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Meditation

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Is there anyone who meditates on a regular basis at all or use any other type of relaxation technique, be it working out, writing poetry etc.? I'm interested in what people do or know about and wish they could do more regularly. Basic techniques you can do at the comfort of your own home would be best but even more advanced techniques are good.

In high school, some of the teachers took class time to do a basic breathing technique in which you sit in a relaxed position (but not slouching), close your eyes, stop any outside thoughts and concentrate solely on your breathing. For some reason they emphasized having a much longer exhale than inhale and usually talk you through the process to keep you focused.
post #2 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by kapay
Is there anyone who meditates on a regular basis at all or use any other type of relaxation technique, be it working out, writing poetry etc.? I'm interested in what people do or know about and wish they could do more regularly. Basic techniques you can do at the comfort of your own home would be best but even more advanced techniques are good.

In high school, some of the teachers took class time to do a basic breathing technique in which you sit in a relaxed position (but not slouching), close your eyes, stop any outside thoughts and concentrate solely on your breathing. For some reason they emphasized having a much longer exhale than inhale and usually talk you through the process to keep you focused.

I was about to post a new thread about this and then I saw yours!

A couple of years ago, in college, I had a class about Buddhism. The teacher, for the first 5 minutes of class, would have us sit quietly and meditate. Just focusing on the breath. I think we would count to 10 breathes and start over. It made quite a difference in class! I noticed I was more present and focused for the class.

Currently, around 230 pm, I go to a room in my building during work and meditate for about 10 - 15 min. I just sit and count my breaths (1-10 and then start over). I take my cell phone and set the alarm because sometimes I'm so tired I fall asleep.

The effects are great! If I meditate, I'm wide awake and feel refreshed for the rest of the day. It's gotten to the point where I miss it if I don't get to do it.


Edit: I forgot to mention, I never had the patience to sit down and meditate on my own so I bought a couple of meditation cds. It was very helpful to let the cd guide me as opposed to trying to do it myself. Once I did the cd a couple of times, I could sit and do it on my own for at least 5 or 10 minutes.
post #3 of 12
I did a stint at a Burmese monastery and then lived alone for a couple years in the mountains to work on my practice. I have rolled the practice over in to my creative work. You might consider a 10-day course at the North Fork center.

http://www.mahavana.dhamma.org/
post #4 of 12
My synapses being as damaged as they are, don't seem to be geared for meditation. I have, however, learned to slow down my heart by some rather easy breathing exercises, which I find to be quite relaxing. Wish I could empty my brain through meditation.
post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnapril
I did a stint at a Burmese monastery and then lived alone for a couple years in the mountains to work on my practice. I have rolled the practice over in to my creative work. You might consider a 10-day course at the North Fork center.

http://www.mahavana.dhamma.org/


Sorry, john, I have to ask - is that accurate language? did you live alone in the mountains a few years to work on your practice? that is, the main reason for living alone for a few years was to practice meditation?
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter
Sorry, john, I have to ask - is that accurate language? did you live alone in the mountains a few years to work on your practice? that is, the main reason for living alone for a few years was to practice meditation?
Yes. I was three months at the monastery and then two more in northern Burma and Laos. I ran out of money and returned to the United States where I lived in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada for a couple years to continue my practice with less interference. The idea was to solidify the practice during a naive point in my understanding of what it was.
post #7 of 12
Your HS teacher knew what he/she was talking about, that's the way to do it. Forget the visualization exercises and other garbage people talk about now.

Quote:
do a basic breathing technique in which you sit in a relaxed position (but not slouching), close your eyes, stop any outside thoughts and concentrate solely on your breathing.

You can, you just need to practice.

Quote:
Wish I could empty my brain through meditation.
post #8 of 12
I keep a dream journal. It helps me understand how I react to things. Dont forget to come up with code words for the naughty bits if the wife/gf should get curious.

by the way, would anyone know where I could buy a pen with a light on it so I can write in the dark?
post #9 of 12
how about just clip a book light to the pad/notebook
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnapril
Yes. I was three months at the monastery and then two more in northern Burma and Laos. I ran out of money and returned to the United States where I lived in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada for a couple years to continue my practice with less interference. The idea was to solidify the practice during a naive point in my understanding of what it was.


wow
post #11 of 12

This thread is pretty old.

 

But, if anybody is interested, I am always happy to answer any questions about meditation.

post #12 of 12
I enjoy meditating, but even more so I really love Yoga. If practiced on a regular basis, you'll soon progress into a meditative state during class. Yoga not only helps you practice mindfulness, but it's also great for your body. It will also oxygenate your blood, improve heart health, detoxify your liver as well as increase your sexual appetite and performance. Why do you think Sting has done Yoga every day for the last 20 years? Because it's rad, man.
 
Here's a quick description of the five methods of yoga to sample:
 

1. Ashtanga. A series of physical postures that are based on breath, focus (Drishti), and strength to detoxify the body and mind, ultimately leading the practitioner to a state of ultimate truth and bliss.

2. Iyengar. Brings a hyper focus to detail, precision, and alignment of the body and control of the breath.

3. Restorative. This method is a more relaxing option. Practitioners spend a lengthy five minutes in each posture to ensure deep openings and total relaxation. But don’t worry, your system still receives a number of benefits.

4. Sivananda. Uses a set sequence of 12 foundational postures.

5. Kundalini. Feel the Shakti. This method is highlighted by a lot of breath work and mantras (sanskit scriptures) to uncoil the universal creative force that lies dormant at the base of one’s spine and leads toward union with the divine.

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