and IPS at the high-end. I haven't really considered the gaming aspect in a while, and i suspect any ghosting issues are long overcome, but in the past, the best displays for gaming weren't the IPS panels. Also, the cinema displays are nice under ideal lighting conditions, but as with all apple displays from their iphones on up, they're basically mirrors in a lot of situations. I like that my Dells have a non-glossy screen and a non-reflective bezel.
post #34 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackhood View Post
Not to question your interior decorating prowess but is a Monitor arm really required?

My laptop currently sits atop 6 books and my screen is placed on a wooden block with some handy shelves built in. Took 20 minutes to make my monitor-raising in/out tray and cost less that £20,000 for my university course books. Cheaper and more efficient than an Arm.

Most of my books are back in FL... there really isn't any room for a lot of books in a NYC studio. Anyways, with the arm I'll not only be able to raise the monitor to eye level, but as well, it will free up valuable desk space. There are some good, yet inexpensive arms available: monoprice.com.
post #35 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek View Post
I don' t know the current line-up, but all Dells are not equal. They have some VERY good displays at the top of their range and it's been like that for years. Dell uses everything from TN panels at the low end to PVA and IPS at the high-end. I haven't really considered the gaming aspect in a while, and i suspect any ghosting issues are long overcome, but in the past, the best displays for gaming weren't the IPS panels. Also, the cinema displays are nice under ideal lighting conditions, but as with all apple displays from their iphones on up, they're basically mirrors in a lot of situations. I like that my Dells have a non-glossy screen and a non-reflective bezel.
That is an issue with the HP monitor I bought, the screen is polished like a mirror. Great for some things, horrible for others. Any recs for calibration / optimization of the screen without using hardware calibration?
post #36 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS View Post
That is an issue with the HP monitor I bought, the screen is polished like a mirror. Great for some things, horrible for others.

Any recs for calibration / optimization of the screen without using hardware calibration?

Not really. The particular model i bought 2-3 years ago was known for great color accuracy out of the box. Hardware calibration got you a bit more, but not much. My screen looks great. That said, I'm not as fussy about my computer display as I am about home theater.

If you're really fussy and are going to be doing photoshop work and printing pictures, you could always just rent a colorimeter from a pro photography store with a rentals department. It's not like you'll have to recalibrate very often. B&H would be the obvious bet since you're in NY.
post #37 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek View Post
Not really. The particular model i bought 2-3 years ago was known for great color accuracy out of the box. Hardware calibration got you a bit more, but not much. My screen looks great. That said, I'm not as fussy about my computer display as I am about home theater.

If you're really fussy and are going to be doing photoshop work and printing pictures, you could always just rent a colorimeter from a pro photography store with a rentals department. It's not like you'll have to recalibrate very often. B&H would be the obvious bet since you're in NY.

Tje thing is I really don't want to spend any more money on this thing... It's bad enough I have to buy an arm. I watched an HD movie on it earlier and it looked amazing, but I don't want it as a TV, I want it as a monitor. I'll wait to see what happens after the arm arrives and I install the monitor at the proper level. If not, the monitor is going back to best buy.
post #38 of 40
Just because two monitors use the same panel does not mean they have the same visual quality.

The previous generation (or maybe the previous-previous) of these two displays used the same panel. NEC made a variant as well, also with the same panel.

I purchased the Dell and was quickly driven crazy by a "sparkle" affect when viewing white backgrounds. Apparently this is a function of the anti glare coating or whatever is in front of the screen.

The Apple had this issue but to a lesser degree. The NEC did not have it at all, so I ended up with the NEC.
post #39 of 40
High end Dell screens are very nice. Go Dell.
post #40 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by username79 View Post
Just because two monitors use the same panel does not mean they have the same visual quality.

The previous generation (or maybe the previous-previous) of these two displays used the same panel. NEC made a variant as well, also with the same panel.

I purchased the Dell and was quickly driven crazy by a "sparkle" affect when viewing white backgrounds. Apparently this is a function of the anti glare coating or whatever is in front of the screen.

The Apple had this issue but to a lesser degree. The NEC did not have it at all, so I ended up with the NEC.

Bingo. Plus, the rest of the hardware and software can be dramatically different, which can make or break a monitors performance, color, and clarity.
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