or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › General › General Chat › What is an easy language to learn quickly?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What is an easy language to learn quickly? - Page 2

post #16 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by why View Post
Trying to learn a language without learning its grammar is futile. The grammar is the language. Langue, not parole. Without it, there is no set of shared rules with which to communicate. Modern teaching methods might try to obfuscate this with candy and games of hangman, but the foundation is always present even if it's not apparent.
EEeeeh, maybe/probably/okay, BUT I would of course want to add some qualifications/additions (especially because it seems we're talking about two different grammars, one "Grammar" ((a system of markers/identifiers/structures that can be studied/analyzed from speech) and one "grammar" (a natural set of processes used to define language that the user doesn't necessarily have to apprehend consciously in speaking) haha. Anyway, this is a discussion best done over a bottle of wine, not in this thread. We'll save it until you bring a nice Chianti. I'll bring the Fava beans (slurrrrrp.) There is a certain point where instruction into grammar is absolutely necessary, and some forms that cannot be learned simply from immersion/input. However, that goes well beyond the OP's needs and this thread. It's a fun topic, though, so maybe we can start another thread... SOMEDAY (not today, as I really need to write syllabi.
post #17 of 66
One other note.

Some Spanish-speaking people are very attractive.

Rach may favor the Portugese, but Spanish speakers are more numerous.
post #18 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by mack11211 View Post
One other note. Some Spanish-speaking people are very attractive. Rach may favor the Portugese, but Spanish speakers are more numerous.
Empirical (i.e. pictorial/underwearical) evidence OR GTFO, Mack.
post #19 of 66
Spanish is the easiest of those four. Pronunciation is regular (what you see is what you get), and grammar is fairly straightforward. German is difficult to pronounce (far more so than French, for example), but has very regular grammar and conjugation rules. French is full of grammatical exceptions and irregularities. Producing some of the sounds (N, R) can be difficult for anglophones but otherwise speaking is relatively simple. Italian is the most useless language on earth. Only good for going to Italy on vacation. They don't even produce any worthwhile literature you'd want to read. Avoid.
post #20 of 66
Take Spanish: (Panamanian Cricket Team) +1 on Pimsleur. I liked it a lot.
post #21 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by holymadness View Post
German is difficult to pronounce (far more so than French, for example), but has very regular grammar and conjugation rules.
French nasals are a lot more difficult than anything in German except for maybe some umlauts. The inflections in German are a lot easier too since they're often accompanied by easily-distinguished consonants, and there are no phonological elisions in German like there are in French so it sounds like it reads. I guess it depends mostly on the speaker and their native language, though. German conjugation is no more regular than English, and most of the oddities are shared in their cognates (which German compounds with more complex tenses and moods and two extra grammatical categories).
Quote:
Originally Posted by holymadness
Italian is the most useless language on earth. Only good for going to Italy on vacation. They don't even produce any worthwhile literature you'd want to read. Avoid.
I'd say quattrocento literature, opera, the linguistic proximity to Latin, and a lot of modern Italian literature makes it worthwhile. It depends on each person and their need for the language, though.
post #22 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by rach2jlc View Post
I disagree; while it becomes pointless to talk about "ease" of languages, as they are all difficult, I think it is a mistake to buy into the "English is a germanic language and so german should be easiest" myth. There are a million pitfalls awaiting the happy English speaker as he begins his foray into German. And, as for Dutch, why bother? Might as well learn Coptic or something. (haha j/k)

the average dutch speaks better english than the average brit or american ..
post #23 of 66
Spanish is the most useful if you are traveling in the Americas. French is also very important since it is also spoken in many other places besides France. Both are some of the easier languages to learn coming from a native English-speaking background.

This is an interesting site I came across yesterday: http://www.buzzle.com/articles/the-t...-speakers.html

I've used Rosetta Stone in the past and it works well for gaining a basic grasp of a language. It makes learning a language pretty simple also, if you want a self taught course.

Quote:
Originally Posted by why View Post
I'd say quattrocento literature, opera, the linguistic proximity to Latin, and a lot of modern Italian literature makes it worthwhile. It depends on each person and their need for the language, though.

+1
I will probably learn Italian next, because of my musical background.
post #24 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by coldarchon View Post
the average dutch speaks better english than the average brit or american ..

Ummm... OK. And frog legs taste like chicken!
post #25 of 66
Frisian is English's closest surviving relative.

Quote:
One rhyme demonstrates the palpable similarity between Frisian and English: "Butter, bread, and green cheese is good English and good Fries," which is pronounced more or less the same in both languages (Frisian: "Bûter, brea, en griene tsiis is goed Ingelsk en goed Frysk.")
post #26 of 66
german is a bitch - it is actually very easy to learn poorly - I can make myself understood pretty much anything that I want to say, but I sound like a mentally challanged 5 year old. the verbs are extremly difficult, as are the tenses.

I'd say if you are in the US, and want to learn a language, go with spanish. you have access to spanish tv and movies, you have a lot of classes available, and you can find people to speak with.
post #27 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by unjung View Post
Frisian is English's closest surviving relative.

Yes, using a sentence entirely composed of Frisian cognates. However, when a person initiates scrivening in Latin and French cognates as I perform presently the similarities surcease.
post #28 of 66
Hay unas viejas nalgonas que son bien pisonas... pero no hablan ingles. My vote is for Spanish too.
post #29 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by coldarchon View Post
the average dutch speaks better english than the average brit or american ..

+1, also a Swede, a Danish...etc...etc...
post #30 of 66
There's no beat down like a Why beat down.

Quote:
Originally Posted by why View Post
I tried not to comment on this thread, but unfortunately you won't give up. No, German is not easier. German may have more similarities to English (specifically that it's more analytical than many other languages), but it has multiple significant divergences which still make it much more difficult to learn than other languages, especially in compound sentences where the primitive 'Ich bin sehr gut' word order gets scrambled and words start being marked for case and compound tenses. This is especially difficult for many English L1s to speak correctly because it forces them to create sentences with a more complex grammar than their foundational grammar. Still, even reading and trying to discern advanced German can be difficult -- read a page or two of Kafka and tell me it resembles English at all.

The English = Germanic distinction is superficial and elementary anyway, and concluding from those categories that Modern English is closer to High German because many people classify English as Germanic relies on the terminology and belies the basis for the categorization (what's in a name, et al.). The dichotomous 'Germanic' and 'Romance' families aren't used in historical linguistics much because they imply that the languages involved progressed simultaneously. Besides, the distinctions are often drawn based on historical language change, not their resulting forms.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Chat
Styleforum › Forums › General › General Chat › What is an easy language to learn quickly?