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Thom Browne: Not so bad after all... - Page 2

post #16 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivan Kipling
Women's mainline couturiers have always shown unwearable, often abysmal looking garments, during runway shows. I think this practice has infiltrated the men's collections, now . . . it takes genius to give avant-garde fashion direction, and to maintain a high taste level, at the same time. I'm not familiar with Thom Browne. As to whether or not he has what it takes to make a success of this daring and demanding recipe for fashion, I can't say. Maybe he'll make it, in fragrance.

The only woman's couturier in recent memory, who had what it took to be iconoclastic and tasteful, and flawlessly crafted, all at the same time, was Yves Saint Laurent.
Just my opinion, of course.
Christian Lacroix is not so bad either, and so is Jean-Paul Gaultier. (all for women, of course) !luc
post #17 of 78
Hi Luc . . . don't forget, I'm almost 51. To my eye, Saint Laurent was, always has been, and always will be, the best. But that's for another thread. btw: check that dress in my avatar.
post #18 of 78
Thread Starter 
Jean-Paul Gaultier definitely went nuts in The Fifth Element, though it made sense to.
post #19 of 78


Gaultier did some interesting things, for Madonna. Personally, I'm a big fan of cone shaped, brassieres on women. Here's a shot of my cousin, at my mother's wedding: June, 1951. NOW, that's a silhouette!



post #20 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivan Kipling
Gaultier did some interesting things, for Madonna. Personally, I'm a big fan of cone shaped, brassieres on women. Here's a shot of my cousin, at my mother's wedding: June, 1951. NOW, that's a silhouette!
Ivan, I'm a big fan of the pointed brassieres as well. It has such a polished aesthetic about it as compared with the more natural looking items in vogue today. In fact, today's cleavage is gauche; sort of a distasteful throwback to the 18th century. As for women's couture there is the sheer brilliance of the ugliness of Viktor & Rolf's 1998 Haute Couture Atomic collection: Or early John Galliano, not his current redundancies: The fantastic aestheticism of Jeremy Scott circa 1998, Contre Pied collection:
post #21 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luc-Emmanuel
Christian Lacroix is not so bad either, and so is Jean-Paul Gaultier. (all for women, of course)

!luc
The genius that was Lacroix for Jean Patou Haute Couture 1987:



Gaultier was exceptionally excellent for 1998:

post #22 of 78
Hi Label,

As a small boy, I was truly fascinated by the pointed body parts with which women came equipped. Many women in my family were very style conscious, vain, good looking, and vivacious. The cousin pictured here, I think, had the world's shortest Achilees tendon. I don't think I ever ever saw Kay, minus four inch, stilettos.

Label King, I could give you reasons why each and every one of the ensembles you've shown, is inferior to Saint Laurent's work. I don't want to do that, right here. Also, I'm afraid we'd bore many, many posters, too.
post #23 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivan Kipling
Hi Label,

As a small boy, I was truly fascinated by the pointed body parts with which women came equipped. Many women in my family were very style conscious, vain, good looking, and vivacious. The cousin pictured here, I think, had the world's shortest Achilees tendon. I don't think I ever ever saw Kay, minus four inch, stilettos.

Label King, I could give you reasons why each and every one of the ensembles you've shown, is inferior to Saint Laurent's work. I don't want to do that, right here. Also, I'm afraid we'd bore many, many posters, too.

Hey, you must be floutist, who used to post on Ask Andy. I remember you talking about YSL and the whole flou thing. You no longer post there. How come?
post #24 of 78
Thread Starter 
Cone shaped brassieres? ... Why not just NO brassiere?
post #25 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jovan

Why not just NO brassiere?


Because it's ALL about the lingerie.
post #26 of 78
Jovan, I've never ever gone, for a 'no bra,' look. I don't care HOW good looking, or young, or fit a woman is. To me, it's not sexy. The jutting, cone shaped torpedo type bustline that stars wore, back when I was a child . . . was simply breathtaking. I still prefer pointed cones, to any other silhouette. Just my thing, I guess.


Tomasso . . . Dior was EMPHATIC, for foundations. He said 'without foundation, there can be no fashion.' I think to a certain extent, Dior was correct.
post #27 of 78
, another post from your blog!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jovan
As many of you remember, I made a rant earlier sometime this year about how he was pretty laughable. Well... since actually learning about him I've come to find something to like. Granted, I think his personal style needs a bit of a checkup. The unironed shirts, way-too-small suits, and tie tuck make him look like... well... a vintage hobo. Also, his asking prices are rather high for someone who claims he's after young guys for his market, most of whom don't have $3000 to blow on a new suit or a couple thousand for a sweater. I also thought a few of his ideas, such as the jersey mesh dinner jacket and suiting shorts, were pretty laughable. Despite these nitpicks, I can't help but notice that his clothes are generally well constructed and nice looking. Also, after seeing a few buyers of his clothing (including our own Get Smart) I'm a bit relieved to see they don't all have pants halfway to their knees or jackets that barely reach their hips. Secondly, you could say the style has grown on me a bit. Stay confirmed it. I would wear pretty much everything Mr. McGregor did, possibly with the exception of the footie socks (the quarter length ones I saw in a production photo were quite swell though). The trousers weren't overly short, and looked pretty natural on Ewan's character. Even the fact that he didn't have his collar points buttoned down didn't bother me. It was all pulled off very well, and of course the shirts were ironed which helped. I'm a big fan of that black varsity stripe cardigan. So basically, I learned you shouldn't knock someone you don't know just because they seem strange or unconventional to you. Enough prejudice exists in the world as it is.
post #28 of 78
Thread Starter 
This isn't from my blog.
post #29 of 78
Edit
post #30 of 78
Thread Starter 
Men's skirts? Aren't those just kilts? Brands like Gucci and Prada put me off because they use fusing on $3000 suits and the fabrics don't look very good. I also can't say I like the cut, fit, or how all of them seem to be two button double vent jackets with low rise boot cut trousers.
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